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I need the timestamps of files on my local and on my server to be in sync. This is accomplished with Subversion by setting use-commit-times=true in the config so that the last modified of each file is when it was committed.

Each time I clone my repository, I want the timestamps of files to reflect when they were last changed in the remote repository, not when I cloned the repo.

Is there any way to do this with git?

share|improve this question
    
As part of my deploy process, I upload assets (images, javascript files, and css files) to a CDN. Each filename is appended with the last modified timestamp. It's important I don't expire all my assets each time I deploy. (Another side-effect of use-commit-times is that I can do this process on my local and know my server will refer to the same files, but that's not as important.) If instead of doing a git clone, I did a git fetch followed by a git reset --hard from my remote repo, that would work for a single server, but not for multiple servers since the timestamps on each would be diff. –  Ben W Dec 26 '09 at 22:46
    
@BenW: git annex might be useful to keep track of images –  J.F. Sebastian Aug 12 '12 at 12:44
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7 Answers

up vote 10 down vote accepted

I am not sure this would be appropriate for a DVCS (as in "Distributed" VCS)

The huge discussion had already took place in 2007 (see this thread)

And some of Linus's answer were not too keen on the idea. Here is one sample:

I'm sorry. If you don't see how it's WRONG to seta datestamp back to something that will make a simple "make" miscompile your source tree, I don't know what defintiion of "wrong" you are talking about.
It's WRONG.
It's STUPID.
And it's totally INFEASIBLE to implement.


The long answer was:

I think you're much better off just using multiple repositories instead, if this is something common.

Messing with timestamps is not going to work in general. It's just going to guarantee you that "make" gets confused in a really bad way, and does not recompile enough instead of recompiling too much.

Git does make it possible to do your "check the other branch out" thing very easily, in many different ways.

You could create some trivial script that does any of the following (ranging from the trivial to the more exotic):

  • just create a new repo:

    git clone old new
    cd new
    git checkout origin/<branch>
    

    and there you are. The old timestamps are fine in your old repo, and you can work (and compile) in the new one, without affectign the old one at all.

    Use the flags "-n -l -s" to "git clone" to basically make this instantaneous. For lots of files (eg big repos like the kernel), it's not going to be as fast as just switching branches, but havign a second copy of the working tree can be quite powerful.

  • do the same thing with just a tar-ball instead, if you want to

    git archive --format=tar --prefix=new-tree/ <branchname> |
            (cd .. ; tar xvf -)
    

    which is really quite fast, if you just want a snapshot.

  • get used to "git show", and just look at individual files.
    This is actually really useful at times. You just do

    git show otherbranch:filename
    

    in one xterm window, and look at the same file in your current branch in another window. In particular, this should be trivial to do with scriptable editors (ie GNU emacs), where it should be possible to basically have a whole "dired mode" for other branches within the editor, using this. For all I know, the emacs git mode already offers something like this (I'm not an emacs user)

  • and in the extreme example of that "virtual directory" thing, there was at least somebody working on a git plugin for FUSE, ie you could literally just have virtual directories showing all your branches.

and I'm sure any of the above are better alternatives than playing games with file timestamps.

Linus

share|improve this answer
3  
Agreed. You shouldn't be confusing a DVCS with a distribution system. git is a DVCS, for manipulating source code that will be built into your final product. If you want a distribution system, you know where to find rsync. –  Randal Schwartz Dec 26 '09 at 22:15
5  
Hm, I'll have to trust his argument that it's infeasible. Whether it's wrong or stupid though is another matter. I version my files using a timestamp and upload them to a CDN, which is why it's important that the timestamps reflect when the file was actually modified, not when it was last pulled down from the repo. –  Ben W Dec 26 '09 at 22:18
2  
Does anyone know how else I might preserve last modified times of my files if they're in git repo? –  Ben W Dec 26 '09 at 22:23
2  
@Ben W: the "Linus's answer" is not here to say it is wrong in your particular situation. It is there only as a reminder that a DVCS is not well-suited for that kind of feature (timestamp preserving). –  VonC Dec 26 '09 at 22:26
2  
@VonC: Since other modern DVCS like Bazaar and Mercurial handle timestamps just fine, I'd rather say that "git is not well-suited for that kind of feature". If "a" DVCS should have that feature is debatable (and I strongly think they do). –  MestreLion Jul 26 '13 at 0:21
show 2 more comments

If, however you really want to use commit times for timestamps when checking out then try using this script and place it (as executable) in the file $GIT_DIR/.git/hooks/post-checkout:

#!/bin/sh -e

OS=${OS:-`uname`}
old_rev="$1"
new_rev="$2"

get_file_rev() {
    git rev-list -n 1 "$new_rev" "$1"
}

if   [ "$OS" = 'Linux' ]
then
    update_file_timestamp() {
        file_time=`git show --pretty=format:%ai --abbrev-commit "$(get_file_rev "$1")" | head -n 1`
        touch -d "$file_time" "$1"
    }
elif [ "$OS" = 'FreeBSD' ]
then
    update_file_timestamp() {
        file_time=`date -r "$(git show --pretty=format:%at --abbrev-commit "$(get_file_rev "$1")" | head -n 1)" '+%Y%m%d%H%M.%S'`
        touch -h -t "$file_time" "$1"
    }
else
    echo "timestamp changing not implemented" >&2
    exit 1
fi

IFS=`printf '\t\n\t'`

for file in `git ls-files`
do
    update_file_timestamp "$file"
done

Note however, that this script will cause quite a large delay for checking out large repositories (where large means large amount of files, not large file sizes).

share|improve this answer
21  
+1 for an actual answer, rather than just saying "Don't do that" –  DanC Nov 10 '10 at 11:23
1  
Many thanks Giel, this is working brilliantly (I actually ported this into my site deployment script, see additional answer below) –  Alex Dean Apr 3 '11 at 19:07
2  
| head -n 1 should be avoided as it spawns a new process, -n 1 for git rev-list and git log can be used instead. –  eregon Mar 25 '12 at 12:46
    
It's better NOT to read lines with `...` and for; see Why you don't read lines with "for". I'd go for git ls-files -z and while IFS= read -r -d ''. –  musiphil Mar 8 '13 at 10:28
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IMHO, not storing timestamps (and other metadata like permissions and ownership) is a big limitation of git.

Linus' rationale of timestamps being harmful just because it "confuses make" is lame:

  • make clean is enough to fix any problems.

  • Applies only to projects that use make, mostly C/C++. It is completely moot for scripts like Python, Perl, or documentation in general.

  • There is only harm if you apply the timestamps. There would be no harm in storing them in repo. Applying them could be a simple --with-timestamps option for git checkout and friends (clone, pull etc), at the user's discretion.

Both Bazaar and Mercurial stores metadata. Users can apply them or not when checking out. But in git, since original timestamps are not even available in the repo, there is no such option.

So, for a very small gain (not having to re-compile everything) that is specific to a subset of projects, git as a general DVCS was crippled, some information from about files is lost, and, as Linus said, it's INFEASIBLE to do it now. Sad.

That said, may I offer 2 approaches?

1 - http://repo.or.cz/w/metastore.git , by David Härdeman. Tries to do what git should have done in the first place: stores metadata (not only timestamps) in the repo when commiting (via pre-commit hook), and re-applies them when pulling (also via hooks).

2 - My humble version of a script I used before for generating release tarballs. As mentioned in other answers, the approach is a little different: to apply for each file the timestamp of the most recent commit where the file was modified.

Below is a really bare-bones version of the script. For actual usage I strongly suggest one of the more robust versions above:

#!/usr/bin/env python
# Bare-bones version. Current dir must be top-level of work tree.
# Usage: git-restore-mtime-bare [pathspecs...]
# By default update all files
# Example: to only update only the README and files in ./doc:
# git-restore-mtime-bare README doc

import subprocess, shlex
import sys, os.path

filelist = set()
for path in (sys.argv[1:] or [os.path.curdir]):
    if os.path.isfile(path) or os.path.islink(path):
        filelist.add(os.path.relpath(path))
    elif os.path.isdir(path):
        for root, subdirs, files in os.walk(path):
            if '.git' in subdirs:
                subdirs.remove('.git')
            for file in files:
                filelist.add(os.path.relpath(os.path.join(root, file)))

mtime = 0
gitobj = subprocess.Popen(shlex.split('git whatchanged --pretty=%at'),
                          stdout=subprocess.PIPE)
for line in gitobj.stdout:
    line = line.strip()
    if not line: continue

    if line.startswith(':'):
        file = line.split('\t')[-1]
        if file in filelist:
            filelist.remove(file)
            #print mtime, file
            os.utime(file, (mtime, mtime))
    else:
        mtime = long(line)

    # All files done?
    if not filelist:
        break

Performance is pretty impressive, even for monster projects wine, git or even the linux kernel:

bash
# 0.27 seconds
# 5,750 log lines processed
# 62 commits evaluated
# 1,155 updated files

git
# 3.71 seconds
# 96,702 log lines processed
# 24,217 commits evaluated
# 2,495 updated files

wine
# 13.53 seconds
# 443,979 log lines processed
# 91,703 commits evaluated
# 6,005 updated files

linux kernel
# 59.11 seconds
# 1,484,567 log lines processed
# 313,164 commits evaluated
# 40,902 updated files
share|improve this answer
    
But git does store timestamps, etc. It just doesn't set the timestamps by default. Just look at the output of git ls-files --debug –  Ross Smith II Jan 30 '13 at 3:36
5  
@RossSmithII: git ls-files operates on working directory and index, so it doesn't mean it actually stores that info on the repo. If it did store, retrieving (and applying) mtime would be trivial. –  MestreLion Jan 31 '13 at 7:33
    
I see you deleted yours already, so it wasn't really a question, huh? As much as I hate deleting anything, I kinda agree. I'll just leave the first comment, "edited" next, and suggest a single edition on your post, to help future me of not rushing into wrong conclusions again. –  Cawas Aug 15 '13 at 13:28
1  
Also, we got a few sh similar half-solutions (I think it makes much more sense than python): too bad one works just on applying commit time, and git-cache-meta doesn't work on windows! I'd wish git just had a clean and sweet "keep files meta data" option... –  Cawas Aug 15 '13 at 13:38
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I took Giel's answer and instead of using a post-commit hook script, worked it into my custom deployment script.

Update: I've also removed one | head -n following @eregon's suggestion, and added support for files with spaces in them:

# Adapted to use HEAD rather than the new commit ref
get_file_rev() {
    git rev-list -n 1 HEAD "$1"
}

# Same as Giel's answer above
update_file_timestamp() {
    file_time=`git show --pretty=format:%ai --abbrev-commit "$(get_file_rev "$1")" | head -n 1`
    sudo touch -d "$file_time" "$1"
}

# Loop through and fix timestamps on all files in our CDN directory
old_ifs=$IFS
IFS=$'\n' # Support files with spaces in them
for file in $(git ls-files | grep "$cdn_dir")
do
    update_file_timestamp "${file}"
done
IFS=$old_ifs
share|improve this answer
2  
for reference, %ai is the "author date, ISO 8601 format" –  Daniel S. Sterling Jan 4 '12 at 0:49
    
Thanks Daniel, that's helpful to know –  Alex Dean Jan 4 '12 at 1:10
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The following script incorporates the -n 1 and HEAD suggestions, works in most non-Linux environments (like Cygwin), and can be run on a checkout after the fact:

#!/bin/bash -e

OS=${OS:-`uname`}

get_file_rev() {
    git rev-list -n 1 HEAD "$1"
}    

if [ "$OS" = 'FreeBSD' ]
then
    update_file_timestamp() {
        file_time=`date -r "$(git show --pretty=format:%at --abbrev-commit "$(get_file_rev "$1")" | head -n 1)" '+%Y%m%d%H%M.%S'`
        touch -h -t "$file_time" "$1"
    }    
else    
    update_file_timestamp() {
        file_time=`git show --pretty=format:%ai --abbrev-commit "$(get_file_rev "$1")" | head -n 1`
        touch -d "$file_time" "$1"
    }    
fi    

OLD_IFS=$IFS
IFS=$'\n'

for file in `git ls-files`
do
    update_file_timestamp "$file"
done

IFS=$OLD_IFS

git update-index --refresh

Assuming you named the above script /path/to/templates/hooks/post-checkout and/or /path/to/templates/hooks/post-update, you can run it on an existing repository via:

git clone git://path/to/repository.git
cd repository
/path/to/templates/hooks/post-checkout
share|improve this answer
    
It needs one more last line: git update-index --refresh // GUI tools might rely upon index and show "dirty"status to all the file after such operation. Namely that happens in TortoiseGit for Windows code.google.com/p/tortoisegit/issues/detail?id=861 –  Arioch 'The Aug 6 '12 at 12:48
    
I added the command. Thanks for the help! –  Ross Smith II Aug 7 '12 at 4:55
1  
And thanks for script. I wish such script was part of Git standard installer. Not that i need it personally, but team members just feel timestamp refreashing as a red "stop" banner in VCS adoption. –  Arioch 'The Aug 7 '12 at 8:17
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we were forced to invent yet another solution, because we needed specifically modification times and not commit times, and the solution also had to be portable (i.e. getting python working in windows's git installations really is not a simple task) and fast. It resembles the David Hardeman's solution, which I decided not to use because of lack of documentation (from repository I was not able to get idea what exactly his code does).

This solution stores mtimes in a file .mtimes in git repository, updates them accordingly on commits (jsut selectively the mtimes of staged files) and applies them on checkout. It works even with cygwin/mingw versions of git (but you may need to copy some files from standard cygwin into git's folder)

The solution consists of 3 files:

  1. mtimestore - core script providing 3 option -a (save all - for initialization in already existing repo (works with git-versed files)), -s (to save staged changes), and -r to restore them. This actually comes in 2 versions - a bash one (portable, nice, easy to read/modify), and c version (messy one but fast, because mingw bash is horribly slow which makes impossible to use the bash solution on big projects).
  2. pre-commit hook
  3. post-checkout hook

pre-commit:

#!/bin/bash
mtimestore -s
git add .mtimes

post-checkout

#!/bin/bash
mtimestore -r
git update-index --refresh

mtimestore - bash:

#!/bin/bash

function usage {
echo "Usage: mtimestore (-a|-s|-r)"
echo "Option    Meaning"
echo " -a   save-all - saves state of all files in a git repository"
echo " -s   save - saves mtime of all staged files of git repository"
echo " -r   restore - touches all files saved in .mtimes file"
exit 1
}

function echodate {
  echo "touch -c -d \"$(stat -c %y "$1")\" \"$1\"" >> .mtimes
}

while getopts ":sar" optname
do
  case "$optname" in
    "s")
      echo "saving changes of staged files to file .mtimes"
      if [ -f .mtimes ]
      then
        mv .mtimes .mtimes_tmp
        pattern=""
        for str in $( git diff --name-only --staged )
        do
          if [ "$pattern" != "" ]
          then
            pattern="$pattern|"
          else
            pattern="$pattern|$str" 
          fi
        done
        cat .mtimes_tmp | grep -vhF "($pattern)" >> .mtimes
      else
        echo "warning: file .mtimes does not exist - creating new"
        echo "#!/bin/bash" >> .mtimes
      fi

      for str in $(git diff --name-only --staged )
      do
       echodate "$str" 
      done
      rm .mtimes_tmp 2> /dev/null
      ;;
    "a")
      echo "saving mtimes of all files to file .mtimes"
      rm .mtimes 2> /dev/null
      echo "#!/bin/bash" >> .mtimes
      for str in $(git ls-files)
      do
        echodate "$str"
      done
      ;;
    "r")
      echo "restorim dates from .mtimes"
      if [ -f .mtimes ]
      then
        bash .mtimes
      else
        echo "warning: .mtimes not found"
      fi
      ;;
    ":")
      usage
      ;;
    *)
      usage
      ;;
  esac
done
exit 0

mtimestore - c

#include <time.h>
#include <utime.h>
#include <sys/stat.h>
#include <iostream>
#include <cstdlib>
#include <fstream>
#include <string>
#include <cerrno>
#include <cstring>
#include <sys/types.h>
#include <ctime>

std::ofstream outputfile;

void changedate(int time, const char* filename)
{
    try
    {
        struct utimbuf new_times;
        struct stat foo;
        stat(filename, &foo);

        new_times.actime = foo.st_atime;
        new_times.modtime = time;
        utime(filename, &new_times);
    }
    catch(...)
    {}
}

void parsenum(int& num, char*& ptr)
{
    num = 0;
    while(isdigit(*ptr))
    {
        num = num*10 + (int)(*ptr) - 48;
        ptr++;
    }
}

//rozdělí line na číselnou část, a textovou část - číselnou vrátí do time, a ptr nastaví na pozici v line, kde začíná filename
void parseline(const char* line, int& time, char*& ptr)
{
    time = 0;
    ptr = (char*)line;
    parsenum(time, ptr);
    ptr++;
}


//získej datum a zapiš ho do souboru
void echodate(const char* filename)
{
    try
    {
        struct stat foo;
        int err = stat(filename, &foo);
        outputfile << foo.st_mtime << "|" << filename << std::endl;
    }
    catch(...)
    {}
}

//nahraď \n na konci řádků (jinak je interpretován součástí názvu)
void trim(char* string)
{
    char* ptr = string;
    while(*ptr != '\0')
    {
        if(*ptr == '\n')
            *ptr = '\0';
        ptr++;
    }
}


void help()
{
    std::cout << "usage: mtimestore <switch>" << std::endl;
    std::cout << "options:" << std::endl;
    std::cout << "  -a  saves mtimes of all git-versed files into .mtimes file (meant to be done on intialization of mtime fixes)" << std::endl;
    std::cout << "  -s  saves mtimes of modified staged files into .mtimes file(meant to be put into pre-commit hook)" << std::endl;
    std::cout << "  -r  restores mtimes from .mtimes file (that is meant to be stored in repository server-side and to be called in post-checkout hook)" << std::endl;
    std::cout << "  -g  <file list> generates records of files in list (i.e. \"mtimestore -g */*.cpp\") - this does NOT filter already existing records" << std::endl;
    std::cout << "  -h  show this help" << std::endl;
}

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    //parsuj options podle unixového standardu
    if(argc >= 2 && argv[1][0] == '-')
    {
        switch(argv[1][1])
        {
        case 'r':
        {
            std::cout << "restoring real modification dates" << std::endl;
            std::string line;
            std::ifstream myfile (".mtimes");
            if (myfile.is_open())
            {
                while ( myfile.good() )
                {
                    getline (myfile,line);
                    int time, time2;
                    char* ptr;
                    parseline(line.c_str(), time, ptr);
                    changedate(time, ptr);
                }
                myfile.close();
            }
        }
            break;
        case 'g':
            std::cout << "saving modification times" << std::endl;
            outputfile.open(".mtimes", std::ios::out | std::ios::app);
            for(int i = 2; i < argc; i++)
                echodate(argv[i]);
            outputfile.close();
            break;
        case 'a':
            system("rm .mtimes");
        case 's':
        {
            std::cout << "saving modification times" << std::endl;
            char path[2048];
            if(argv[1][1] == 's') //projed aktualni .mtimes grepem na vyhazeni zaznamu, ktere chceme updatovat
            {
                std::string pattern = "";
                FILE *fp = popen("git diff --name-only --staged -z", "r"); //otevira output prikazu pusteneho c prostredi bashe
                bool first = true;
                while(fgets(path, 1024, fp) != NULL)
                {
                    trim(path);
                    if(!first)
                        pattern.append("\\|");
                    pattern.append("|");
                    pattern.append(path);
                    first = false;
                }
                if(!first)
                {
                    system("mv .mtimes .mtimes_tmp");
                    std::string command = "cat .mtimes_tmp | grep -vh \"\\(";
                    command.append(pattern);
                    command.append("\\)\" >> .mtimes");
                    system(command.c_str());
                    system("rm .mtimes_tmp");
                }
            }

            outputfile.open(".mtimes", std::ios::out | std::ios::app);

            FILE *fp;
            if(argv[1][1] == 'a')
                fp = popen("git ls-files -z", "r");
            else
                fp = popen("git diff --name-only --staged -z", "r");
            while(fgets(path, 2048, fp) != NULL)
            {
                trim(path);
                echodate(path);
            }
            outputfile.close();

        }
            break;
        default:
            help();
            return 0;
        }
    }
    else
    {
        help();
        return 0;
    }

    return 0;
}
  • note that hooks can be placed into template-directory to automatize their placement

for feedback/questions/contribution/whatever please visit

http://84.42.186.246/blog/index.php?page=page&id=116
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I'm working on a project where a keep a clone of my repository for use with rsync based deployments. I use branches to target different environments and git checkout causes the file modifications to change.

Having learnt that git does not provide a way to checkout files and preserve timestamps I came across the command git log --format=format:%ai --name-only . in another SO question: List last commit dates for a large number of files, quickly.

I'm now using the following script to touch my project files and directories so that my deployment with rsync is easier to diff:

#!/usr/bin/env php
<?php
$lines = explode("\n", shell_exec('git log --format=format:%ai --name-only .'));
$times = array();
$time  = null;
$cwd   = isset($argv[1]) ? $argv[1] : getcwd();
$dirs  = array();

foreach ($lines as $line) {
    if ($line === '') {
        $time = null;
    } else if ($time === null) {
        $time = strtotime($line);
    } else {
        $path = $cwd . DIRECTORY_SEPARATOR . $line;
        if (file_exists($path)) {
            $parent = dirname($path);
            $dirs[$parent] = max(isset($parent) ? $parent : 0, $time);
            touch($path, $time);
        }
    }
}

foreach ($dirs as $dir => $time) {
    touch($dir, $time);
}
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