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im new in Scala and im Looking for a way to do something like

val list = List(1, 0, 1, 2, 3, 1, 2, 0, 1, 2, 0, 3, 2, 0, 1)

mylist.sortWith(_ > _).partition(_ == 1).flatten

Problem is that partition() yields a tuple of lists but i need a list of lists.

The goal is to have this job done in one line without using other variable, optimisation in not a requirement.

A dirty/stupid way to achieve what im trying to do would be:

List(mylist.sortWith(_ > _).partition(_ == 1)._1, mylist.sortWith(_ > _).partition(_ == 1)._2).flatten

I am also wondering if i can cast the output of partition() to flatten it

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1  
So you want a final output of List(1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 3, 3, 2, 2, 2, 2, 0, 0, 0, 0)? That's what I get running your "dirty/stupid" approach. –  Vidya Oct 27 '13 at 23:34
    
yes, but output is not really important :) –  mike Oct 27 '13 at 23:39
    
Pattern matching. See stackoverflow.com/q/7129849/770361 –  Luigi Plinge Oct 28 '13 at 5:25

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

It seems like a missing feature of Scala, "a method to convert a tuple to a list", but you can use productIterator to get there...sort of. ProductIterator returns a List[Any] so it's rather ugly but you could do something like:

  val list = List(1, 0, 1, 2, 3, 1, 2, 0, 1, 2, 0, 3, 2, 0, 1)

  list
    .sortBy(-_)
    .partition( _ == 1 )
    .productIterator.map( _.asInstanceOf[List[Int]] )
    .toList.flatten

 // Results in: List(1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 3, 3, 2, 2, 2, 2, 0, 0, 0, 0)

Just for a display of virtuosity you could also arrive at the same answer with

list.sortBy(-_).foldLeft(List[Int]()){case (a,1) => 1 +: a case (a,v) => a :+ v}

or:

list.sortBy(-_).sortWith((a,b) => a == 1)    
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1. Instead of map you can use .asInstanceOf[Iterator[List[Int]]]. 2. Your sortWith doesn't work as intended –  Luigi Plinge Oct 28 '13 at 14:47
    
Right list.sortWith((a,b) => a == 1 || a > b) isn't working but the 2 other solution are nice thx @LuigiPlinge I dont understand yet why do i have to cast to Iterator[List[Int]] but ill take a look at it. thx too –  mike Oct 28 '13 at 15:10
    
@LuigiPlinge are right and I need new glasses...I changed the example but alas it's not so clever. –  Keith Pinson Oct 28 '13 at 20:01
    
@mike the "cast", _.asInstanceOf[List[Int]], is needed to get the flatten method to work. –  Keith Pinson Oct 28 '13 at 20:07

Here's one way to do it:

list.sorted.groupBy(_ == 1).values.toList
  • sorted() simply sorts the list in ascending order (doable since it just contains Ints)
  • groupBy() converts this to a map of true -> 1's, false -> all else
  • values() returns the map's values
  • toList() converts this collection of the map's values into your desired list.
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Why use sorted at all ? –  Shrey Oct 28 '13 at 17:38
    
The original question sorted the list. Or do you mean another sort method would have been better here? –  swartzrock Nov 10 '13 at 0:50
    
Oh sorry.. my bad! I didn't notice that ! –  Shrey Nov 10 '13 at 6:33

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