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There's gotta be an easy way to do this, but can't seem to wrap my head around it. I have a list like,

l = [3,3,3,4,4,4,4,2,2,2,2,3,3,3,3,3,3,3,3,3,2,2,5,5,5,5,5,3,3,3,3,3,3] 

It's a list of integers that repeat a number of times given by the integer, for example if the integer in the list is 5, it repeats 5 times. I would like to preserve the structure of the list and convert it some thing like,

l = [3,-1,-1,4,-1,-1,-1,2,-1,2,-1,3,-1,-1,3,-1,-1,3,-1,-1,2,-1,2,-1,5,-1,-1,-1,-1,3,-1,-1,3,-1,-1]

Replace the repeated integers with -1. I want to keep the first integer N and replace the repeating integers behind it by N-1 -1's. My problem is the case when the same integer is next to each other. In that case I am getting,

l = [3,-1,-1,4,-1,-1,-1,2,-1,-1,-1,3,-1,-1,-1,-1,-1,-1,-1,-1,2,-1,-1,-1,5,-1,-1,-1,-1,3,-1,-1,-1,-1,-1] 

Can any one think of a way to resolve this?

So far I have the code,

def idx(List):
    xList = []
    xList.append(List[0])
    for i in range(0, len(List)):
        if (i+1) in range(len(List)):
            if List[i] == List[i+1]:
                xList.append(-1)
            elif tscList[i] != List[i+1]:
                xList.append(List[i+1])
        else:
            break
    return xList

It does not take into account repeating integers. I can't really see an easy way to count the position of the integers in a loop without it getting reset or continue to count.

Thanks for any help on this.

share|improve this question
    
I did not unaccept it, I just home from work and saw this. Thanks again. – rlmlr Oct 29 '13 at 2:05
up vote 4 down vote accepted

It is easier to use itertools.groupby(), then use some iteration magic to produce the desired output:

from itertools import groupby, cycle

output = [res for k, g in groupby(l) for orig, res in zip(g, cycle([k] + [-1] * (k - 1)))]

This produces:

>>> from itertools import groupby, cycle
>>> l = [3,3,3,4,4,4,4,2,2,2,2,3,3,3,3,3,3,3,3,3,2,2,5,5,5,5,5,3,3,3,3,3,3] 
>>> [res for k, g in groupby(l) for orig, res in zip(g, cycle([k] + [-1] * (k - 1)))]
[3, -1, -1, 4, -1, -1, -1, 2, -1, 2, -1, 3, -1, -1, 3, -1, -1, 3, -1, -1, 2, -1, 5, -1, -1, -1, -1, 3, -1, -1, 3, -1, -1]

groupby() with no key function groups on equality; you get groups of the same repeated number. Thus, you first get the 3s in a group, then the 4s, etc. We then zip up each group with a cycling iterable of the group number followed by enough -1 values to replace the rest of the count. The length of the group determines how often we cycle; zip() stops when the shortest iterable (g, the group) is done. Thus, [2, 2, 2, 2] paired with a cycling [2, -1] becomes [2, -1, 2, -1].

share|improve this answer
    
+1 This is some beautifully complex code. – inspectorG4dget Oct 29 '13 at 1:16
    
@inspectorG4dget: I removed the chain(); it wasn't really useful here. – Martijn Pieters Oct 29 '13 at 1:18
    
~~I +1d before I noticed that it's actually not the right output. OP does not want to cycle [3, -1, -1] for a long chain of 3s in the input; OP wants a single 3 and everything else replaced by -1.~~ Never mind, I misread the OP! And here I was trying to solve what is actually a much harder problem when you use those kinds of tools ;) – Karl Knechtel Oct 29 '13 at 1:37
    
@KarlKnechtel: if the rest of the group needed to be replaced by -1 regardless of repeats, it is actually just as easy; you can then just cycle over [-1] instead. – Martijn Pieters Oct 29 '13 at 1:48
    
... sort of? You'd need to chain a k onto the -1 values, yeah? – Karl Knechtel Oct 29 '13 at 1:48
In [15]: %paste
def idx(L):
  answer = []
  i = 0
  while i<len(L):
    answer.extend([L[i]]+[-1]*(L[i]-1))
    i += L[i]
  return answer

## -- End pasted text --

In [16]: idx(L)
Out[16]: [3, -1, -1, 4, -1, -1, -1, 2, -1, 2, -1, 3, -1, -1, 3, -1, -1, 3, -1, -1, 2, -1, 5, -1, -1, -1, -1, 3, -1, -1, 3, -1, -1]
share|improve this answer

Do you want something like this?

def idx(List):
    xList = List
    i=0
    while i < len(List):
        num = xList[i] - 1
        xList[i+1 : i+num+1] = [-1] * num
        i += num + 1

return xList

edit: it looks like you'll need to add special cases for anything <= 1, but apart from that, this should work

share|improve this answer
    
bit of a rushed typo, I fixed it – Red Alert Oct 29 '13 at 1:16
1  
You're destroying the input. You need to do xList = List[:] if you want to avoid doing that – inspectorG4dget Oct 29 '13 at 1:17

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