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Not sure why this code is not working. When I click on the active link the text should switch and keep doing so all the time. This code just runs once and then the onclick has no effect. Example on JSFiddle. Could you please explain why this did not work with your solution shown?

<div id="imageId">Image A, <a id="imageB" href="#">Image B</a></div>


$(document).ready(function() {
    $('#imageB').click(function(event) {
        "use strict";
        alert("imageB");

        event.preventDefault();
        $('#imageId').html("Image B, <a id='imageA' href='#'>Image A</a>").show();
    });
});

$(document).ready(function() {    
    $('#imageA').click(function(event) {
        "use strict";
        alert("imageA");

        event.preventDefault();
        $('#imageId').html("Image A, <a id='imageB' href='#'>Image B</a>").show();
    });
});
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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Use event delegation ...this allows for elements that are changed out or don't exist at all at run time. WHen you remove an element, all events bound directly to it are lost, even if you replace it with identical same html in same place withing page

$(document).on('click', '#imageA', function(event){
/* your code*/
});

You only have to call this once when page loads and regardless how many times you replace the element it will run same code. What it is doing is binding the event handler to a higher level up the tree ( in this case document), and whenever that higher level is clciked, if the target is the selector, it will fire.

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When the document is ready there's no element with the ID "imageA". You add it after you click "imageB", so it is pretty straight forward why it is not working.

In order to get your code to work call a function right after you change the HTML, allowing the javascript to know who "imageA" is.

Here's your example fixed, of course you can still refactor the code so you don't have to copy-paste the same thing twice:

http://jsfiddle.net/Waclock/JmmxJ/6/

$(document).ready(function() {
    reloadLinks();
});
function reloadLinks(){
    $('#imageB').click(function(event) {
        "use strict";
        alert("imageB");

        event.preventDefault();
        $('#imageId').html("Image B, <a id='imageA' href='#'>Image A</a>").show();
        reloadLinks();
    });

    $('#imageA').click(function(event) {
        "use strict";
        alert("imageA");

        event.preventDefault();
        $('#imageId').html("Image A, <a id='imageB' href='#'>Image B</a>").show();
        reloadLinks();
    });
}
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1  
Makes sense. Thanks. –  java_dude Oct 28 '13 at 0:49
    
not a good practice... if only one element is replaced, can end up with multiple click handlers on the other. Event delegation is far safer and predictable –  charlietfl Oct 28 '13 at 0:52
    
@charlietfl, I agree with you. You design is more elegant and robust. –  java_dude Oct 28 '13 at 1:08

Try:

    $('#imageB').on("click", function(event) {
        "use strict";
        alert("imageB");

        event.preventDefault();
        $('#imageId').html("Image B, <a id='imageA' href='#'>Image A</a>").show();
    });
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