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For a project, I have to write a container class and the elements, where the elements need knowledge about the container they are in.Also the creation should be done by a factory methode in the container As this is easy if you use a header and a cpp file, it seem impossible for me if you (like me) only allowed to use one header. Here are a example of the problem:

class myContainer;
class myElement;

class myContainer
{
  public:
    myElement *createElement()
    {
      myElement *me =new myElement(this); 
      // do some adding to list stuff
      return me;
    }

    int askMyContainer()
    {
       return 42;
    }
};

class myElement
{
  public:
    myElement(myContainer *parent)
    {
     pcontainer=parent;
    }

    int userAskingSomething()
    {
     return pcontainer->askMyContainer();
    }
 protected:
  myContainer *pcontainer;
};

The class myContainer need knowledge about myElement, that is why myElement hat to be before myContainer, but myElement need knowledge about myContainer.

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What's going wrong? Build error? Where? –  Grimm The Opiner Oct 28 '13 at 10:15
    
Why don't you declare the function inside the class and give definition after both class declaration –  Tamim Ad Dari Oct 28 '13 at 10:19

3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

You have to split the class definition and the methods definitions into separate pieces for at least one of the classes.

For example, first define the myContainer class (i.e. the class and its variables/functions but not the implementation of those functions). Then have the myElement class. Follow this with the actual implementations of the myContainer member functions (marked inline if you want them in the header file).

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Yeah, +1 I found the same solution during writing my question. –  Martin Schlott Oct 28 '13 at 10:17
    
Äh, no, my approach is different. Marking them inline solves the problem if I wrote the implementation in the header? I got to try this... –  Martin Schlott Oct 28 '13 at 10:21

You might split the declarations and definitions using additional files to resolve the circle:

// File myContainer.h:

#include "myElement.h"

class myContainer
{
    public:
    myElement *createElement();
    int askMyContainer();
};
#include "myElement.hcc"


// File myContainer.hcc:

#include "myElement.h"

// inline myContainer functions


// File myElement.h

class myContainer;
class myElement
{
    public:
    myElement(myContainer *parent);
    int userAskingSomething();
    protected:
    myContainer *pcontainer;
};
#include "myElement.hcc"


// File myElement.hcc

#include "myContainer.h"

// inline myElement functions
share|improve this answer

During writing the question, I got one idea how to resolve it, and that is inheritance. Like

class myContainerBase
{
  pulbic:
  int askMyContainer()
  {
     return 42;
  }
};

//...
class myElement 
{
  public:
   myElement(myContainerBase *parent)
   {
     pcontainer=parent;
   }
//...

class myContainer:public my ContainerBase
{
//...

Does anyone have a better way? Or is that okay?

Joachim Pileborg got the best answer for me. In his last sentence is something I did not known before. Here my working example for there rest of us :-)

class myContainer;
class myElement;

class myContainer
{
  public:
    myElement *createElement();

    int askMyContainer()
    {
       return 42;
    }
};

class myElement
{
  public:
    myElement(myContainer *parent)
    {
     pcontainer=parent;
    }

    int userAskingSomething()
    {
     return pcontainer->askMyContainer();
    }
 protected:
  myContainer *pcontainer;
};


inline myElement *myContainer::createElement()
{
  myElement *me =new myElement(this); 
  // do some adding to list stuff
  return me;
}
share|improve this answer
    
It'd be simpler to do what the other answer suggests - e.g. don't write your myContainer::createElement() inside the class definition, but put it later, as you would if you had a .cpp file. –  benjymous Oct 28 '13 at 10:18

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