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I wrote a simple program as below and straced it.

#include<stdio.h>
int foo(int i)
{
    int k=9;
    if(i==10)
            return 1;
    else
            foo(++i);
    open("1",1);
}
int main()
{
    foo(1);
}

My intention in doing so was to checkout how is memory allocated for the variables (int k in this case) in a function on a stack. I used an open system call as a marker. The output of strace was as below:

execve("./a.out", ["./a.out"], [/* 25 vars */]) = 0
brk(0)                                  = 0x8653000
access("/etc/ld.so.nohwcap", F_OK)      = -1 ENOENT (No such file or            directory)
mmap2(NULL, 8192, PROT_READ|PROT_WRITE, MAP_PRIVATE|MAP_ANONYMOUS, -1, 0) =     0xb777e000
access("/etc/ld.so.preload", R_OK)      = -1 ENOENT (No such file or directory)
open("/etc/ld.so.cache", O_RDONLY|O_CLOEXEC) = 3
fstat64(3, {st_mode=S_IFREG|0644, st_size=95172, ...}) = 0
mmap2(NULL, 95172, PROT_READ, MAP_PRIVATE, 3, 0) = 0xb7766000
close(3)                                = 0
access("/etc/ld.so.nohwcap", F_OK)      = -1 ENOENT (No such file or     directory)
open("/lib/i386-linux-gnu/libc.so.6", O_RDONLY|O_CLOEXEC) = 3
read(3, "\177ELF\1\1\1\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\0\3\0\3\0\1\0\0\0000\226\1\0004\0\0\0"..., 512) = 512
fstat64(3, {st_mode=S_IFREG|0755, st_size=1734120, ...}) = 0
mmap2(NULL, 1743580, PROT_READ|PROT_EXEC, MAP_PRIVATE|MAP_DENYWRITE, 3, 0) =     0xb75bc000
mmap2(0xb7760000, 12288, PROT_READ|PROT_WRITE,     MAP_PRIVATE|MAP_FIXED|MAP_DENYWRITE, 3, 0x1a4) = 0xb7760000
mmap2(0xb7763000, 10972, PROT_READ|PROT_WRITE, MAP_PRIVATE|MAP_FIXED|MAP_ANONYMOUS, -1, 0) = 0xb7763000
close(3)                                = 0
mmap2(NULL, 4096, PROT_READ|PROT_WRITE, MAP_PRIVATE|MAP_ANONYMOUS, -1, 0) =     0xb75bb000
set_thread_area({entry_number:-1 -> 6, base_addr:0xb75bb900, limit:1048575, seg_32bit:1, contents:0, read_exec_only:0, limit_in_pages:1, seg_not_present:0, useable:1}) = 0
mprotect(0xb7760000, 8192, PROT_READ)   = 0
mprotect(0x8049000, 4096, PROT_READ)    = 0
mprotect(0xb77a1000, 4096, PROT_READ)   = 0
munmap(0xb7766000, 95172)               = 0
open("1", O_WRONLY)                     = -1 ENOENT (No such file or     directory)
open("1", O_WRONLY)                     = -1 ENOENT (No such file or     directory)
open("1", O_WRONLY)                     = -1 ENOENT (No such file or directory)
open("1", O_WRONLY)                     = -1 ENOENT (No such file or     directory)
open("1", O_WRONLY)                     = -1 ENOENT (No such file or     directory)
open("1", O_WRONLY)                     = -1 ENOENT (No such file or     directory)
open("1", O_WRONLY)                     = -1 ENOENT (No such file or     directory)
open("1", O_WRONLY)                     = -1 ENOENT (No such file or directory)
open("1", O_WRONLY)                     = -1 ENOENT (No such file or directory)
exit_group(-1)                          = ?

Towards the end of the strace output you can see that no system call is being called in between the open system calls. So how is the memory allocated on to the stack , for the function being called , without a system call?

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migrated from unix.stackexchange.com Oct 28 '13 at 17:19

This question came from our site for users of Linux, FreeBSD and other Un*x-like operating systems..

    
Missing a "}" for foo definition? Also, the compilation optimizer will remove the reference to k since it is not used anywhere. –  rickhg12hs Oct 28 '13 at 16:46
    
Stack operations (new stack frame, return from function, adjust space for new variables, delete variables, etc.) are typically not done via system call, but simply handled by the generated code. As such, strace isn't going to be very useful... –  twalberg Oct 28 '13 at 18:10
    
Not answering your question here, but it's worth noting your program does not behave the way you think it does: even if memory were allocated to the stack for each recursive call, the memory would all have been allocated by the time you get to the first open() call, because your recursion occurs before the call, not after it. –  Jules Oct 28 '13 at 18:36
    
a serious note on strace: strace can't show libraries that open with dl_open() –  Mohsen Pahlevanzadeh Oct 28 '13 at 21:57

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Stack usage and allocation (at least on Linux) works this way:

  • A little bit of stack is allocated.
  • A guard range is setup after the "other" part of the program, at about 1/4 of the address space.
  • If the stack is used up to its top and above, the stack gets automatically increased.
  • This happens either if the ulimit limit is reached (and SIGSEGVs) or, if none such exists, until it hits the guard range (and then gets a SIGBUS).
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How is automatic increase in stack done? –  PaulDaviesC Oct 29 '13 at 12:00
2  
@PaulDaviesC: it's done on page fault. e.g. on x86 all other possibilities are checked first, and if it's none of them the page fault is due to an access outside the currently mapped stack (the previous check is address + 65536 + 32 * sizeof(unsigned long) < regs->sp). See arch/x86/mm/fault.c:do_page_fault(). –  ninjalj Oct 29 '13 at 12:36

Stack memory for the main thread is allocated by the kernel during the execve() system call. During this call, other mappings defined in the executable file (and possibly also for the dynamic linker specified in the executable) are also setup. For ELF files, this is done in fs/binfmt_elf.c.

Stack memory for other threads is mmap()ed by the thread support library, which is usually part of the C runtime library.

You should also note that on virtual memory systems, the main thread stack is grown by the kernel in response to page faults, up to a configurable limit (shown by ulimit -s).

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Your (single threaded) program stack size is fixed so there is no further allocation to expect.

You can query and increase this size with the ulimit -s command.

Note that even if you set this limit to "unlimited", there always will be a practical limit:

  • With 32 bit processes, unless you are low on RAM/swap, the virtual memory space limitation will cause address collisions

  • With 64 bit processes, memory (RAM + swap) exhaustion will thrash your system and eventually crash your program.

Whatever the case, there are never explicit system calls to expect that would increase the stack size, it is only set when the program starts.

Note also that the stack memory is handled exactly like heap memory, i.e. only the part of it that has been accessed is mapped to real memory (either RAM or swap). This means the stack kind of grows on demand but no other mechanism than standard virtual memory management is handling that.

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I don't see how it is fixed in any way. Where do you see that? –  glglgl Oct 29 '13 at 5:11
    
That's by design. The stack size of the main (or single here) thread has a fixed size when a program starts. You can see what it is by using the "ulimit -s" command. This is virtual memory so like memory acquired with malloc, it is just reserved and only backed by real memory (RAM or swap) if accessed. There is no mechanism to allow a process to increase its stack size at run time. –  jlliagre Oct 29 '13 at 8:11
    
You can set ulimit -s unlimited. After that, you have no real limit. You can test this code and see how it advances and advances and the stack grows and grows towards smaller addresses. You'll see how, after running it for a long time, it will eventually collide with other parts of the program. But as the stack starts at bf82f000 (exact values are subject to change) and the said other parts are at 401bb000 and below, we have very much space to use on the stack (I have reached step 1027625 before it collided). ulimit -s is just an additional "gimmick"... –  glglgl Oct 29 '13 at 8:30
    
BTW, it is interesting to see that if the program hits a (set) ulimit, I get a SIGSEGV, while if I hit the "program area", I get a SIGBUS... –  glglgl Oct 29 '13 at 8:30
    
@glglgl Even when specifying "no limit", there is always a practical limit as you experienced. If your program is compiled in 64 bit, there will be no address collision but memory exhaustion. Whatever the case, there is never an explicit system call performing an allocation which is what the OP was looking for. –  jlliagre Oct 29 '13 at 10:18

Your program doesn't begin to make any open calls until the recursion "bottoms out". At that point, the stack is allocated, and it's just popping out of the nesting.

Why don't you step through it with a debugger.

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Do you want to find out where variables are allocated to 'stack frames' created for functions? I have revised your program to show you the memory address of your stack variable k, and a parameter variable kk,

//Show stack location for a variable, k
#include <stdio.h>
int foo(int i)
{
    int k=9;
    if(i>=10) //relax the condition, safer
        return 1;
    else
        foo(++i);
    open("1",1);
    //return i;
}
int bar(int kk, int i)
{
    int k=9;
    printf("&k: %x, &kk: %x\n",&k,&kk); //address variable on stack, parameter
    if(i<10) //relax the condition, safer
        bar(k,++i);
    else
        return 1;
    return k;
}
int main()
{
    //foo(1);
    bar(0,1);
}

And the output, on my system,

$ ./foo
&k: bfa8064c, &kk: bfa80660
&k: bfa8061c, &kk: bfa80630
&k: bfa805ec, &kk: bfa80600
&k: bfa805bc, &kk: bfa805d0
&k: bfa8058c, &kk: bfa805a0
&k: bfa8055c, &kk: bfa80570
&k: bfa8052c, &kk: bfa80540
&k: bfa804fc, &kk: bfa80510
&k: bfa804cc, &kk: bfa804e0
&k: bfa8049c, &kk: bfa804b0
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