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I am working on creating a playfair cipher for python and I am having trouble indexing the location of a letter in the table provided below.

     [['A', 'B', 'C', 'D', 'E'],
     ['F', 'G', 'H', 'I', 'Y'],
     ['K', 'L', 'M', 'N', 'O'],
     ['P', 'Q', 'R', 'S', 'T'],
     ['U', 'V', 'W', 'X', 'Z']]

I was wondering how I would be able to find the location of a letter in the table which gives an output of row and column.

I've looked online for different solutions, but I can't seem to make it work properly.

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1  
"Strings" are one dimensional ("fabric" is a fairly unknown concept in programming), you have lists :P –  Nick T Oct 29 '13 at 0:49
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6 Answers 6

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Is this what you're looking for?

def find_index(table, letter):
    for r_index, row in enumerate(table):
        if letter in row:
            return (r_index, row.index(letter))

You iterate through the table, and search for the index of the letter in each row.


Alternatively, if you're constantly searching in the matrix, it might be more efficient to convert it to a dict so you get O(1) access:

def get_index_map(table):
    output = {}
    for r_index, row in enumerate(table):
        for c_index, letter in enumerate(row):
            output[letter] = (r_index, c_index)
    return output

Then, you can just call this function once at the start of your program, and use the returned dict to find the row and column number of each letter.

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Thank you very much for helping me. I believe that this will work. –  user2930168 Oct 29 '13 at 1:06
    
+1 for dict approach. –  Mark Thomas Oct 29 '13 at 1:10
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data = [['A', 'B', 'C', 'D', 'E'],
     ['F', 'G', 'H', 'I', 'Y'],
     ['K', 'L', 'M', 'N', 'O'],
     ['P', 'Q', 'R', 'S', 'T'],
     ['U', 'V', 'W', 'X', 'Z']]

search = "I"

for rowIdx, row in enumerate(data):
    if search in row:
        print rowIdx, row.index(search)
        break

Output

1 3
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Thanks for the quick response. This way also works for me. –  user2930168 Oct 29 '13 at 1:07
    
@user2930168 You are welcome :) –  thefourtheye Oct 29 '13 at 1:15
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from itertools import product

li = [['A', 'B', 'C', 'D', 'E'],
     ['F', 'G', 'H', 'I', 'Y'],
     ['K', 'L', 'M', 'N', 'O'],
     ['P', 'Q', 'R', 'S', 'T'],
     ['U', 'V', 'W', 'X', 'Z']]

letter = 'P'

for i, j in product(range(len(li)),range(len(li[0]))):
    if li[i][j] == letter:
        print (i,j)
        break
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Here is another way:

matrix=[['A', 'B', 'C', 'D', 'E'],
     ['F', 'G', 'H', 'I', 'Y'],
     ['K', 'L', 'M', 'N', 'O'],
     ['P', 'Q', 'R', 'S', 'T'],
     ['U', 'V', 'W', 'X', 'Z']]

def index(letter, matrix):
    for i,li in enumerate(matrix):
        try:
            j=li.index(letter)
            return i,j
        except ValueError:
            pass    

    raise ValueError("'{}' not in matrix".format(letter))

print index('H', matrix)     
# (1, 2) 
print index('a', matrix) 
# ValueError
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Won't catching the exceptions consume more time? –  thefourtheye Oct 29 '13 at 1:14
    
I like the way you wrote this. It was easy for me to understand and helped me a lot. I appreciate the time you spent helping me. –  user2930168 Oct 29 '13 at 1:14
    
@thefourtheye: Well it is not the fastest way to do it true but it is idiomatic. :-) –  dawg Oct 29 '13 at 1:44
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My take:

>>> lst = [['A', 'B', 'C', 'D', 'E'],
...        ['F', 'G', 'H', 'I', 'Y'],
...        ['K', 'L', 'M', 'N', 'O'],
...        ['P', 'Q', 'R', 'S', 'T'],
...        ['U', 'V', 'W', 'X', 'Z']]
>>> get = "S"
>>> {x:y.index(get) for x,y in enumerate(lst) if get in y}
{3: 3}
>>> get = "V"
>>> {x:y.index(get) for x,y in enumerate(lst) if get in y}
{4: 1}
>>>
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That is great!! –  dawg Oct 29 '13 at 1:07
    
@drewk - Thank you. :) Gotta love the comprehensions! –  iCodez Oct 29 '13 at 1:10
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Here is my weird way. :) Note: Python 2.7 so / means integer division.

table = [['A', 'B', 'C', 'D', 'E'],
         ['F', 'G', 'H', 'I', 'Y'],
         ['K', 'L', 'M', 'N', 'O'],
         ['P', 'Q', 'R', 'S', 'T'],
         ['U', 'V', 'W', 'X', 'Z']]

tablestring = ''.join(''.join(row) for row in table)
x = tablestring.index('V')
i = x / (len(tablestring) / len(table))
j = x % (len(tablestring) / len(table))
print i, j
print table[i][j]

Prints:

4 1
V
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