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I wrote a java program that is able to send/receive messages via a multicast address. My code for multicast sender:

public boolean multicastSender(DataTransferObject message) {

        try {

            InetAddress group = InetAddress.getByName(ip);
            MulticastSocket s = new MulticastSocket(port);
            s.joinGroup(group);

            String msg = jsh.dtoToJsonString(message);
            DatagramPacket data = new DatagramPacket(
                    msg.getBytes(), msg.length(), group, port);
            s.send(data);

            s.leaveGroup(group);
            return true;

        } catch (IOException e) {
            System.out.println(e.toString());
            e.printStackTrace();
            return false;
        }
    }

My code for multicast receiver:

public DataTransferObject multicastReceiver() {
    try {
        InetAddress group = InetAddress.getByName(ip);
        MulticastSocket s = new MulticastSocket(port);
        s.joinGroup(group);

        byte[] buffer = new byte[1000 * 1024];
        DatagramPacket data = new DatagramPacket(buffer, buffer.length);
        String jsonData;
        DataTransferObject dto;
        while (true) {
            s.receive(data);
            jsonData = new String(buffer, 0, data.getLength());
            dto = jsh.dtoFromJson(jsonData);

            if (dto == null) {
                continue;
            } else {

                return dto;

            }
        }
    } catch (IOException e) {
        System.out.println(e.toString());
        e.printStackTrace();
        return null;
    }
} 

My program has 4 parallel threads that listen and receive messages from four different multicast addresses (224.0.0.[1->4]) and ports [66601->66604]. In the test, I run two programs at the same time to test the communication between them. Yet I discovered that sometimes, program A sends a message to a multicast address, in a correct case, A will also receive it and so will B. But sometimes, I see that A announced that it sent the message but after that, neither A or B receive it again. I run the test on my local machine (Mac OS 10.9 with core 2 duo) . Should this problem because of my computer or something else?
Thank you very much.

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2 Answers 2

UDP, which I guess underlies your multicast implementation, does not guarantee delivery. The receiver or network will drop packets when overloaded. You'll need a higher-level protocol to ensure delivery (google reliable multicast).

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I've seen this happen in a Windows environment. I understand that it's because the network layer is separate from the JVM.

What this means is one JVM may read and process/discard this message, yet other JVM's won't read the same message as the network layer has already delivered the UDP message to the first consumer, no matter how many JVM's have subscribed to the same group. This may or may not be a bug in the operating system - it's very subjective. Personally I think the OS should track registrants in order to replicate the delivery, as that's the intention of clients - it's a bit misleading to think otherwise given that an application is joining a group to receive multicasts. The operating system should take this into consideration.

I have come to this conclusion through empirical evidence, and may not be true for other platforms.

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