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Hey I'm fairly new to python, I'm currently studying Jython at University. So please forgive my ignorance.

Basically what I'm trying to do is create a "comic book" style picture using user selected images(easy enough) but because the number of pictures created is a variable, I've used a dict and assigned keys to each loop in the for function. But then I want to recall them again in another for loop. (also I'm aware theres possibly a few errors in my code, I'm just putting it up to give you an idea.

    def comicStrip():
      picture={}
      totalWidth=0
      totalHeight=0
      pixelCount=0
      loopCounter=0
      pictureCount=requestInteger("How many pictures do you want in the comic strip?(1-4)")
      while pictureCount <1 or pictureCount >4:     
        pictureCount=requestInteger("How many pictures do you want in the comic strip?(1-4)")
      for p in range(1,pictureCount+1):
        picture[p]=makePicture(pickAFile())
        width[p]=getWidth(picture[p])
        height[p]=getHeight[p]
        totalWidth=totalWidth+width[p]
        height=getHeight(picture[p])
        if height > totalHeight:
          totalHeight=height
        cStrip=makeEmptyPicture(totalWidth, totalHeight)
        while loopCounter < pictureCount:
          for targetX in range(0,p1Width):
           sourceY=0
           for targetY in range(0,p1Height):
             color = getColor(getPixel(picture1,sourceX,sourceY))
             setColor(getPixel(cStrip,targetX,targetY),color)
             sourceY=sourceY+1
           sourceX=sourceX+1
        addRectFilled(cStrip,0,0,p1Width,20,white)
        addRect(cStrip,0,0,p1Width,20)
        addRect(cStrip,0,0,p1Width,p1Height)
        caption=requestString("Enter the caption for this picture.") 
        addText(cStrip,1,19,str(caption))
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1  
You may find posting to codereview.stackexchange.com useful for feedback once you get things working. –  Mr E Oct 28 '13 at 16:11
    
Thanks heaps,I will definitely have a look into that. –  Chris Wakeling Oct 28 '13 at 22:05

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

To print a list of dict keys, there is a simple command:

d = {}
d.update({'a':1})
d.update({'b':2})
print d.keys()

gives an output of

['a', 'b']

Then, to print the value for a specific key, use this line:

print d.get('a','')

where 'a' is the key. If the key doesn't exist, no error is given with the '.get' syntax.

You can then loop over all keys:

for element in d.keys():
    print d.get(element,'')

Or

for element in d.keys():
    print d[element]
share|improve this answer
    
d.update({"k":"v"}) is an overcomplexified way to write d["k"] = "v". I don't know where this antipattern use of dict.update comes from but it really starts to get on my nerves... –  bruno desthuilliers Oct 29 '13 at 11:06
    
@brunodesthuilliers, do you feel the same about .append() and .extend() for lists? I prefer .update() for dictionaries but that's just my opinion, man. i.imgur.com/jqCTQTj.gif –  philshem Oct 29 '13 at 15:18

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