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I have a MySQL table with 3 fields:

  • Location
  • Variable
  • Value

I frequently use the following query:

SELECT * 
  FROM Table 
 WHERE Location = '$Location' 
   AND Variable = '$Variable' 
ORDER BY Location, Variable

I have over a million rows in my table and queries are somewhat slow. Would it increase query speed if I added a field VariableLocation, which is the Variable and the Location combined? I would be able to change the query to:

SELECT * 
  FROM Table 
 WHERE VariableLocation = '$Location$Variable' 
ORDER BY VariableLocation
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4 Answers 4

up vote -1 down vote accepted

Correction Update:

Courtesy: @paxdiablo:

A column in the table will make no difference. All you need is an index over both columns and the MySQL engine will use that. Adding a column in the table is actually worse than that since it breaks 3NF and wastes space. See http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.0/en/mysql-indexes.html which states: SELECT * FROM tbl_name WHERE col1=val1 AND col2=val2; If a multiple-column index exists on col1 and col2, the appropriate rows can be fetched directly.

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-1 - can you explain why this would happen in terms of how MySQL manages data or optimizes queries? –  kdgregory Dec 28 '09 at 17:27
    
no i can't explain to you at least because i can't vote you down initially like you have done !!! –  Sarfraz Dec 30 '09 at 6:26
    
If you can't explain something in terms of known behavior, then you're not giving a real answer. You have no basis on which to say "will definitely increase performance," because you don't know why it would do so. As it is, you told the OP exactly what s/he wanted to hear, which at best is spreading harmless superstition, at worst will make his/her queries perform more poorly. Compare that to the other posters, who actually gave reasoned explanations for adding an index. –  kdgregory Dec 31 '09 at 13:30
    
@kdgregory my experience tell me this, when you perform a benchmark, you come up with results. thanks –  Sarfraz Dec 31 '09 at 13:42
    
This answer is complete rubbish. A column in the table will make no difference. All you need is an index over both columns and the MySQL engine will use that. Adding a column in the table is actually worse than that since it breaks 3NF and wastes space. See dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.0/en/mysql-indexes.html which states: SELECT * FROM tbl_name WHERE col1=val1 AND col2=val2; If a multiple-column index exists on col1 and col2, the appropriate rows can be fetched directly. –  paxdiablo Feb 24 '12 at 7:46

I would add a covering index, for columns location and variable:

ALTER TABLE 
  ADD INDEX (variable, location);

...though if the variable & location pairs are unique, they should be the primary key.

Combining the columns will likely cause more grief than it's worth. For example, if you need to pull out records by location or variable only, you'd have to substring the values in a subquery.

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Try adding an index which covers the two fields you should then still get a performance boost but also keep your data understandable because it wouldn't seem like the two columns should be combine but you are just doing it to get performance.

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I would advise against combining the fields. Instead, create an index that covers both fields in the same order as your ORDER BY clause:

ALTER TABLE tablename ADD INDEX (location, variable);

Combined indices and keys are only used in queries that involve all fields of the index or a subset of these fields read from left to right. Or in other words: If you use location in a WHERE condition, this index would be used, but ordering by variable would not use the index.

When trying to optimize queries, the EXPLAIN command is quite helpful: EXPLAIN in mysql docs

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