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According to the Concurrency with Core Data Guide, you should not save a NSManagedObjectContext in a background thread, because it is possible for the app to quit before the save completes, since threads are detached.

If I'm understanding correctly, that means something like this is incorrect

dispatch_async(dispatch_get_global_queue(DISPATCH_QUEUE_PRIORITY_BACKGROUND, 0), ^{
    NSManagedObjectContext* tempContext = [[NSManagedObjectContext alloc] initWithConcurrencyType:NSPrivateQueueConcurrencyType];
    [tempContext setParentContext:[[MyDataManager sharedInstance] mainContext];
    [tempContext performBlockAndWait:^{
         //Do some processing
        NSError* error;
        [tempContext save:&error];
    }];
});

My first instinct would be to just save the context on the main queue when it's finished, but managedObjectContexts are supposed to be thread safe. Is the following something that would solve the problem or is there a better solution?

dispatch_async(dispatch_get_global_queue(DISPATCH_QUEUE_PRIORITY_BACKGROUND, 0), ^{
    NSManagedObjectContext* tempContext = [[NSManagedObjectContext alloc] initWithConcurrencyType:NSPrivateQueueConcurrencyType];
    [tempContext setParentContext:[[MyDataManager sharedInstance] mainContext];
    [tempContext performBlockAndWait:^{
        //Do some processing
    }];
    dispatch_async(dispatch_get_main_queue(), ^{
        [tempContext performBlockAndWait:^{
            NSError* error;
            [tempContext save:&error];
        }];
    });
});
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1 Answer 1

First:

In your first example:
The [context save:...] should be done in the context's performBlockAndWait: block.
Also, if you are using a background context, you could simply call its performBlock: method, as it is already use GCD for dispatching, so it will look something like:

NSManagedObjectContext* tempContext = [[NSManagedObjectContext alloc] initWithConcurrencyType:NSPrivateQueueConcurrencyType];
[tempContext setParentContext:[[MyDataManager sharedInstance] mainContext];
[tempContext performBlock:^{
    //Do some processing
    NSError* error;
    [tempContext save:&error];
}];

Secondly:

"Saving in a Background Thread is Error-prone" (as I know it and understand it) means:
You can save in the background, but it is NOT guaranteed that the save you called will run to completion if the application quit (the database would still be valid, or could be rolled back to a pre-partial-save state).
==>
If you use background save, don't assume that a save operation has completed between 2 application executions.

Thirdly (just to emphasise):
DON'T use a private-queue context without performBlock: or performBlockAndWait:
==>
Your second example will lead to unexpected behavior

share|improve this answer
    
Ok calling the save in performBlock makes sense, but is there a way to ensure the background save fully completes before the application quits? –  adamF Oct 29 '13 at 23:10
    
As I mentioned in my second point, NO. That is the difference between a main-thread save and a background save. if you have critical information that must be saved, do it on the main thread. –  Dan Shelly Oct 30 '13 at 1:51
    
Thanks, but my original question is how can I actually do that? You said my second example will lead to unexpected behavior. Is it because I didn't use performBlock or is it because it is a private queue context being executed on the main thread? Please see my edited question. What is the correct way to save on the main thread? –  adamF Oct 30 '13 at 16:16
    
Your second example was wrong due to a save not done within the private-queue context performBlock... method. Your application might be terminated at any moment by the user without notice (in the background). this would mean that all saves that has not completed will not complete (event on the main thread). The reason you should save on the main thread is to give the user a consistent experience (the user performed an action with permanent effect, this should be reflected in the next application run ==> save on main thread) –  Dan Shelly Oct 31 '13 at 4:37
    
Okay so my second example is now correct such that the save is executed on the main thread and will always finish? –  adamF Nov 1 '13 at 15:22

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