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I would like to write a function that takes a currencyCode As String input parameter and outputs a custom currencyFormatString. My dilemma is deciding on the best (proper) way to do this. currencyCode is an ISO 4217 Currency Code (e.g. "USD", "GBP", "JPY", etc.), and I want to perform the following steps:

  1. Check for null or empty strings.
  2. Convert the code to the corresponding currency symbol (e.g. "$", "£", "¥" as in the above).
  3. Format the returning string with the appropriate symbol.

I have two cases for the formatting: with cents, and without. In the case of JPY, there are never cents, so in this case I would always return the non-cents (not nonsense, :P) format.

My latest idea is to create a Dictionary and populate it with the codes and symbols I need (FYI, we currently only need 6 codes/symbols and this very rarely changes). Is this a bad idea? Is there a better one? An XML file perhaps? I would love a code sample if you could. I'd provide one myself, but it's a scrambled mess of failed/less-than-ideal attempts at this point.

SOLUTIONS -- Based on hours of research, trial and error, and input from @tinstaafl.

'Method 1: Using Enumerable Type with Character Codes
'  Limitation: Does not support currency symbols with more than one character.
Public Module SLCurrency
    Enum ISOCurrency
        USD = 36
        CAD = 36
        AUD = 36
        EUR = 8364
        GBP = 163
        JPY = 165
    End Enum

    Public Function GetCurrencyFormat(ByVal currencyCode As String, ByVal withCents As Boolean) As String
        Dim _numberFormatString, _currency As New ISOCurrency

        [Enum].TryParse(Of ISOCurrency)(currencyCode, _currency)

        If withCents AndAlso Not _curr.Equals(ISOCurrency.JPY) Then
            _numberFormatString = "{0}* #,##0.00;[Red]{0}* (#,##0.00);{0}* ""-"";@"
        Else
            _numberFormatString = "{0}* #,##0;[Red]{0}* (#,##0);{0}* ""-"";@"
        End If

        Return String.Format(_numberFormatString, ChrW(_currency).ToString.Trim({ChrW(0)}))
    End Function
End Module
'Method 2: Using a Dictionary of Currency Codes (key) and Symbols
'  Advantage: Support currency symbols with more than one character,
'  but is not quite as clean and can be more complex to implement.
Public Module SLCurrency
    Dim CurrencyDict As New Dictionary(Of String, String) From {
        {"USD", "$"}, {"CAD", "$"}, {"AUD", "$"}, {"EUR", "€"}, {"GBP", "£"}, {"JPY", "¥"}
    }

    Public Function GetCurrencyFormat(ByVal currencyCode As String, ByVal withCents As Boolean) As String
        Dim _numberFormatString, _currency As String
        _currency = String.Empty

        CurrencyDict.TryGetValue(currencyCode, _currency)

        If withCents AndAlso Not _currency.Equals("JPY") Then
            _numberFormatString = "{0}* #,##0.00;[Red]{0}* (#,##0.00);{0}* ""-"";@"
        Else
            _numberFormatString = "{0}* #,##0;[Red]{0}* (#,##0);{0}* ""-"";@"
        End If

        Return String.Format(_numberFormatString, _currency)
    End Function
End Module

I always welcome comments on my solutions. It helps me become a better programmer. :)

At this point, I think I'll go with Method 1 to keep the code a bit simpler as I do not anticipate a need for the added complexity to support longer currency symbols, especially since most of them are very obscure currencies which a business would be highly unlikely to ever accept as payment anyway.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

One simple way would be to create an enum with the value being the character code of the symbol:

Enum CurrencySymbols
    USD = 36
    GBP = 163
    JPY = 165
End Enum

A simple function to convert a string to enum value and return it as a string, could look something like this:

Private Function GetCurr(Input As String) As String
    Dim CurrCode As New CurrencySymbols
    If [Enum].TryParse(Of CurrencySymbols)(Input, CurrCode) Then
        GetCurr = ChrW(CurrCode)
    Else
        GetCurr = ChrW(0)
    End If
End Function

If the string is invalid this will return string with a character with code 0

share|improve this answer
    
Unless there's some programming magic I haven't learned yet to convert a string input to a corresponding Enum, this isn't going to work. I appreciate the thought though. :) –  Chiramisu Oct 29 '13 at 7:52
    
The Enum class has available methods –  tinstaafl Oct 29 '13 at 14:01
    
Ok, cool, that could definitely help someone and is worth noting. However, in my case, I need to take the ISO Currency Code (as a string), NOT Character Code (as an Enum), and convert it to the Currency Symbol. Then build my Currency Format string. FYI, this is for use with the SpreedsheetLight library, namely the SLStyle.FormatCode property. :) –  Chiramisu Oct 29 '13 at 15:31
    
The function I showed you takes a string("USD","GBP" or "JPY"), as per your post, and returns a string with the currency symbol("$","£" or "¥") as the only character in that string. From there it should be a simple matter to build the format string incorporating the return from this function. –  tinstaafl Oct 29 '13 at 16:55
1  
To include the complexity of Currency Symbols with multiple characters, you'll probably have to go with a more complex structure. A Dictionary(Of String,List(Of Byte)) and a TextFile loaded as a resource to load the dictionary, would work. If your text file is an inclusive list you can use a setting to know which codes to load. This way you only have to re-compile the app if the list becomes too outdated. –  tinstaafl Oct 29 '13 at 20:11

It is up to you to decide which solution suits you and your task better, but one thing is for sure: you need a functionality somewhere which initializes these currencies, which is called at the initialization phase of your application and then you can use any currency through a getter.

Of course, you can use a dictionary. Also, you can use an XML file if you are sure no untrusted people will access it. Finally, you can store all these information into a database as well. So everything depends on your decision.

share|improve this answer
    
Do you have a recommendation on how to implement the initialization as you mentioned? If you could give me a code snippet to get me pointed in the right direction for that as well as maybe a dictionary implementation that would be very helpful. I'm especially interested in the "best practice" solution that will create an extensible code base. Best. :) –  Chiramisu Oct 29 '13 at 7:56

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