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I have some questions relating to the visual content which can be seen in the attachment (use CTRL-+ in Firefox to see enlarged visual content with the code that generated it on the left hand side). Let us name the visual content listed with the numbers 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6 from top to bottom. I have several questions about this scenario, for instance:

A. How is line-height being measured for boxes containing just a single line and how does it combine with the box height (and any font properties) to produce the visual results?

B. How come in picture 1 there is some yellow space on the very top of the picture, (zoom in to see it) which is missing from picture 2 and 3? And where does this space come from, as I don't appear to have specified it anywhere. How come picture 1 touches the top of the box while pictures 2 and 3 don't?

C. How come the height of box 2 differs from the height of box 5 (and the height of box 3 differs from the height of box 6). After all, line-height is the same in both cases, and besides vertical-align being specified for the nested image, nothing else is different. So how does specifying vertical-align or not change the outer box's height?

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
<head>
<meta charset="utf-8">
<title>Untitled Document</title>
</head>
<body>
  <p style="height: 200px; width: 200px; background: yellow; line-height: 200px;">
    <img src="images/jellyfish.jpg" width="100" height="100" /></span>
  </p>
  <p style="width: 200px; background: yellow; line-height: 100px;">
    <img src="images/jellyfish.jpg" width="100" height="100" />
  </p>
  <p style="width: 100px; background: yellow; line-height: 100px;">
    <img src="images/jellyfish.jpg" width="100" height="100" />
  </p>
  <hr />
  <p style="width: 200px; background: yellow; line-height: 399px;">
    <img style="vertical-align: middle;" src="images/jellyfish.jpg" width="100" height="100" />
  </p>
   <p style="width: 200px; background: yellow; line-height: 100px;">
    <img style="vertical-align: middle;" src="images/jellyfish.jpg" width="100" height="100" />
  </p>
  <p style="width: 100px; background: yellow; line-height: 100px;">
    <img style="vertical-align: middle;" src="images/jellyfish.jpg" width="100" height="100" />
  </p>
</body>
</html>

Six CSS rules and Six Corresponding Layouts

The CSS 2.1 spec at http://www.w3.org/TR/CSS2/visudet.html in section 10.8.1 says:

Note. When there is only one value of 'line-height' for all inline boxes in a block container box and they are all in the same font (and there are no replaced elements, inline-block elements, etc.), the above will ensure that baselines of successive lines are exactly 'line-height' apart. This is important when columns of text in different fonts have to be aligned, for example in a table.

D. OK so line-height is the height between the font baselines on different lines, thus contributing to space between lines. But what does this line-height do if there is only one line? I guess what the spec doesn't say is that when considering the very top line, the line-height will extend to the top of the container, creating extra space at the top.

E. Would it be correct to say that if I have an image on the line, the (font) baseline will be aligned to the lower edge of the image's content box, i.e., the bottom of the image displayed in the box generated by the box model around the image? Or is it also possible to achieve other effects, and if so than how?

Thanks.

share|improve this question
    
I've added the text AAA after each of the img tags in the html source file. I can then highlight the img tag name and use the Live view option in DreamWeaver CC by clicking on the Live button at the top and edit the vertical-alignment property in the properties panel. Dreamweaver is nice here because you can select the valid values from a list (unlike in firebug where you have to type everything in). I've experimented with the baseline | sub | super | top | text-top | middle | bottom | text-bottom in example 4 above and can now see how this parameter works. – John Sonderson Oct 27 '13 at 21:03
    
The reasoning in part D. is wrong. Please ignore it. – John Sonderson Oct 27 '13 at 21:03
    
I've played around a little bit more using example 4. Part E is also wrong. When borders, margins, and padding are specified these are also taken into account. If vertical-align is set to baseline, which is the default, and an inline replaced element, say an image, appears along the text contained in that text line, than the bottom of the margin box will be aligned to the baseline. – John Sonderson Oct 27 '13 at 21:07
    
Hello. I've figured out the answer to question B., perhaps someone else can improve on what I write below. First of all, the font baseline in scenario 1. is slightly lower than 100px from the top of the yellow box. Since the image is 100px tall, and by default is aligned to this baseline (which is a font metric specified in the font file used), some space appears on the top as displayed – John Sonderson Oct 27 '13 at 21:11
1  
That should probably be a whole new question. It probably has a different answer for each different font format, ttf, otf, woff etc. Type light opens ttf and otf files and under "font metrics" shows several values that could be being used. – Alohci Nov 3 '13 at 16:05
up vote 0 down vote accepted

I've decided to answer this question in order to bring the discussion to an end given that the answer to the details for this post can be found in the above comments.

Regards.

share|improve this answer
2  
You'll want to move the details in the comments into the answer here instead since they answer your question. – BoltClock Dec 10 '13 at 9:36

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