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I need to detect certain file in running processes. So far I've done this by computing MD5 of whole exe file. This approach has one mistake: By editing icon, adding byte there or changing something in PE header, hash is different. With this information it's "how to compare different files to be evaluated as same", which is little vague, so make it how to compare two executable part of .exe files (ignoring, header, resources etc..). What are parts, which cannot be changed in order to maintain same functionality ? This propably won't be the ultimate answer, because there are several ways to represent same functionality. For example replacing string with unicode or just changing that string.

So how to compute similarity of two executable files ?

I prefer C# code, because app is in .NET, but i would be grateful for any advice or thoughts on this subject.

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Are these .NET executables also? –  ja72 Oct 27 '13 at 17:15
    
Why? What is the goal? Perhaps there is a solution that is an answer to another question. –  Tyler Jensen Oct 27 '13 at 22:11
    
No, these are generic executables(.NET and NOT) Goal is to detect running process(it could be slightly changed) it's an anticheat software. –  Kryštof Hilar Nov 2 '13 at 10:53

2 Answers 2

You will find what you want to do can be quite difficult. You can donwlad the MS executable format here: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/hardware/gg463119.aspx

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You can load your file binaries to SOUNDEX algo (but for numbers) and then compare them with specified precision. I don't know how it will work but if changing icon only changes small bytecode portion it should work fine.

I want to add that I have no idea how good this will work with files, but in theory it should work fine.

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