Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a password change page in my website to which I want to restrict access to an IP range, such as 10.0.0.0 - 10.255.255.255 (10/8 prefix).

When a user enters the page, it will check if the user is in this IP range or not. If the user is in the range, it shows a welcome message; if not, then it will redirect the user to a login page.

share|improve this question

6 Answers 6

An IP address runs from 0x00000000 to 0xFFFFFFFF.

So, check if the users IP is between 0A000000 and 0AFFFFFF (hex).

Update: Demo application:

Given an IP address a.b.c.d you may calculate its value by using:

a*2^24 + b*2^16 + c*2^8 + d*2^1

or shortened to

a*16777216 + b*65536 + c*256 + d

or in hex

a*0x10000 + b*0x1000 + c*0x100 + d

The example below uses this method to find the value of an IP address. This is often included in the socket implementation but seems to have been deprecated by Microsoft (IPAdress.Address).

using System;
using System.Net;

namespace ConsoleApplication1
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            var ip_range_from = IPAddress.Parse("10.0.0.0");
            Console.WriteLine("From IP {0}, long value {1}", ip_range_from, GetLongIP(ip_range_from));            

            var ip_range_to = IPAddress.Parse("10.255.255.255");
            Console.WriteLine("To IP {0}, long value {1}", ip_range_to, GetLongIP(ip_range_to));

            var ip_query_fail = IPAddress.Parse("159.4.1.1");
            Console.WriteLine("ValidIP({0}) returned {1} ",
                ip_query_fail,
                ValidIP(ip_range_from, ip_range_to, ip_query_fail)
                );

            var ip_query_ok = IPAddress.Parse("10.17.110.12");
            Console.WriteLine("ValidIP({0}) returned {1} ",
                ip_query_ok,
                ValidIP(ip_range_from, ip_range_to, ip_query_ok)
                );

            Console.Read(); // wait ;)
        }

        private static bool ValidIP(IPAddress From, IPAddress To, IPAddress IP)
        {
            var LongIP = GetLongIP(IP);            
            return (LongIP > GetLongIP(From) && LongIP < GetLongIP(To));
        }

        private static long GetLongIP(IPAddress IP)
        {
            var bytes = IP.GetAddressBytes();
            long LongIP = bytes[0] * 0x10000 +
                          bytes[1] * 0x1000 +
                          bytes[2] * 0x100 +
                          bytes[3];
            return LongIP;
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Although your answer is valid, there is a minor bug in 'GetLongIP': –  Schmuli Jun 13 '12 at 12:00

Try working with Request.UserHostAdress in some way. Note: for testability, you might want to work around getting the data directly from the Request object.

share|improve this answer

If you want to do this in ASP.NET directly you can look at the HttpRequest object which will contain the User Information that ASP.NET believes is connecting, but this may not be reliable enough for you.

You can also restrict access at the IIS level but this has to be done to a full path or website, not an individual file.

share|improve this answer

You can include custom HttpModule that will check IP for every request and decide whether to send user on page like custom 403 or pass normal response flow.

Read here how to create HttpModule and include it into web application. And to restrict access check HttpRequest.UserHostAddress property in context_BeginRequest redirecting response to some page other than requested.

share|improve this answer
up vote 1 down vote accepted

i have fixed my problem with get user ip address with Request.UserHostAddress then split it if its starts with 10.45. this is my ip and welcome , if not so thats mean this is from the outside then bye him. Easy Solution :) thanx everyone

share|improve this answer

Request.UserHostAddress will give you the IP address of the requestor as a string, so you can just call Request.UserHostAddress.StartsWith("10."). It doesn't tell you if they're behind a proxy, though.

share|improve this answer
    
Down vote, but no comment? I guess working with strings is too easy? –  RickNZ Dec 28 '09 at 9:15

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.