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This is how I do it with arrays where binaries are stored

>> hhh=[1 0 1 0 1 0 0; 0 0 1 0 0 0 0; 1 0 1 0 0 0 0; 0 0 0 1 1 0 1]; find(hhh(:,1)==1)

ans =

     1
     3

and now I am trying to understand how to do it with binary numbers

>> hhhh=[1010100; 0010000; 1010000; 0001101]; find(hhhh(:,1)==1)

ans =

   Empty matrix: 0-by-1

where the hack to break up all binaries back into arrays can work (ismember('101010','1') and then prepending with zeros) but I feel there is probably some better alternative so

By which command to check whether Nth bit active in binary number?

P.s. Harder puzzle: is there a type-agnostic solution that would work with both binaries and DEC?

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4  
You realize that when you type 1010100 you don't get a binary number, right? You get the decimal number "One million, ten thousand and one hundred". –  Chris Taylor Oct 28 '13 at 11:31
    
How are you storing your binary arrays? That just looks like a double array to me –  Dan Oct 28 '13 at 11:31
2  
@hhh well those aren't binary numbers then, they are decimals. I think you should stick with strings: hhhh=['1010100'; '0010000'; '1010000'; '0001101']; –  Dan Oct 28 '13 at 11:34
1  
0001101 can't be a double representation anyway. It'd be reduced to 1101. –  Eitan T Oct 28 '13 at 11:40
1  
Exactly - weird though, that bitget returns double, rather than logical... –  sebastian Oct 28 '13 at 13:22

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

String Input

If you have a string input, you can get away with testing for char equality:

find(hhh(:, 1) == '1')

for string arrays (i.e char matrices), you can extract both outputs of find (rows and columns) to be able to determine which active bit corresponds to which string:

[r, c] = find(hhh == '1');

Numeric Input

For numeric inputs, you can use bitget to get the binary representation. From there, it's very similar to the solution for string inputs:

B = bsxfun(@bitget, hhh, size(hhh, 1):-1:1);
[r, c] = find(B);

Note that find searches for non-zero elements, so there's no need to write find(B == 1) explicitly.

Combined Solution

If the solution for the "harder puzzle" is what you're after, you can determine the type of the input first, and handle it accordingly:

if ischar(hhh)
    %// Apply solution to string array
    %//...
else if isnumeric(hhh)
    %// Apply solution to numeric input
    %// ...
else
    %// This type is unsupported
    assert('Matrix is of unsupported type')
end
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1  
This works! hhhh=['1010100'; '0010000'; '1010000'; '0001101']; find(hhhh(:,3)=='1') ans = 1 2 3, thank you +1 –  hhh Oct 28 '13 at 11:41
    
@hhh Happy to help :) –  Eitan T Oct 28 '13 at 11:43
1  
@EitanT [r, c] = find(find(hhh(:, 1) == '1')), won't this always just return something like r == [1,2,3,4...] and c=[1,1,1,1...]? –  Dan Oct 28 '13 at 11:49
    
Suppose instead of binary numbers, you had something like this hhhhh=[84;16;80;13]; (same numbers as in binary) so by the above method hhhhhh=dec2bin(hhhhh);find(hhhhhh(:,3)=='1') -- would you still use the same method or some other? I thought substracting the 2^N from the number and then checking how many bits changes but this would again require conversion to binary, any smart way to check everything in DEC? Or method to work with both despite the conversion? –  hhh Oct 28 '13 at 11:56
1  
@Dan There is only one find. I've copy-pasted another "find" by mistake. Thanks for drawing my attention to it :) –  Eitan T Oct 28 '13 at 12:17

Repeating my comment in form of an answer:

There's no need to work with the string/array-like representation of the bits in this case. You can use bitget right on the output of find(mlf). Like:

filled = find(mlf);
filled_and_bit2 = filled(logical(bitget(filled,2)));
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+1 good point, drew more attention also to this in the answer. –  hhh Oct 28 '13 at 13:30

You should store your binary number as a string matrix:

hhhh=['1010100'; '0010000'; '1010000'; '0001101'];

Then you can do

find(bin2dec(hhhh) >= bin2dec('1000000'))

returns:

ans =

   1
   3

or you could use the less intuitive (but probably faster)

find(hhhh(:,1)-'0')  %// Or find(hhhh(:,1)=='1') as EitanT points out

to get the same result.

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This hhhh=['1010100'; '0010000'; '1010000'; '0001101']; find(bin2dec(hhhh) > bin2dec('0010000')) should return 1 2 3 and not just 1 2, the larger-than comparison is not checking for one active bit i.e. whether Nth bit is 1... –  hhh Oct 28 '13 at 11:40
    
@hhh then use >= but the string handling versions will be quicker as they don't need to call bin2dec –  Dan Oct 28 '13 at 11:42
    
I cannot yet unedrstand this find(hhhh(:,1)-'0'), it seems to return correct results... –  hhh Oct 28 '13 at 11:43
1  
@hhh the char's all have equivalent integer values (ascii values), so '0' - '0' is the same as 48 - 48 which is 0. '1' - '0' is not zero so find finds it. –  Dan Oct 28 '13 at 11:45

This is not a direct answer to the question but related -- good point by Sebastian in a comment! So suppose that the binaries are indices. Now instead of playing with dec2bin something like

>> hhh=dec2bin(find(mlf));B=bsxfun(@bitget, hhh, 8:-1:1);find(B)
Error using bsxfun
Non-singleton dimensions of the two input arrays must match each other.

we can directly address the indices like

>> filled = find(mlf); 
filled_and_bit2 = bitget(filled,1); 
filled(logical(filled_and_bit2))

ans =

     1
     7

where it finds the binaries with the first active bit.

Procedure

Data

>> mlf=sparse([],[],[],2^31,1);
mlf(1)=7;
mlf(4)=10;
mlf(7)=-1;
>> mlf

mlf =

                      (1,1)                       7
                      (4,1)                      10
                      (7,1)                      -1

>> find(mlf)

ans =

     1
     4
     7

Interpret the index numbers as binary

(1,1) -----> 000001

(4,1) -----> 000100

(7,1) -----> 000111

Examples

Output 1: find cases where 3th bit is active

4

7

Output: find cases where 1st bit is active

1

7

Output: find cases where 2nd bit is active

4
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