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I have been attempting to split a div into two columns using CSS, but I have not managed to get it working yet. My basic structure is as follows:

<div id="content">
  <div id="left">
     <div id="object1"></div>
     <div id="object2"></div>
  </div>

  <div id="right">
     <div id="object3"></div>
     <div id="object4"></div>
  </div>
</div>

If I attempt to float the right and left divs to their respective positions (right and left), it seems to ignore the content div's background-color. And other code that I have tried from various websites doesn't seem to be able to translate to my structure.

Thanks for any help!

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1  
There are so many solutions,you can see this:stackoverflow.com/questions/211383/… –  enmaai Apr 29 '14 at 2:38

9 Answers 9

up vote 37 down vote accepted

When you float those two divs, the content div collapses to zero height. Just add

<br style="clear:both;"/>

after the #right div but inside the content div. That will force the content div to surround the two internal, floating divs.

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Thanks Rob, it works great! –  PF1 Dec 26 '09 at 20:47
    
+1 Nicest solution found and working as expected! Thanks! –  Will Marcouiller Apr 3 '13 at 0:52
4  
It's unfortunate that this has been upvoted so many times. You should really avoid extraneous markup, especially considering that there are other viable, widely-used remedies. –  Jbird Aug 30 '13 at 0:25

Another way to do this is to add overflow:hidden; to the parent element of the floated elements.

overflow:hidden will make the element grow to fit in floated elements.

This way, it can all be done in css rather than adding another html element.

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I'd encourage readers to check out my other answer as well. I think it's actually better than this one. –  tybro0103 May 16 '12 at 13:59
1  
one more note: overflow:auto; can sometimes be a better option –  tybro0103 Apr 14 '13 at 4:17
    
This is definitely an effective means. However, it's worth mentioning that this can create some obvious layout challenges. For example, if I want my parent element's overflow to be visible. –  Jbird Aug 30 '13 at 0:21

This works good for me. I have divided the screen into two halfs: 20% and 80%:

<div style="width: 20%; float:left">
   #left content in here
</div>

<div style="width: 80%; float:right">
   #right content in there
</div>
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If this is all you do, the parent of these elements will have no height. –  tybro0103 Aug 19 '14 at 17:41
    
Easy and effective. Thank you! –  Alexis Gamarra Feb 11 at 16:47

The most flexible way to do this:

#content::after {
  display:block;
  content:"";
  clear:both;
}

This acts exactly the same as appending the element to #content:

<br style="clear:both;"/>

but without actually adding an element. ::after is called a pseudo element. The only reason this is better than adding overflow:hidden; to #content is that you can have absolute positioned child elements overflow and still be visible. Also it will allow box-shadow's to still be visible.

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Also a great solution, but it's worth mentioning here that this does not work in IE8. It really pains me to be the one to say that and I apologize for being "that guy". –  Jbird Aug 30 '13 at 0:22
    
@Jbird try #content:after (just one colon instead of two)... If I recall correctly, it's more proper to use two colons for pseudo elements, but older IEs only recognize it if it has one. ...or something like that - it's quite some time since I've dealt with that issue. –  tybro0103 Aug 30 '13 at 4:11

For whatever reason I've never liked the clearing approaches, I rely on floats and percentage widths for things like this.

Here's something that works in simple cases:

#content { 
  overflow:auto; 
  width: 600px; 
  background: gray; 
} 

#left, #right { 
  width: 40%; 
  margin:5px; 
  padding: 1em; 
  background: white; 
} 

#left  { float:left;  }
#right { float:right; } 

If you put some content in you'll see that it works:

<div id="content">
  <div id="left">
     <div id="object1">some stuff</div>
     <div id="object2">some more stuff</div>
  </div>

  <div id="right">
     <div id="object3">unas cosas</div>
     <div id="object4">mas cosas para ti</div>
  </div>
</div>

You can see it here: http://cssdesk.com/d64uy

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Best way to divide a div vertically --

        #parent {
                    margin: 0;
                    width: 100%;
                }
                .left {
                    float: left;
                    width: 60%;
                }
                .right {
                    overflow: hidden;
                    width: 40%;
                }
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This is best answered here Question 211383

These days, any self-respecting person should be using the stated "micro-clearfix" approach of clearing floats.

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Floats don't affect the flow. What I tend to do is add a

<p class="extro" style="clear: both">possibly some content</p>

at the end of the 'wrapping div' (in this case content). I can justify this on a semantic basis by saying that such a paragraph might be needed. Another approach is to use a clearfix CSS:

#content:after {
  content: ".";
  display: block;
  height: 0;
  clear: both;
  visibility: hidden;
}

#content {
  display: inline-block;
}
/*  \*/
* html #content {
  height: 1%;
}

#content {
  display: block;
}
/*  */

The trickery with the comments is for cross-browser compatibility.

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  1. Make font size equal to zero in parent DIV.
  2. Set width % for each of child DIVs.

    #content {
        font-size: 0;
    }
    
    #content > div {
        font-size: 16px;
        width: 50%;
    }
    

*In Safari you may need to set 49% to make it works.

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While this code snippet may solve the question, including an explanation really helps to improve the quality of your post. Remember that you are answering the question for readers in the future, and those people might not know the reasons for your code suggestion. –  msrd0 Apr 28 at 18:36

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