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I used JSLint on a JavaScript file of mine. It threw the error:

for( ind in evtListeners ) {

Problem at line 41 character 9: The body of a for in should be wrapped in an if statement to filter unwanted properties from the prototype.

What does this mean?

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7 Answers 7

up vote 212 down vote accepted

First of all, never use a for in loop to enumerate over an array. Never. Use good old for(var i = 0; i<arr.length; i++).

The reason behind this is the following: each object in JavaScript has a special field called prototype. Everything you add to that field is going to be accessible on every object of that type. Suppose you want all arrays to have a cool new function called filter_0 that will filter zeroes out.

Array.prototype.filter_0 = function() {
    var res = [];
    for (var i = 0; i < this.length; i++) {
        if (this[i] != 0) {
            res.push(this[i]);
        }
    }
    return res;
};

console.log([0, 5, 0, 3, 0, 1, 0].filter_0());
//prints [5,3,1]

This is a standard way to extend objects and add new methods. Lots of libraries do this. However, let's look at how for in works now:

var listeners = ["a", "b", "c"];
for (o in listeners) {
    console.log(o);
}
//prints:
//  0
//  1
//  2
//  filter_0

Do you see? It suddenly thinks filter_0 is another array index. Of course, it is not really a numeric index, but for in enumerates through object fields, not just numeric indexes. So we're now enumerating through every numeric index and filter_0. But filter_0 is not a field of any particular array object, every array object has this property now.

Luckily, all objects have a hasOwnProperty method, which checks if this field really belongs to the object itself or if it is simply inherited from the prototype chain and thus belongs to all the objects of that type.

for (o in listeners) {
    if (listeners.hasOwnProperty(o)) {
       console.log(o);
    }
}
 //prints:
 //  0
 //  1
 //  2

Note, that although this code works as expected for arrays, you should never, never, use for in and for each in for arrays. Remember that for in enumerates the fields of an object, not array indexes or values.

var listeners = ["a", "b", "c"];
listeners.happy = "Happy debugging";

for (o in listeners) {
    if (listeners.hasOwnProperty(o)) {
       console.log(o);
    }
}

 //prints:
 //  0
 //  1
 //  2
 //  happy
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15  
You should not use for in to iterate over arrays because the language does not garauntee the order in which for in will enumerate over an array. It might not be in numeric order. In addition, if you use the `for(i=0;i<array.length;i++) style construct, you can be sure that you're only iterating numeric indexes in order, and no alphanumeric properties. –  Breton Dec 26 '09 at 11:49
    
thanks for the detailed answer :) –  jrharshath Dec 29 '09 at 9:53
    
Thanks! I'll save this as a reference. –  nyuszika7h Jan 10 '11 at 21:52
    
I found myself looking at this answer again because I was convinced that this bit of JSLint was broken. I had code that was roughly: for (o in listeners) { if (listeners.hasOwnProperty(i)) { console.log(o); } } The problem is that I had a bug, I'd switched variable names i to o and missed a reference. JSLint is smart enough to make sure that you're checking hasOwnProperty for the correct property on the correct object. –  drewish Apr 21 '11 at 18:19
6  
for in, however, is fine to iterate over an object's property. The OP never said the for in was applied to an Array. The hasOwnProperty is best practice, however there are cases where you don't want it - for example if an object extends another, and you want to list both the objects and the 'parent' one's properties. –  gotofritz Apr 18 '12 at 10:26

Douglas Crockford, the author of jslint has written (and spoken) about this issue many times. There's a section on this page of his website which covers this:

for Statement

A for class of statements should have the following form:

for (initialization; condition; update) {
    statements
}

for (variable in object) {
    if (filter) {
        statements
    } 
}

The first form should be used with arrays and with loops of a predeterminable number of iterations.

The second form should be used with objects. Be aware that members that are added to the prototype of the object will be included in the enumeration. It is wise to program defensively by using the hasOwnProperty method to distinguish the true members of the object:

for (variable in object) {
    if (object.hasOwnProperty(variable)) {
        statements
    } 
}

Crockford also has a video series on YUI theater where he talks about this. Crockford's series of videos/talks about javascript are a must see if you're even slightly serious about javascript.

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Vava's answer is on the mark. If you use jQuery, then the $.each() function takes care of this, hence it is safer to use.

$.each(evtListeners, function(index, elem) {
    // your code
});
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4  
If performance is any consideration here, I wouldn't recommend using $.each (or underscore.js's _.each) if you can get away with the raw for loop. jsperf has a few eye-opening comparison tests that are worth running. –  nickb Dec 5 '11 at 5:31
2  
This ( jsperf.com/each-vs-each-vs-for-in/3 ) is more realistic because it employs the basic proto filter –  dvdrtrgn Jul 5 '12 at 21:30

@all - everything in JavaScript is an object (), so statements like "only use this on objects" are a bit misleading. In addition JavaScript is not strongly typed so that 1 == "1" is true (although 1 === "1" is not, Crockford is big on this). When it comes to the progromatic concept of arrays in JS, typing is important in the definition.

@Brenton - No need to be a terminology dictator; "associative array", "dictionary", "hash", "object", these programming concepts all apply to one structure in JS. It is name (key, index) value pairs, where the value can be any other object (strings are objects too)

So, new Array() is the same as []

new Object() is roughly similar to {}

var myarray = [];

Creates a structure that is an array with the restriction that all indexes (aka keys) must be a whole number. It also allows for auto assigning of new indexes via .push()

var myarray = ["one","two","three"];

Is indeed best dealt with via for(initialization;condition;update){

But what about:

var myarray = [];
myarray[100] = "foo";
myarray.push("bar");

Try this:

var myarray = [], i;
myarray[100] = "foo";
myarray.push("bar");
myarray[150] = "baz";
myarray.push("qux");
alert(myarray.length);
for(i in myarray){
    if(myarray.hasOwnProperty(i)){  
        alert(i+" : "+myarray[i]);
    }
}

Perhaps not the best usage of an array, but just an illustration that things are not always clearcut.

If you know your keys, and definitely if they are not whole numbers, your only array like structure option is the object.

var i, myarray= {
   "first":"john",
   "last":"doe",
   100:"foo",
   150:"baz"
};
for(i in myarray){
    if(myarray.hasOwnProperty(i)){  
        alert(i+" : "+myarray[i]);
    }
}
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"Only use this on objects" means don't use it on Arrays or anything else that extends Object, otherwise, as you point out, it would be very silly since everything extends Object –  Juan Mendes Apr 13 '12 at 17:54
    
'"associative array", "dictionary", "hash", "object", these programming concepts all apply to one structure in JS.' No. They are different concepts from different languages, with similarities to each other. But if you go about assuming that they are /exactly the same/ and to be used in the same way, for the same purposes, you are setting yourself up for making some really stupid mistakes you could avoid by being less ignorant about how the language you're using works. –  Breton Dec 20 '12 at 5:02

Surely it's a little extreme to say

...never use a for in loop to enumerate over an array. Never. Use good old for(var i = 0; i<arr.length; i++)

?

It is worth highlighting the section in the Douglas Crockford extract

...The second form should be used with objects...

If you require an associative array ( aka hashtable / dictionary ) where keys are named instead of numerically indexed, you will have to implement this as an object, e.g. var myAssocArray = {key1: "value1", key2: "value2"...};.

In this case myAssocArray.length will come up null (because this object doesn't have a 'length' property), and your i < myAssocArray.length won't get you very far. In addition to providing greater convenience, I would expect associative arrays to offer performance advantages in many situations, as the array keys can be useful properties (i.e. an array member's ID property or name), meaning you don't have to iterate through a lengthy array repeatedly evaluating if statements to find the array entry you're after.

Anyway, thanks also for the explanation of the JSLint error messages, I will use the 'isOwnProperty' check now when interating through my myriad associative arrays!

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You are deeply confused. There is no such thing as "associative arrays" in javascript. That is strictly a php concept. –  Breton Jun 25 '10 at 23:14
    
It's true that these objects don't have a length property, but you can do it another way: var myArr = []; myArr['key1'] = 'hello'; myArr['key2'] = 'world'; –  nyuszika7h Jan 11 '11 at 6:24
2  
@Nyuszika7H That is the wrong way. If you don't need the integer indexed Array, you should not use var myArr = [], it should be var myArr = {} in PHP they are the same thing, but not in JS. –  Juan Mendes Apr 13 '12 at 17:53

This means that you should filter the properties of evtListeners with the hasOwnProperty method.

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Just to add on to the topic of for in/for/$.each, I added a jsperf test case for using $.each vs for in: http://jsperf.com/each-vs-for-in/2

Different browsers/versions handle it differently, but it seems $.each and straight out for in are the cheapest options performance-wise.

If you're using for in to iterate through an associative array/object, knowing what you're after and ignoring everything else, use $.each if you use jQuery, or just for in (and then a break; once you've reached what you know should be the last element)

If you're iterating through an array to perform something with each key pair in it, should use the hasOwnProperty method if you DON'T use jQuery, and use $.each if you DO use jQuery.

Always use for(i=0;i<o.length;i++) if you don't need an associative array though... lol chrome performed that 97% faster than a for in or $.each

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