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Why won't my R function return or print a plot? The code is below. All of the code seems to work fine, except for the plot. No matter what I do, I can't get R to create the plot when the function is called. Looking around online, I can't find any reason why this wouldn't work.

powerc.fun <- function(n,sigma,r){

a <- 0.05
d <- seq(-20,20,2)

power <- rep(NA,length(d))
p.lab <- rep(NA,length(d))

for (j in 1:length(d)){

  mu1 <- 110
  mu2 <- mu1-d[j]  

  reject <- rep(NA,r)

  for (i in 1:r){

    sample1 <- rnorm(n,mu1,sigma)
    sample2 <- rnorm(n,mu2,sigma)

    sample.t <- t.test(sample1,sample2)
    p.val <- sample.t[3]

    reject[i] <- p.val<a 

    power[j] <- sum(reject)/length(reject)
    p.lab[j] <- paste('d=',d[j],sep='')

  }}

d.power <- cbind(d,power)

return(d.power)

p.plot <- plot(d.power[,1], d.power[,2], type="l", xlab=bquote(H[a]), ylab="Power", main="Power Calculations for Two Sample T Test")

print(p.plot)
return(p.plot)

}

Any ideas?

share|improve this question
    
You don't need return if you're calling from the top level (i.e., from the console). If you want to display the plot, just call the plot line without storing it, print-ing it, or return-ing it. –  Thomas Oct 27 '13 at 18:55
    
    
@Thomas: But I'm not calling from the top level, it is embedded within a function call. If I call the function, it doesn't plot at all. Even without print/return. –  Ryan Simmons Oct 27 '13 at 19:15
    
@B.Mr.W.: Can you actual explain what in that link is supposed to help me? The answer to that question says to use "print", which I already explicitly says doesn't work. –  Ryan Simmons Oct 27 '13 at 19:16
3  
Are you purposefully returning d.power prior to reaching the plot? Or is that simply part of your testing that you forgot to remove when posting your question? –  Ricardo Saporta Oct 27 '13 at 19:24

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

This works. As suggested, you can save more than one object by using a list:

powerc.fun <- function(n,sigma,r){

a <- 0.05
d <- seq(-20,20,2)

power <- rep(NA,length(d))
p.lab <- rep(NA,length(d))

for (j in 1:length(d)){

  mu1 <- 110
  mu2 <- mu1-d[j]  

  reject <- rep(NA,r)

  for (i in 1:r){

    sample1 <- rnorm(n,mu1,sigma)
    sample2 <- rnorm(n,mu2,sigma)

    sample.t <- t.test(sample1,sample2)
    p.val <- sample.t[3]

    reject[i] <- p.val<a 

    power[j] <- sum(reject)/length(reject)
    p.lab[j] <- paste('d=',d[j],sep='')

  }}

d.power <- cbind(d,power)
p.plot <- plot(d.power[,1], d.power[,2], type="l", xlab=bquote(H[a]), ylab="Power", main="Power Calculations for Two Sample T Test")

return(list(p.plot, d.power))

}

# prints the plot and saves d.power values
output <- powerc.fun(100,0.1,10)

# d.power values
output[[2]]

Probably you prefer just to save d.power and then call it for plotting the graph:

powerc.fun <- function(n,sigma,r){

a <- 0.05
d <- seq(-20,20,2)

power <- rep(NA,length(d))
p.lab <- rep(NA,length(d))

for (j in 1:length(d)){

  mu1 <- 110
  mu2 <- mu1-d[j]  

  reject <- rep(NA,r)

  for (i in 1:r){

    sample1 <- rnorm(n,mu1,sigma)
    sample2 <- rnorm(n,mu2,sigma)

    sample.t <- t.test(sample1,sample2)
    p.val <- sample.t[3]

    reject[i] <- p.val<a 

    power[j] <- sum(reject)/length(reject)
    p.lab[j] <- paste('d=',d[j],sep='')

  }}

d.power <- cbind(d,power)

return(d.power)

}

# saves d.power
output <- powerc.fun(100,0.1,10)

# plot
p.plot <- plot(output[,1], output[,2], type="l", xlab=bquote(H[a]), ylab="Power", main="Power Calculations for Two Sample T Test")
share|improve this answer

A call to "return()" ends the function call, so anything after it is ignored

Try getting rid of

return (d.power)

or moving it to after you define and print the plot.

On a related note, you can't return two objects from one function. Pick one or put them in a list and return the list.

share|improve this answer

In base R you can save plots to disk. I don't believe you can save them to disk.
Use ggplot2 instead

library(ggplot2)

.
.
.

p.plot <- qplot(as.data.frame(d.power), aes(x=d, y=power)) + 
                 geom_line() + 
                 labs(x=bquote(H[a]), y="Power", title="Power Calculations for Two Sample T Test")
                 # double check the xlab, it might be incorrect 


return(p.plot)
share|improve this answer
    
You sort of can with recordPlot ... –  Matthew Plourde Oct 27 '13 at 21:01
    
Thanks @MatthewPlourde, I was unfamiliar with that function. It doesn't seem like you "sort of can" but absolutely can, haha ;) Post that as an answer? –  Ricardo Saporta Oct 27 '13 at 21:38

Your code doesn't work on my where variable r is missing, but here is how I call a function and return a plot object.

library(ggplot2)
data(mtcars)

my.plot <- function() {
 result <- ggplot(data=mtcars, aes(x=wt, y=mpg)) + geom_point() 
 # you can forget the return below because R will take the last expression which is result as return value
 # return(result)
}

a <- my.plot()
> class(a)
[1] "gg"     "ggplot"
> a 

enter image description here

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