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I see a ton a questions for converting for loops to while and do while loops, but I cant seem to find anything on converting while loops to do while loops in C++. It still needs to maintain the same function as the original code as well.

Here is the original code:

int number, product = 1, count = 0; 

cout << "Enter a whole number to be included in the product" 
<< endl << "or enter 0 to end the input: "; 
cin >> number; 

while (number != 0) 
{
product = product * number; 
count++; 
cout << "Enter a whole number to be included in the product" 
<< endl << "or enter 0 to end the input: "; 
cin >> number; 
} 

if (count > 0) 
{ 
cout << endl << "The product is " << product << "." << endl; 
} 

By moving it around, I was able to end up here, but I keep ending up with errors. When I run the program, it prompts me to enter a while number, like expected. If I enter a valid number, it loops and asks me the same question. Then when I enter 0, it kicks out as usual, but it displays that the product is 0 no matter the numbers entered before.

Here is my attempt at adjusting it into a do while loop:

int main()
{   

int number, product = 1, count = 0; 

do
{
    cout << "Enter a whole number to be included in the product" << endl << "or enter 0 to end the input: "; 
    cin >> number; 
    product = product * number; 
    count++; 
}

while (number != 0);
{
    if (count > 0) 
    cout << endl << "The product is " << product << "." << endl; 
}
}
share|improve this question
2  
what errors, please be specific. –  sraok Oct 28 '13 at 21:32
    
Edited the original post to include that information –  Simsyy Oct 28 '13 at 21:35
    
The main difference is you're executing the body before 1st check of the condition. That might nee a lot of logic adaption inside the loop's body! –  πάντα ῥεῖ Oct 28 '13 at 21:37
    
@Simsyy Can't spot any significant difference about showing errors ... –  πάντα ῥεῖ Oct 28 '13 at 21:38
    
For starters, always verify that your input was successful after the attempt to read. This typically leads to loops looking like while (std::cin >> value) { ... }. I have so never had any do { ... } while (...)-loop survive it into production code so far (admittedly, I'm programming professionally only since about 15 years so it may eventually happen). –  Dietmar Kühl Oct 28 '13 at 21:39

7 Answers 7

up vote 3 down vote accepted

In the do .. while loop when you insert 0, first you multiply product by 0, than it exists. Therefore the product is always 0.

Move the product before:

int count = -1, number = 1, product = 1; 
do
{
    count++;
    product = product * number; // you can use product *= number;
    cout << "Enter a whole number to be included in the product" << endl << "or enter 0 to end the input: "; 
    cin >> number;
}    
while (number != 0);

if (count > 0) 
    cout << endl << "The product is " << product << "." << endl;

Note: my code does not use additional if and still preserve the same functionality.

share|improve this answer

test number!=0 before assigning product = product*nuumber

otherwise, when user enters 0, you multiply by 0 and exit the loop

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or better: change the loop so that it ends by reading the user input –  vincentB Oct 28 '13 at 21:41

The problem is that in the do-while version, when the user inputs 0 this line:

product = product * number;

is executed, whereas in the while version not.

Because of this the product will always be 0.

If the number is 0 just don't multiply product.

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Your problem was the number input on exit is 0, which makes your whole product equal to 0. Try this logic:

#include <iostream>

int main() {

    int number = 0, product = 1, count = 0;

    do {
        std::cout << "Enter a whole number to be included in the product" << std::endl << "or enter 0 to end the input: ";
        std::cin >> number;
        if (number > 0) {
            product = product * number;
            count++;
        }
    } while (number != 0);
    {
        if (count > 0)
            std::cout << std::endl << "The product is " << product << "." << std::endl;
    }
}
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If you just want to solve the problem that you are getting a 0 as your answer, then the problem is due to the following lines

cin >> number; 
product = product * number; 

you take the number which is 0 and multiply it with the product and obviously the result will be 0.

you can fix it by putting a break statement.

cin >> number;
if(number == 0)
break;
product = product * number;

However, in general I am not sure what you are achieving by trying to solve this problem i.e. converting a while to a do-while.

share|improve this answer
int number, product = 1, count = 0; 

cout << "Enter a whole number to be included in the product" 
     << endl << "or enter 0 to end the input: "; 
cin >> number; // you enter a non-0 number here

while (number != 0) // you now loop until you hit 0 ...
{
    product = product * number; 
    count++; 
    cout << "Enter a whole number to be included in the product" 
         << endl << "or enter 0 to end the input: "; 
    cin >> number; // you overwrite the non-0 number you had previously input
} 

if (count > 0) 
{ 
    cout << endl << "The product is " << product << "." << endl; 
}

Without knowing the full context of your program, I'm guessing here, but you can probably rewrite it as:

int number = 0, product = 1, count = 0; 

do
{
    cout << "Enter a whole number to be included in the product" 
         << endl << "or enter 0 to end the input: ";
    cin >> number;
    if (number != 0)
    {
        count++;
        product *= number;
    } 
} while (number != 0); // exit the loop when you have a non-zero entry

if (count > 0) 
{ 
    cout << endl << "The product is " << product << "." << endl; 
}

Or ...

int number = 0, product = 1; 

do
{
    cout << "Enter a whole number to be included in the product" 
         << endl << "or enter 0 to end the input: ";
    cin >> number;
    if (number != 0)
    {
        product *= number;
    } 
} while (number != 0); // exit the loop when you have a non-zero entry

cout << endl << "The product is " << product << "." << endl; 

You can avoid the 2nd condition since you are excluding 0 from potential inputs, and simply always output a product.

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You are increasing count regardless of the input you get. First check if the input was zero (your abort input).

Change

count++

to

if (number)
    count++;
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