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I'm thinking about using Linq to NHibernate in an upcoming project, so I'd like some feedback about it. I found this identical question asked in February, and it seemed that Linq to NHibernate was not very mature at this time... Has it improved since then ? Has anyone used it in real life applications ?

Thanks for your feedback

PS: please do not close as duplicate : the existing question is almost 1 year old and I'm asking about the current status of the product...

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Surely the better approach (and one in-line with the motivations behind SO as articulated by Jeff and Joel on the podcast) would be to invigorate the original question and get it updated with current information - replace or downvote the obsolete information and promote the current stuff. –  Bevan Dec 26 '09 at 3:14
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That would be quite unpractical, because I don't know which if the answers are obsolete. Also, a question wich already has several answers is less likely to get new ones... –  Thomas Levesque Dec 26 '09 at 4:03
    
Why don't you have a look at the unit tests? –  Paco Dec 26 '09 at 9:37

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Ayende (one of the more vocal contributors to NHibernate) noted in a blog post this week that NHibernate's LINQ support is somewhat lacking (as compared to Microsoft's Entity Framework). I don't believe much has changed in the last year in the production code base. He does note that the next version of NHibernate will improve on this support.

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Agreed. He and Rob Conery also mirror those comments in the Tekpub series on NHibernate... –  JP. Dec 26 '09 at 4:35
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Thanks. Do you have any idea when the next version will be available ? No date is given in the roadmap. From the NH blog, it seems that version 3.0 is well under way, so perhaps we can expect a release soon... –  Thomas Levesque Dec 26 '09 at 12:07
    
NHibernate 3.0 should be available this summer (June 2010). –  asbjornu May 10 '10 at 18:55

Linq to NHibernate is OK most of the time, but you need a fallback option.

I use it in a large project as the default query language as I expect it to become more mature soon, and I especially like its agnosicism towards the underlying framework - you can use it if you know the basics about O/R mappers and Linq; you don't need to be super-familiar with NHibernate in special. The other options for writing queries, especially the criteria query API, pose some extra learning effort. For most of the features, complex queries are not required, and Linq to NHibernate is good for some Wheres and OrderBys.

However, there are still odd cases of failure where the query itself is OK, but the generated SQL just is not. In these cases I don't spend time examining what's up, but fall back to the criteria query API.

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Please refer to http://nhforge.org/blogs/nhibernate/archive/2009/12/17/linq-to-nhibernate-progress-report-a-christmas-gift.aspx for the latest info

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Thanks, I had seen that page too, but I'm looking for feedback from real world experience... –  Thomas Levesque Jan 8 '10 at 23:46
    
Likewise - did you arrive at a firm conclusion either way? I'm facing a similar quandry to yourself. The post from Steve is interesting. –  Steve Feb 1 '10 at 19:49

Hey I follow Steve Strong, as from what I understand, he is the main developer of this project.

here is his latest post "Using the new Linq to NH Provider and migrating from the old one " http://blogs.imeta.co.uk/sstrong/archive/2009/12/16/824.aspx note it was just after the NHForge latest post on this topic.

To get this version look at the HornGet link provied in the post

I looks really promising

bones

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