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I have to send parameter to a constructor of a new class. the parameter i sent is generic. inside the constructor I have to use a field of it (id). but i cannot use it directly, then i want to cast it before using. but It said cannot convert type T to my specific type.

for example

    public class Pet<T>
    {
        foodType foodType; // enum
        public Pet(T sample)
        {
           if(sample.GetType() == typeof(Dog)
           {
              var pet = (Dog)pet; // there is an error.
              foodType = FoodType.Milk;
           } 
           if(sample.GetType() == typeof(Cat)
           {
              var pet = (Cat)pet; // there is an error.
              foodType = FoodType.Fish;
           }     
        }

    }

how to cast it? or it has no way to do.

I have edit the sample code. Is it better?

share|improve this question
4  
Your design is horribly flawed. Can you give us a proper example? Or is this it? –  Simon Whitehead Oct 28 '13 at 7:03
1  
Well what do you expect the cast to do? What will the actual value be? If it's not a Dog, how do you expect the conversion to happen? And do you even have a non-generic Dog type to cast it to? Your question is very unclear. –  Jon Skeet Oct 28 '13 at 7:03
1  
Do you really need generics? Seems like base class or interface could work fine. Speaking of your code sample which is really unclear to say exactly what you are doing. –  Leri Oct 28 '13 at 7:07
2  
Maybe you'd be better off explaining what you're aiming to achieve, in specific terms. I don't think the design above can express what you're trying to do. –  Baldrick Oct 28 '13 at 7:07
3  
I've heard about Dog<byte> or Dog<float>, but can't imagine what a Dog<DateTime> would be like... –  Corak Oct 28 '13 at 7:10

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can use 'where' word. Like this:

public class Dog<T> where T: IHasId

This means that T must be inherited from IHasId interfase

share|improve this answer
    
But still will he be able to get id, when using this solution? –  Tafari Oct 28 '13 at 7:35
    
Yes, if it presents in IHasId interfase –  ant Oct 28 '13 at 7:44
    
@ant Type constraint would be more correct term. Also I guess OP does not need generic at all. :) –  Leri Oct 28 '13 at 7:58
    
@Leri apparently he doesn't but when I suggested this in my answer got downvoted three times, so I would not suggest it. –  Tafari Oct 28 '13 at 8:00
    
Thank you, I use this way with where T : baseclass –  user2617677 Oct 28 '13 at 8:02

You are missing the point of generics. You can solve this problem far better without generics:

public interface IPetFoodChoice
{
    FoodType preferedFoodType { get; }
}

public class Dog : IPetFoodChoice
{
    public FoodType preferedFoodType { get { return FoodType.Milk; } }
}

public class Cat : IPetFoodChoice
{
    public FoodType preferedFoodType { get { return FoodType.Fish; } }
}

public class Pet
{
    private FoodType _foodType;

    public Pet(IPetFoodChoice sample)
    {
        _foodType = sample.preferedFoodType;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Was about to post almost the same. Just one note OP might want to have getter for passed object. –  Leri Oct 28 '13 at 7:55

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