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I am trying to understand a code, here is fragment which is causing confusion:

typedef map<int, Person, less<int> > people_map;
people_map people;
.
.
.
cout << "Erasing people of age 100" << endl;

    for (people_map::iterator j = people.begin(); j != people.end();) {
        if (j->second.GetAge() == 100)
        {

            people.erase(j++); // iterator is advanced before the erase occurs

        }
        else
            ++j; // advance the iterator
    } // end of erase loop

the confusion is: if i want to increment j after the function call it causes segmentation fault. I am not able to understand why:

I change it to something like this:

 if (j->second.GetAge() == 100)
        {
            temp = j++;
            j--;
            people.erase(j); // iterator is advanced before the erase occurs
            j=temp;

        }

causes segmentation fault.

or like this:

 if (j->second.GetAge() == 100)
        {
            people.erase(j); // iterator is advanced before the erase occurs
            j++;   
        }

causes segmentation fault.

here is the complete program listing:

// disable warnings about long names
#ifdef WIN32
#pragma warning( disable : 4786)
#endif

#include <string>
#include <map>
#include <algorithm>
#include <iostream>
#include <sstream>
#include <iterator>
#include <functional>

using namespace std;

class Person {
    // private members
    string m_sName;
    string m_sEmail;
    int m_iAge;

public:

    // constructor

    Person(const string sName,
            const string sEmail,
            const int iAge) :
    m_sName(sName), m_sEmail(sEmail), m_iAge(iAge) {
    };

    // default constructor

    Person() : m_iAge(0) {
    };

    // copy constructor

    Person(const Person & p) :
    m_sName(p.m_sName), m_sEmail(p.m_sEmail), m_iAge(p.m_iAge) {
    };

    // operator =

    Person & operator=(const Person & rhs) {
        // don't assign to self
        if (this == &rhs)
            return *this;

        m_sName = rhs.m_sName;
        m_sEmail = rhs.m_sEmail;
        m_iAge = rhs.m_iAge;
        return *this;
    };

    // access private members

    string GetName() const {
        return m_sName;
    };

    string GetEmail() const {
        return m_sEmail;
    };

    int GetAge() const {
        return m_iAge;
    };

}; // end of class Person

// function object to print one person

class fPrint {
    ostream & m_os;

public:

    // constructor - remember which stream to use

    fPrint(ostream & os) : m_os(os) {
    };

    // person object arrives as a pair of key,object

    void operator() (const pair <const int, const Person> & item) const {
        m_os << "# " << item.first << " - name: "
                << item.second.GetName()
                << " - " << item.second.GetEmail()
                << ", age " << item.second.GetAge()
                << endl;
    };

}; // end of class fPrint

// declare type for storing people (numeric key, person object)
typedef map<int, Person, less<int> > people_map;

int main(void) {
    // make a map of people
    people_map people;

    // add items to list
    people [1234] = Person("Nick", "nick@some-email-address.com", 15);
    people [4422] = Person("Fred", "fred@nurk.com.au", 100);
    people [88] = Person("John", "john@smith.com.au", 35);
    // insert a different way ...
    people.insert(make_pair(42, Person("Abigail", "abigail@blah.com.au", 22)));

    // best to declare this on its own line :)
    fPrint fo(cout); // instance of function output object

    // print everyone (calls a function object to print)
    cout << "Printing all using fPrint ..." << endl;
    for_each(people.begin(), people.end(), fo);

    // find someone by key
    cout << "Finding person 4422 ..." << endl;

    people_map::const_iterator i = people.find(4422);

    if (i == people.end())
        cout << "Not found." << endl;
    else {
        fo(*i); // dereference and print

        // another way of printing -

        // key itself is the "first" part of the map pair ...
        cout << "Found key = " << i->first << endl;

        // person object is the "second" part of the map pair...

        cout << "Found name = " << i->second.GetName() << endl;
    }

    // Note, this will not work:
    //   fPrint (cout) (*i);

    // However this will:
    //   0, fPrint (cout) (*i);

    // However I think the extra zero is a bit obscure. :)

    // An alternative way of finding someone.
    // Note - this will add them if they are not there.
    // Since this is a reference changing it will change the person in the
    // map. Leave off the & to get a copy of the person.

    Person & p = people [1234];

    cout << "Person 1234 has name " << p.GetName() << endl;

    // Example of erasing an element correctly ...
    // If we did the j++ as part of the for loop we would end up
    // adding 1 to an iterator that pointed to an element that was
    // removed which would lead to a crash. See Josuttis p 205.

    cout << "Erasing people of age 100" << endl;

    for (people_map::iterator j = people.begin(); j != people.end();) {
        if (j->second.GetAge() == 100)
        {

            people.erase(j++); // iterator is advanced before the erase occurs

        }
        else
            ++j; // advance the iterator
    } // end of erase loop


    // now display who is left
    cout << "Printing people left after erase ..." << endl;
    for_each(people.begin(), people.end(), fo);

    return 0;
} // end of main
share|improve this question
    
I think it is a duplicate of stackoverflow.com/questions/596162/… –  Anna Dec 25 '09 at 20:06

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

erase invalidates the iterator to the erased element.

 if (j->second.GetAge() == 100)
        {
            temp = j++;
            j--;
            people.erase(j); // iterator is advanced before the erase occurs
            j=temp;

        }

This doesn't work because you set temp equal to the old value of j, and hence you'll keep using the invalidated iterator. The result of post-increment is the original value of the operand.

I suppose you could also do it like this, which is functionally the same as the working code, except it doesn't use the temporary result of post-increment:

if (j->second.GetAge() == 100) {
    temp = j;
    ++j;
    people.erase(temp);
}
share|improve this answer
    
also i just tried using temp = ++j; and it worked as expected! –  sachin Dec 25 '09 at 20:32

Erase invalidates your iterator, this is why postfix increment is used. It doesn't pass advanced iterator to erase, it passes current iterator but advances as a sideffect.

people_map::iterator erase_it = j++;
people.erase(erase_it);

You have a problem with postfix increment, this is why your attempts have failed.

int i = 1;
int j = i++; // j == 1, i == 2
share|improve this answer

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