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Purpose: program to shuffle the lines of a text file

  • Read the file into an array

  • Count lines and maximum length

  • Compute maximum width for array

  • Get file pointer to the beginning

These are what I'm trying to do in the first part of the program to give you some perspective. I'm not exactly sure what is meant by "Get file pointer to the beginning". However, my current problem is error reading the lines into an array as strings.

Updated code that seg. faults when I go to print shuffled array.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <time.h>
// Accepts: command line input
// Returns: 0 if no error

int main(int argc, char *argv[] ){
    int x = 0, i, lineCount = 0, maxLen = 0;
    char line[500], temp;
    FILE *file = fopen( argv[1], "r" );
//  check if file exists
    if (file == NULL){
        printf("Cannot open file\n");
        return 1;
    }
//  Gets lines, max length of string    
    while (fgets(line, sizeof(line), file) != NULL){
        lineCount++;
        if (strlen(line) > maxLen)
            maxLen = strlen(line);
    }
    rewind(file);
    char *lineArray[lineCount];
    while (fgets(line, sizeof(line), file) != NULL) {
            lineArray[x] = malloc(strlen(line));
        if (lineArray[x] == NULL){
            printf("A memory error occurred.\n");
            return(1);
        }
            strcpy(lineArray[x], line);
//  change \n to \0
        lineArray[x][strlen(lineArray[x])-1] = '\0';
        x++;
    }
    printf("File %s has %d lines with maximum length of %d characters\n",
        argv[1], lineCount, maxLen);
    printf("Original Array\n");
    for (x = 0; x < lineCount; x++)
        printf("%2d %s\n", x, lineArray[x]);
//  Shuffle array
    srand( (unsigned int) time(NULL));
    for (x = lineCount - 1; x >= 0; x--){
        i = (int) rand() % lineCount;
        temp = lineArray[x];
        lineArray[x] = lineArray[i];
        lineArray[i] = temp;
    }
    printf("\nShuffled Array\n");
    for (x = 0; x < lineCount; x++)
        printf("%2d %s\n", x, lineArray[x]);
//  free allocated memory
    for (x = 0; x < lineCount; x++)
        free(lineArray[x]);
    free(lineArray);
    fclose(file);
    return 0;
}
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Try fgets instead of fscanf and the printf inside the loop will segfault before the loop ends (lineArray[x] == NULL) –  Kninnug Oct 27 '13 at 14:48

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

lineArray should be declared as an array of char * instead of a pointer to char:

char *lineArray[MAX_LINES];

Also, consider what happens when you enter the while loop: your code has undefined behavior, because you are accessing lineArray[x], which was never initialized, and will contain garbage values.

You should use fgets instead to read a whole line into line, and then copy it into lineArray. Something like this:

while (fgets(line, sizeof(line), file) != NULL) {
    lineCount++;
    lineArray[x] = malloc(strlen(line));
    strcpy(lineArray[x], line);
    printf("%s\n", lineArray[x]);
    x++;
}

From your post, it appears that you don't want to be limited to MAX_LINES, and you want to read the whole file first to determine the array size. To do so, you can use a similar loop to count the number of lines first, like this:

while (fgets(line, sizeof(line), file) != NULL) {
    lineCount++;
}

After this loop, lineCount will hold the size for lineArray.

In this case, you may want to declare lineArray as char ** and allocate it dynamically:

lineArray = malloc(sizeof(char *)*lineCount);

Then, get back to the beginning of the file by calling rewind(file); and execute the loop that copies each line into lineArray. In summary, your code would look something like:

while (fgets(line, sizeof(line), file) != NULL) {
    lineCount++;
}

lineArray = malloc(sizeof(char *)*lineCount);

rewind(file);

while (fgets(line, sizeof(line), file) != NULL) {
    lineArray[x] = malloc(strlen(line));
    strcpy(lineArray[x], line);
    printf("%s\n", lineArray[x]);
    x++;
}

Note 1: This is inefficient. File I/O is extremely slow, and you're reading it twice. Consider if this is really how you want to do it. Maybe a good approach would be to force input files to say how many lines they have.

Note 2: You should check malloc()'s return value. I didn't do it in this example, but in real world, please do it.

Note 3 : In the end, remember to free() every position lineArray[i], and after that, free lineArray.

share|improve this answer
    
Do you know what is meant by "Get file pointer to the beginning"? Your help is much appreciated. What you have given me is working, but my next step after the 4 bullets I have above is to "Reserve memory for a dynamic array of strings". So, I believe I need to use malloc later. –  WorldDominator Oct 27 '13 at 15:06
    
Get file pointer to the beginning is basically calling rewind(file). I included that in my answer. You need to do it because after you read the file for the first time, your pointer will be at the end of the file, and you need to get it back up. And reserving memory for a dynamic array of strings is as simple as lineArray = malloc(sizeof(char *)*lineCount);. In the final piece of code, lines are counted, a dynamic array of strings is created, the pointer is reset, and the file is read again to copy each line into the newly allocated array. –  Filipe Gonçalves Oct 27 '13 at 15:08
    
Thank you sir. I have been staring at this all weekend and I finally decided to make an account here and I'm glad I did! –  WorldDominator Oct 27 '13 at 15:13
    
I keep getting seg faults when I tried to print the shuffled strings. Any idea how to fix it? –  WorldDominator Oct 27 '13 at 20:02
    
@WorldDominator It's hard to tell without showing us how the code looks like right now. I'm guessing your shuffling has some error. My advice: create another question with the new, updated code. Don't forget to mention what's the expected output, what is happening, and where you think the error is. –  Filipe Gonçalves Oct 27 '13 at 21:39

lineArray is just a character pointer here and that too uninitialized. It'd point to only one byte. It has to be an array of character pointers if it has to hold multiple lines, so that lineArray[x] or lineArray++ takes you to the next line in the array of lines.

share|improve this answer
    
Be careful with lineArray++ - this is not a valid statement if lineArray is an array; it can't be incremented, because arrays are not modifiable l-values. –  Filipe Gonçalves Oct 27 '13 at 15:01
#include<stdio.h>
#include<string.h>
#include<stdlib.h>

int main(int argc, char *argv[] ){
  int x = 0, lineCount = 0, maxlen = 0;
  char *lineArray[500], line[500];

  FILE *file = fopen( argv[1], "r" ); 
  if (file == NULL){
    printf("Cannot open file\n");
    exit(1);
  }   
  while (x<500 && fgets(line,sizeof(line), file) ){
      lineArray[x] = strdup(line);
      if (strlen(line) > maxlen) {
          maxlen = strlen(line);
      }
      x++;
      lineCount++;
      printf("%s\n", line);
   }
   printf("File %s has %d lines with maximum length of %d characters\n",
   argv[1], lineCount, maxlen);
   fclose(file);
   return 0;
}

Don't see why you need to rewind the file, if you want to look up this function, it's fseek(file,0,0)

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