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I have a file that meant to be an utility file. The file should contain alot of static methods.

Should i define the methods inside a class this way:

#utility.py
class utility(object):
    @staticmethods
    def method1(a,b,c):
        pass

    @staticmethods
    def method2(a,b,c):
        pass

or use it like this (without a class):

#utility.py
def method1(a,b,c):
    pass

def method2(a,b,c):
    pass
share|improve this question

closed as primarily opinion-based by mensi, templatetypedef, lserni, Bibhas, ugoren Mar 7 '14 at 4:56

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

4  
Functions are better defined as functions. If you don't need a class, don't make one. – Paul Griffiths Oct 27 '13 at 16:38
    
Thats the answer I was looking for :P – Nirock Oct 27 '13 at 16:39
2  
@PaulGriffiths exactly. @Nirock A strong indicator that a method could/should actually be a function is when it doesn't use its self argument. Tools like pylint even check for that and give you a hint. – Lukas Graf Oct 27 '13 at 16:42
2  
+1 for pylint, every home should have one. – Paul Griffiths Oct 27 '13 at 16:43
    
I like sublime. Should I get rid out of it? – Nirock Oct 27 '13 at 16:43
up vote 10 down vote accepted

The second option is the modus operandi in python. I mean, if all you're doing is importing functions, then you can do something like this:

from utility import some_func

which will import your your function.

Best practice is, if you're using only static functions, then just put them in the global namespace of a separate module, it will make your life a lot easier. What you're trying to do is make objects and just fill them in with static methods. Why do this, when you can just define the functions in a .py file?

In fact, what you're trying to do has been done. You're trying to store away some good utility functions. Well, python-requests, is a third party library that is just adored by the majority of pythonistas just does this. It stores away its good utility functions in a separate module. Here is the example.

share|improve this answer
    
It feels more comfort for me to use it the utility.method1(...) way. Should I force myself doing it this way? I really want to use the best practice. – Nirock Oct 27 '13 at 16:42
    
NEVER use from foo import * in production code. It makes it impossible to track where imports came from, and can overshadow builtin names. – Lukas Graf Oct 27 '13 at 16:43
2  
Best practice is, if you're using only static functions, then just put them in the global namespace of a separate module, it will make your life a lot easier. – Games Brainiac Oct 27 '13 at 16:43
    
@LukasGraf Yea, you're right. Changed it. – Games Brainiac Oct 27 '13 at 16:44
    
open every second if not every package's __init__.py and you'll find from foo import * – alko Oct 27 '13 at 16:49

While this question is a little opinion based, I'd say the second one is better. It reduces redundancy. Using the first method, you will have to do:

import utility
utility.utility.method1(...)

or:

from utility import utility
utility.method1(...)

Using the second one however allows you to simply do:

import utility
utility.method1(...)

or:

from utility import method1
method1(...)

If you are making a class that only contains static methods, my question is "why do you need the class?" It contributes nothing positive here.

share|improve this answer

Classes encapsulate both data, and behavior, so as general rules:

  • If you have something only with data, and no methods, it should probably be a namedtuple, not a class, unless you need to modify that data after creating it.
  • If a function accesses instance data, it should be a method.
  • If a function accesses no instance data, but does access class data, it should be a @classmethod.
  • If a function accesses neither instance data nor class data, it should be a standalone function, unless there's some really compelling reason to make it a @staticmethod.
  • If a class only has one method, or one method in addition to __init__(), then you almost certainly can and should rewrite it as a function.

Classes are really easy to abuse, but the temptation to shove everything into a class should really be avoided. You should use them when they make sense, and avoid using them when they don't.

share|improve this answer
    
Good comprehensive answer. – Games Brainiac Oct 27 '13 at 17:07

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