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I have the following code

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <stdint.h>

typedef struct Example
{
    uint16_t a;
    uint16_t b;
} ExampleStruct;

void derp(struct Example * bar[], uint8_t i)
{
    uint8_t c;
    for(c = 0; c < i; ++c)
    {
        bar[c]->a = 1;
        bar[c]->b = 2;
    }
}

int main()
{
    struct Example * foo;
    uint8_t i = 3;
    foo = malloc(i*sizeof(ExampleStruct));
    derp(&foo, i);
    free(foo);
    return 0;
}

I get segfaults and all debuggers tell me that code stopped working due to

bar[c]->a = 1;

I tried to rearrange this into all of the following

(*bar)[c]->a = 1;
(*bar[c])->a = 1;
bar[c].a = 1;
(*bar)[c].a = 1;

and with no success. What am I doing wrong? I don't understand why is this failing, and I don't understand why the addresses of bar[0], bar[1] and bar[2] are so far away from each other, when each just takes 2 bytes.

share|improve this question
3  
Change it to struct Example* bar and derp(foo, i) and bar[c].a. That's all. Why do you pass the address of the pointer? You don't need to change the pointer. only the elements in the array. –  Elazar Oct 29 '13 at 0:58
    
Is there some specific reason you're passing foo by-address besides the function being called (which I assume you also wrote) requires it? If so, then do what Acme's answer suggests. If not, then do what Elazar's comment suggests. Without one or the other, you're invoking undefined behavior. –  WhozCraig Oct 29 '13 at 1:08
    
Because I want to use foo[c].a and foo[c].b somewhere else in main –  John Smith Oct 29 '13 at 1:16
    
I can't see how it matters. The answer I gave initializes the array you have allocated in main(). –  Elazar Oct 29 '13 at 1:19
1  
@JohnSmith, I think you are afraid of copying your array. Rest assured, the only thing copied is the address of its first element. –  Elazar Oct 29 '13 at 1:25

2 Answers 2

There's no need to pass &foo. Keep it simple:

// In a function declaration, it's (almost) always a pointer, not an array.
// "struct Example bar[]" means *exactly* the same thing in this context.
void init(struct Example * bar, int n) {
    int i;
    for (i = 0; i < n; ++i) {
        bar[i].a = 1;
        bar[i].b = 2;
    }
}

int main() {
    int n = 3;
    struct Example * foo = malloc(n*sizeof(struct Example));
    init(foo, n); // passes the address of the array - &a[0] - to init
    printf("The second element is {%u, %u}\n", foo[1].a, foo[1].b);
    free(foo);
    return 0;
}

output:

The second element is {1, 2}

share|improve this answer
1  
Ah! now i get your point!! Crap!! Sorry about the misunderstanding. –  al-Acme Oct 29 '13 at 1:36

Some changes were required since you were trying to pass array of objects:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <stdint.h>
#include <inttypes.h>
typedef struct Example
{
    uint16_t a;
    uint16_t b;
} ExampleStruct;

void derp(struct Example * bar[], uint8_t i)
{
    uint8_t c;
    for(c = 0; c < i; ++c)
    {
        bar[c]->a = 1;
        bar[c]->b = 2;
    }
}

int main()
{
    struct Example * foo[3];
    uint8_t i = 3, c;
    for(i = 0; i < 3; i++)
    foo[i] = malloc(sizeof(ExampleStruct));
    derp(foo, i);
    for(c = 0; c < i; ++c)
    {
        printf("\n%" PRIu16  " %" PRIu16 ,foo[c]->a,foo[c]->b);
    }
   for(i = 0; i < 3; i++)
   free(foo[i]);
    return 0;
}

struct Example * foo; can hold a single pointer to an object of type struct Example. While struct Example * bar[] can hold an array of pointers to objects of type struct Example.

In your original program, this will seg fault when c is greater than 0 since you did not allocate any pointers to an object of type struct Example.

bar[c]->a = 1;
bar[c]->b = 2;

For static objects:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <stdint.h>
#include <inttypes.h>
typedef struct Example
{
    uint16_t a;
    uint16_t b;
} ExampleStruct;

void derp(struct Example  bar[], uint8_t i)
{
    uint8_t c;
    for(c = 0; c < i; ++c)
    {
        bar[c].a = 1;
        bar[c].b = 2;
    }
}

int main()
{
    struct Example  foo[3];
    uint8_t i = 3, c;
    derp(foo, i);
    for(c = 0; c < i; ++c)
    {
        printf("\n%" PRIu16  " %" PRIu16 ,foo[c].a,foo[c].b); //accessing in main
    }
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Why the downvote? This is crazy. –  al-Acme Oct 29 '13 at 1:03
1  
I think your suggestion complicates things for no reason. The OP wants to work with an array of structs. The pointer-to-pointer thing is part of the problem, not part of the solution. –  Elazar Oct 29 '13 at 1:06
    
So why should the answer be downvoted when there is nothing wrong in it. It all depends how we understand the question, i wanted to give a solution which would fix OP's code without too many changes. The question is about writing to an array of structs - and that could also be done with pointers. –  al-Acme Oct 29 '13 at 1:08
    
"This answer is not useful". However, @WhozCraig explained why it may be useful in the comments. –  Elazar Oct 29 '13 at 1:12

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