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I'm implementing remove method for binary search tree in C++. In one of cases I am sure that tree node has only one child: node->left or node->right and I need to modify it's parent to point to that child. As I mentioned before one of node->left and node->right are NULL. Here's a snippet:

} else { // One children
  if (node->parent->left == node) {
    node->parent->left = node->left | node->right;
    node->parent->left->parent = node->parent;
  } else {
    node->parent->right = node->left | node->right;
    node->parent->right->parent = node->parent;
  }
}

Unfortunatelly, compiler returns an error. I know that it's maybe not the elegant one but I was just curious how to do it.

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closed as off-topic by Walter, H2CO3, πάντα ῥεῖ, WhozCraig, Christian Ternus Oct 28 '13 at 21:28

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "Questions asking for code must demonstrate a minimal understanding of the problem being solved. Include attempted solutions, why they didn't work, and the expected results. See also: Stack Overflow question checklist" – Walter, Community, πάντα ῥεῖ, WhozCraig, Christian Ternus
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

3  
Why would you ever want to do this? –  Captain Obvlious Oct 28 '13 at 20:20
1  
what did you think is the effect of pointer | pointer? –  Walter Oct 28 '13 at 20:21
5  
@keepkimi First of all, pointers are not numbers. They are pointers. Second, NULL is not necessarily the number 0. –  user529758 Oct 28 '13 at 20:23
1  
1  
To be more specific: it's well known that pointers contain addresses, and addresses consist of a bit pattern. Asking why bit manipulation of an address doesn't work is perfectly valid. Someone coming from an assembler background would especially be confused, although I suspect that's rare these days. –  Mark Ransom Oct 28 '13 at 22:34

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Bit manipulation on pointers isn't supported by C++ or C. You can convert them to integers, do the or, then convert back, but that's just asking for trouble for no particular gain.

Use ternary expressions instead:

node->parent->left = node->left ? node->left : node->right;
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I'm not sure that would achieve what you want. Assigning your pointers the result of a bitwise OR of two other pointers would result in a pointer that points to who knows where.

I think what you are looking for is something like this:

} else { // One children
  if (node->parent->left == node) {
    node->parent->left = node->left != null ? node->left : node->right;
    node->parent->left->parent = node->parent;
  } else {
    node->parent->right = node->left | node->right;
    node->parent->right->parent = node->parent;
  }
}
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