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Solaris 10 SPARC
Sun Studio C compiler 12.3

On SPARC64 machines if you access a variable which isn't correctly aligned on the relevant 4 or 8 byte boundary, you will get a core dump. This requires the coder to jump through a few hoops to cope with this requirement, (but also makes you write portable code too).

If we have a C structure which models a network protocol header, (i.e. these 16 bits are a port, these 8 bits are the flags etc), if we then use alignment directives to suit a SPARC64 processor, will this still retain the byte mapping, or will everything break. Is there logic hiding the implementation of the byte storage from the layout of the struct.

typedef struct TCPHdr_
{
    uint16_t th_sport;  /**< source port */
    uint16_t th_dport;  /**< destination port */
    uint32_t th_seq;    /**< sequence number */
    uint32_t th_ack;    /**< acknowledgement number */
    uint8_t th_offx2;   /**< offset and reserved */
    uint8_t th_flags;   /**< pkt flags */
    uint16_t th_win;    /**< pkt window */
    uint16_t th_sum;    /**< checksum */
    uint16_t th_urp;    /**< urgent pointer */
} TCPHdr;

gets aligned like this:

typedef struct TCPHdr_
{
    uint16_t th_sport    __attribute__((aligned(8))); /**< source port */
    uint16_t th_dport    __attribute__((aligned(8))); /**< destination port */
    uint32_t th_seq      __attribute__((aligned(8))); /**< sequence number */
    uint32_t th_ack      __attribute__((aligned(8))); /**< acknowledgement number */
    uint8_t th_offx2     __attribute__((aligned(8))); /**< offset and reserved */
    uint8_t th_flags     __attribute__((aligned(8))); /**< pkt flags */
    uint16_t th_win      __attribute__((aligned(8))); /**< pkt window */
    uint16_t th_sum      __attribute__((aligned(8))); /**< checksum */
    uint16_t th_urp      __attribute__((aligned(8))); /**< urgent pointer */
} TCPHdr;

Mostly it's a query about code like this:

SET_PKT_LEN(p, sizeof(IPV6Hdr) + sizeof(TCPHdr) + payload_len);

and

p1->tcph = (TCPHdr *)raw_tcp;

where the raw bytes are converted to the struct or a sizeof() tests the size of the struct. Will it still work or will the new struct not be able to map the network bytes?

Thanks.

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The aligned structures will work fine as long as you access the elements as structure elements. The packet length will still be correct as per your SET_PKT_LEN line, but I'm not sure about your raw_tcp. If that came from somewhere else, where things were not aligned, then your code will surely break. Did you try it? What happened? –  Floris Oct 28 '13 at 22:46
    
I haven't tried it yet, but I suspect I'll need to do a bunch of memcpy() calls to move the raw memory into the padded TCPHdr. It's not my code I'm fixing, I'm seeking out if anyone has done it before and what's worth pursuing. –  Mark Solaris Oct 29 '13 at 0:12

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You can cast an unaligned structure to its aligned version but data would be wrong. You need to put data to the right positions in memory manually. E.g. a function *unaligned_to_aligned* can copy data field by field. It can use unions to avoid core dumps. When working with raw data from the network, take into account endianness. Network protocols and your platform can have different representation of numbers in memory and you may have to change the order of bytes in *int*s, *short*s etc.

share|improve this answer
    
Yeah that was my impression too, I am already doing that as a first round approach to porting the Suricata code, was checking if there was an easier way. There is just So. Much. Work. to do that anything helps :) –  Mark Solaris Oct 29 '13 at 0:29

For the record, here's the structs I'm using:

typedef struct TCPHdr_raw_ {
    union {
        uint16_t   th_sport;     /**< source port */
        uint8_t    th_sport8[2]; /**< source port */
    } sport;
    union {
        uint16_t   th_dport;     /**< destination port */
        uint8_t    th_dport8[2]; /**< destination port */
    } dport;
    union {
        uint32_t    th_seq;      /**< sequence number */
        uint8_t     th_seq8[4];  /**< sequence number */
    } seq;
    union {
        uint32_t    th_ack;      /**< acknowledgement number */
        uint8_t     th_ack8[4];  /**< acknowledgement number */
    } ack;
    uint8_t         th_offx2;    /**< offset and reserved */
    uint8_t         th_flags;    /**< pkt flags */
    union {
        uint16_t    th_win;      /**< pkt window */
        uint8_t     th_win8[2];  /**< pkt window */
    } win;
    union {
        uint16_t    th_sum;       /**< checksum */
        uint8_t     th_sum8[2];   /**< checksum */
    } sum;
    union {
        uint16_t    th_urp;       /**< urgent pointer */
        uint8_t     th_urp8[2];   /**< urgent pointer */
    } urp;
} TCPHdr_raw;

typedef struct TCPHdr_
{
    uint16_t th_sport  __attribute__((aligned(8))); /**< source port */
    uint16_t th_dport  __attribute__((aligned(8))); /**< destination port */
    uint32_t th_seq    __attribute__((aligned(8))); /**< sequence number */
    uint32_t th_ack    __attribute__((aligned(8))); /**< acknowledgement number */
    uint8_t th_offx2   __attribute__((aligned(8))); /**< offset and reserved */
    uint8_t th_flags   __attribute__((aligned(8))); /**< pkt flags */
    uint16_t th_win    __attribute__((aligned(8))); /**< pkt window */
    uint16_t th_sum    __attribute__((aligned(8))); /**< checksum */
    uint16_t th_urp    __attribute__((aligned(8))); /**< urgent pointer */
} TCPHdr;

and routines like this:

copy_raw_tcp_header(&(p->tcph), &tcph);

void copy_raw_tcp_header(TCPHdr *tcph, uint8_t *pktdata) {
    TCPHdr_raw *raw_tcp_hdr = (TCPHdr_raw *)pktdata;

    memcpy(&tcph->sport,  &raw_tcp_hdr->sport.th_sport8, sizeof(uint16_t));
    memcpy(&tcph->dport,  &raw_tcp_hdr->dport.th_dport8, sizeof(uint16_t));
    memcpy(&tcph->seq,    &raw_tcp_hdr->seq.th_seq8,     sizeof(uint32_t));
    memcpy(&tcph->ack,    &raw_tcp_hdr->ack.th_ack8,     sizeof(uint32_t));
    tcph->th_offx2       = raw_tcp_hdr->th_offx2;
    tcph->th_flags       = raw_tcp_hdr->th_flags;
    memcpy(&tcph->th_win, &raw_tcp_hdr->win.th_win8,     sizeof(uint16_t));
    memcpy(&tcph->th_sum, &raw_tcp_hdr->sum.th_sum8,     sizeof(uint16_t));
    memcpy(&tcph->th_urp, &raw_tcp_hdr->urp.th_urp8,     sizeof(uint16_t));
}

replace previous code like this:

p->tcph = &tcph;
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