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I am using a recursive call in a tree in matlab, the basic structure of the function is here:

function recursion(tree, targetedFeatures)

    if (some conditions fulfilled)
      return;
    end

    for i = 1:1:size(targetedFeatures,2)
      .....
      .....
       if (some conditions that using index i is true)
          targetedFeatures(1,i) = 1; 
       end
    end

    if(tree has child nodes)
       recursion(tree.child(j).targetedFeatures)
    end
end

The structure of the tree is like this:

            root
           /  |  \
          /   |   \
         /    |    \
      leaf1  leaf2  leaf3

The input parameter of function recursion is a vector named targetedFeatures, assume its initial values is [0 0 0], and in the process of visiting leaf1, the vector is changed to [1 0 0], BUT when visiting to leaf2, the targetedFeature changed back to [0 0 0].

I suspect it is because vector in matlab does not like an reference to object in other programming language?

How can I avoid this issue? Thanks.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Matlab uses call-by-value for normal types of variables, see here. A way to work around it is to let the function return the modified copy as an output argument:

function targetedFeatures = recursion(tree, targetedFeatures)
  ...
  targetedFeatures = recursion(tree.child(j).targetedFeatures);
  ...
end

Instead, call-by-reference might be simulated by using evalin('caller', ...) and inputname.

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Your point is completely valid -- it is necessary to return the modified copy. However, it is not necessarily true that MATLAB uses pass by value anymore. Loren of MathWorks explains some of these memory optimizations. See also the links in my comment to nispio. –  chappjc Oct 28 '13 at 19:29
1  
Well, from a programming standpoint it is still pass-by-value (as opposed to pass-by-reference), isn't it? It's just implemented in a clever way, not as simple copying at call time. –  A. Donda Oct 28 '13 at 19:32
    
Yes, it should certainly be treated that way for the purposes of changing a variable. But these optimizations under the hood allow you to treat it as pass-by-reference if you do not modify the variable. The only reason I point this out is because people often get very concerned about unnecessary copies, when they are often not taking place at all. This is tangential to the question, I admit. –  chappjc Oct 28 '13 at 19:35
1  
True. Matlab is smarter than people. ;-) Most of the time there is no reason to get concerned as long as one doesn't run out of time and/or memory. And then, one should use the profiler instead of guessing. Still, knowing a bit about the internals can be very helpful. –  A. Donda Oct 28 '13 at 19:38
1  
I tried it, it works :) In your code, can I just change the name of output argument as targetedFeatures? so I can remove the last line (tf=targetedFeature). –  Truman's world Oct 28 '13 at 19:52

When the recursion function needs to modify targetedFeatures, a copy of targetedFeatures is created which is local to that function call. If you want your updates to be communicated back to the calling scope, then you will need to return the updated targetedFeatures from your function.

function targetedFeatures = recursion(tree, targetedFeatures)

    if (some conditions fulfilled)
      return;
    end

    for i = 1:1:size(targetedFeatures,2)
      .....
      .....
       if (some conditions that using index i is true)
          targetedFeatures(1,i) = 1; 
       end
    end

    if(tree has child nodes)
       targetedFeatures = recursion(tree.child(j).targetedFeatures)
    end
end

This is not nearly as effective as doing things with pointers like you might do in C for example, but you should not see a significant performance hit on what your code is already doing, since you are already creating local copies whenever you update targetedFeatures.

Thanks to chappjc for providing a link to this post which discusses the copy-on-write mechanism.

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This is not precisely correct. See section 2. in this post. MATLAB will not make a copy unless it needs one. Yes, in this case it will make a copy, but it will not happen until targetedFeatures is actually modified. See also this post provided by A. Donda's answer. –  chappjc Oct 28 '13 at 19:24
    
@chappjc Wow that is really good to know. I was just basing my comments off of observed behavior. I will update my answer accordingly. –  nispio Oct 28 '13 at 19:26

Depending on the length and eventually depth of your tree the return-based solutions above quickly become pretty ugly, since you'll always have to change the root node while in principle you'd only like to change one of many leafs.

Instead, you might want to look into implementing a handle class for the TreeNode object. This would start off with something as simple as:

classdef TreeNode < handle

    properties
        targetedFeatures;
        child; % vector keeping handles to TreeNode children
        parent; % handle of the parent node, of which this node is a child
    end

    methods
        ...
    end
end

You'd obviously have to fill in methods to add/remove children etc. With such a tree you can recurse down to the deepest leaf and change its value without the need to carry around a reference to the top level root node all the time. Once you have this in place, you should be able to use your function without modification.

An implementation of a somewhat similar class is one for linked lists, demonstrated in the MATLAB docs: http://www.mathworks.de/de/help/matlab/matlab_oop/example--implementing-linked-lists.html Here every node has a previous and next "child", instead of a parent and multiple children, but the general structure is pretty similar.

If you're planning to have a lot of other operations on this tree, like adding/removing nodes, searching, etc. it will definitely be worth it at some point. If you just happened to come across that tree and you're done once you fixed this single issue, than go for the return-based solutions.

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