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What do I have to change to the following code so that the background is red, neither of the 2 ways I tried worked:

alt text

XAML:

<Window x:Class="TestBackground88238.Window1"
    xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
    xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"
    Title="Window1" Height="300" Width="300">
    <StackPanel>

        <TextBlock Text="{Binding Message}" Background="{Binding Background}"/>

        <TextBlock Text="{Binding Message}">
            <TextBlock.Background>
                <SolidColorBrush Color="{Binding Background}"/>
            </TextBlock.Background>
        </TextBlock>

    </StackPanel>
</Window>

Code Behind:

using System.Windows;
using System.ComponentModel;

namespace TestBackground88238
{
    public partial class Window1 : Window, INotifyPropertyChanged
    {

        #region ViewModelProperty: Background
        private string _background;
        public string Background
        {
            get
            {
                return _background;
            }

            set
            {
                _background = value;
                OnPropertyChanged("Background");
            }
        }
        #endregion

        #region ViewModelProperty: Message
        private string _message;
        public string Message
        {
            get
            {
                return _message;
            }

            set
            {
                _message = value;
                OnPropertyChanged("Message");
            }
        }
        #endregion



        public Window1()
        {
            InitializeComponent();
            DataContext = this;

            Background = "Red";
            Message = "This is the title, the background should be " + Background + ".";

        }

        #region INotifiedProperty Block
        public event PropertyChangedEventHandler PropertyChanged;

        protected void OnPropertyChanged(string propertyName)
        {
            PropertyChangedEventHandler handler = PropertyChanged;

            if (handler != null)
            {
                handler(this, new PropertyChangedEventArgs(propertyName));
            }
        }
        #endregion

    }
}

Update 1:

I tried Aviad's answer which didn't seem to work. I can do this manually with x:Name as shown here but I want to be able to bind the color to a INotifyPropertyChanged property, how can I do this?

alt text

XAML:

<Window x:Class="TestBackground88238.Window1"
    xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
    xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"
    Title="Window1" Height="300" Width="300">
    <StackPanel>

        <TextBlock Text="{Binding Message}" Background="{Binding Background}"/>

        <TextBlock x:Name="Message2" Text="This one is manually orange."/>

    </StackPanel>
</Window>

Code Behind:

using System.Windows;
using System.ComponentModel;
using System.Windows.Media;

namespace TestBackground88238
{
    public partial class Window1 : Window, INotifyPropertyChanged
    {

        #region ViewModelProperty: Background
        private Brush _background;
        public Brush Background
        {
            get
            {
                return _background;
            }

            set
            {
                _background = value;
                OnPropertyChanged("Background");
            }
        }
        #endregion

        #region ViewModelProperty: Message
        private string _message;
        public string Message
        {
            get
            {
                return _message;
            }

            set
            {
                _message = value;
                OnPropertyChanged("Message");
            }
        }
        #endregion

        public Window1()
        {
            InitializeComponent();
            DataContext = this;

            Background = new SolidColorBrush(Colors.Red);
            Message = "This is the title, the background should be " + Background + ".";

            Message2.Background = new SolidColorBrush(Colors.Orange);

        }

        #region INotifiedProperty Block
        public event PropertyChangedEventHandler PropertyChanged;

        protected void OnPropertyChanged(string propertyName)
        {
            PropertyChangedEventHandler handler = PropertyChanged;

            if (handler != null)
            {
                handler(this, new PropertyChangedEventArgs(propertyName));
            }
        }
        #endregion

    }
}
share|improve this question

Important: Make sure you're using System.Windows.Media.Brush and not System.Drawing.Brush

They're not compatible and you'll get binding errors. For the color Aquamarine:

System.Windows.Media.Colors.Aquamarine (Colors)

System.Drawing.Color.Aquamarine (Color)

If in doubt use Snoop and inspect the element's background property and look for binding errors - or just in your debug log.

share|improve this answer
1  
This fixed my issue! – ABCD Apr 15 '13 at 4:07

The Background property expects a Brush object, not a string. Change the type of the property to Brush and initialize it thus:

Background = new SolidColorBrush(Colors.Red);
share|improve this answer
    
that didn't seem to work for me, I posted the code above (update 1) – Edward Tanguay Dec 25 '09 at 23:09
2  
be sure to use SolidColorBrush from System.Windows.Media and not SolidBrush from System.Drawing – Simon_Weaver Nov 2 '12 at 19:58
1  
I know I'm a bit late to the party but it's Colors.Red, not Color.Red. Was a bit confused by your answer till I found that one out. – DanteTheEgregore Jul 15 '13 at 21:16

Here you've got a copy-paste code:

class NameToBackgroundConverter : IValueConverter
    {
        public object Convert(object value, Type targetType, object parameter, CultureInfo culture)
        {
            if(value.ToString() == "System")
            {
                return new SolidColorBrush(System.Windows.Media.Colors.Aqua);
            }else
            {
                return new SolidColorBrush(System.Windows.Media.Colors.Blue);
            }
        }

        public object ConvertBack(object value, Type targetType, object parameter, CultureInfo culture)
        {
            return null;
        }
    }
share|improve this answer
    
Changing from using raw colors to using SolidColorBrush solved it for me. thanks – frostymarvelous Mar 14 '14 at 0:41

I figured this out, it was just a naming conflict issue: if you use TheBackground instead of Background it works as posted in the first example. The property Background was interfering with the Window property background.

share|improve this answer

I recommend reading the following blog post about debugging data binding: http://beacosta.com/blog/?p=52

And for this concrete issue: If you look at the compiler warnings, you will notice that you property has been hiding the Window.Background property (or Control or whatever class the property defines).

share|improve this answer
    
yes, the compiler warning was how I discovered it, thanks for the link, good information there – Edward Tanguay Dec 25 '09 at 23:43

The xaml code:

<Grid x:Name="Message2">
   <TextBlock Text="This one is manually orange."/>
</Grid>

The c# code:

protected override void OnNavigatedTo(NavigationEventArgs e)
    {
        CreateNewColorBrush();
    }

    private void CreateNewColorBrush()
    {

        SolidColorBrush my_brush = new SolidColorBrush(Color.FromArgb(255, 255, 215, 0));
        Message2.Background = my_brush;

    }

This one works in windows 8 store app. Try and see. Good luck !

share|improve this answer

You can still use "Background" as the property name, as long as you give your window a name and use this name on the "Source" of the Binding.

share|improve this answer

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