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I would like to place a "please wait, loading" spinning circle animation on my site. Where can I find a JQuery "Please wait, loading" animation plugin?

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marked as duplicate by George Stocker Sep 25 '13 at 13:28

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

10 Answers

up vote 303 down vote accepted

You could do this various different ways. It could be a subtle as a small status on the page saying "Loading...", or as loud as an entire element graying out the page while the new data is loading. The approach I'm taking below will show you how to accomplish both methods.

The Setup

Let's start by getting us a nice "loading" animation from http://ajaxload.info ( I'll be using http://i.stack.imgur.com/FhHRx.gif ).

Let's create an element that we can show/hide anytime we're making an ajax request:

<div class="modal"><!-- Place at bottom of page --></div>

The CSS

Next let's give it some flair:

/* Start by setting display:none to make this hidden.
   Then we position it in relation to the viewport window
   with position:fixed. Width, height, top and left speak
   speak for themselves. Background we set to 80% white with
   our animation centered, and no-repeating */
.modal {
    display:    none;
    position:   fixed;
    z-index:    1000;
    top:        0;
    left:       0;
    height:     100%;
    width:      100%;
    background: rgba( 255, 255, 255, .8 ) 
                url('http://i.stack.imgur.com/FhHRx.gif') 
                50% 50% 
                no-repeat;
}

/* When the body has the loading class, we turn
   the scrollbar off with overflow:hidden */
body.loading {
    overflow: hidden;   
}

/* Anytime the body has the loading class, our
   modal element will be visible */
body.loading .modal {
    display: block;
}

And finally, the jQuery

Alright, on to the jQuery. This next part is actually really simple:

$body = $("body");

$(document).on({
    ajaxStart: function() { $body.addClass("loading");    },
     ajaxStop: function() { $body.removeClass("loading"); }    
});

That's it! We're attaching some events to the body element anytime the ajaxStart or ajaxStop events are fired. When an ajax event starts, we add the "loading" class to the body. and when events are done, we remove the "loading" class from the body.

See it in action: http://jsfiddle.net/VpDUG/4952/

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1  
This is the most in depth solution although I'd recommend you use a centering plugin which centers the preloader around a page element (i.e. body, #element, or .element) –  cballou Dec 27 '09 at 1:46
18  
+1 for a really awesome explanation –  MUG4N Sep 22 '11 at 14:06
4  
I had to use .bind() instead of .on() as we are using jQuery 1.5.1! –  renegadeMind Jul 10 '12 at 15:09
4  
I love when something just works. There's a reason @JonathanSampson has 68k rep. –  Mike S. Jul 11 '12 at 19:16
3  
Note: As of jQuery 1.8, the .ajaxStop() and .ajaxStart() method should only be attached to document. docs –  balexandre Nov 21 '13 at 8:42
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Along with what Jonathan and Samir suggested (both excellent answers btw!), jQuery has some built in events that it'll fire for you when making an ajax request.

There's the ajaxStart event

Show a loading message whenever an AJAX request starts (and none is already active).

...and it's brother, the ajaxStop event

Attach a function to be executed whenever all AJAX requests have ended. This is an Ajax Event.

Together, they make a fine way to show a progress message when any ajax activity is happening anywhere on the page.

HTML:

<div id="loading">
  <p><img src="loading.gif" /> Please Wait</p>
</div>

Script:

$(document).ajaxStart(function(){
    $('#loading').show();
 }).ajaxStop(function(){
    $('#loading').hide();
 });
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8  
That's brilliant. Had no idea these existed. –  Samir Talwar Dec 28 '09 at 2:40
    
This is outdated, as of 1.8.0, .ajaxStart can only be attached to document, ie. $(document).ajaxStart(function(){}). –  Jonno_FTW Apr 14 at 3:10
    
@Jonno_FTW fixed. Ta. Old question and answer that's been superceded by Jonathan Sampson's edits to his question, but good to keep it up to date anyway –  Dan F Apr 15 at 22:06
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You can grab an animated GIF of a spinning circle from Ajaxload - stick that somewhere in your website file heirarchy. Then you just need to add an HTML element with the correct code, and remove it when you're done. This is fairly simple:

function showLoadingImage() {
    $('#yourParentElement').append('<div id="loading-image"><img src="path/to/loading.gif" alt="Loading..." /></div>');
}

function hideLoadingImage() {
    $('#loading-image').remove();
}

You then just need to use these methods in your AJAX call:

$.load(
     'http://example.com/myurl',
     { 'random': 'data': 1: 2, 'dwarfs': 7},
     function (responseText, textStatus, XMLHttpRequest) {
         hideLoadingImage();
     }
);

// this will be run immediately after the AJAX call has been made,
// not when it completes.
showLoadingImage();

This has a few caveats: first of all, if you have two or more places the loading image can be shown, you're going to need to kep track of how many calls are running at once somehow, and only hide when they're all done. This can be done using a simple counter, which should work for almost all cases.

Secondly, this will only hide the loading image on a successful AJAX call. To handle the error states, you'll need to look into $.ajax, which is more complex than $.load, $.get and the like, but a lot more flexible too.

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Thanks for the reply. But tell me, why do I need to use AJAX at all? Can't I simply track down it all in the page itself? –  thedp Dec 27 '09 at 23:18
    
What exactly do you want to track? Unless you're requesting information after the page has loaded (and AJAX is pretty much the only way to do that without using a plugin), why would you need a "loading" image at all? –  Samir Talwar Dec 28 '09 at 2:39
    
Samir Talwar: A heavy JavaScript application actually. Thanks, I get the idea. –  thedp Dec 28 '09 at 6:09
    
Understandable. In that case, just call showLoadingImage before you start and hideLoadingImage after you finish. Should be fairly simple. You may need to stick some sort of setTimeout call in to make sure the browser actually renders the new <img> tag though - I've seen a couple of cases where it doesn't bother until the JavaScript has finished executing. –  Samir Talwar Dec 28 '09 at 15:38
    
+1 for ajax load –  Igor Lacik Feb 3 at 12:22
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Jonathon's excellent solution breaks in IE8 (the animation does not show at all). To fix this, change the CSS to:

.modal {
display:    none;
position:   fixed;
z-index:    1000;
top:        0;
left:       0;
height:     100%;
width:      100%;
background: rgba( 255, 255, 255, .8 ) 
            url('http://i.stack.imgur.com/FhHRx.gif') 
            50% 50% 
            no-repeat;
opacity: 0.80;
-ms-filter: progid:DXImageTransform.Microsoft.Alpha(Opacity = 80);
filter: alpha(opacity = 80)};
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Edited because the multiple 'background-' lines didn't work, but the single background statement works correctly. –  Maurice Flanagan Sep 9 '12 at 14:03
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http://jquery.malsup.com/block/#page

This is a jquery plugin which i had used for blocking my screens while i am processing the request on the backend.

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jQuery provides event hooks for when AJAX requests start and end. You can hook into these to show your loader.

For example, create the following div:

<div id="spinner">
  <img src="images/spinner.gif" alt="Loading" />
</div>

Set it to display: none in your stylesheets. You can style it whatever way you want to. You can generate a nice loading image at Ajaxload.info, if you want to.

Then, you can use something like the following to make it be shown automatically when sending Ajax requests:

$(document).ready(function () {

    $('#spinner').bind("ajaxSend", function() {
	    $(this).show();
    }).bind("ajaxComplete", function() {
	    $(this).hide();
    });

});

Simply add this Javascript block to the end of your page before closing your body tag or wherever you see fit.

Now, whenever you send Ajax requests, the #spinner div will be shown. When the request is complete, it'll be hidden again.

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Can someone please explain what AJAX has to do with this? Can't I simply manage this all within the page without accessing the server with AJAX... Or am I missing here something? Thanks. –  thedp Dec 27 '09 at 23:24
2  
Ah - as I understood, you wanted a loading image to be shown whenever you were making AJAX requests. If you simply want a "please wait, loading..." animation to be shown until the page has fully loaded, you could have a loading div in the page and then hide it in your $(document).ready block. –  Veeti Dec 27 '09 at 23:33
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For those requiring an image-free solution, take a look at spin.js. Light-weight and easy to implement. (Credit to F. Gnass)

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that's very interesting, thanks for the link. –  Fred Oct 7 '12 at 10:16
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If you are using Turbolinks With Rails this is my solution:

This is the CoffeeScript

$(window).on 'page:fetch', ->
  $('body').append("<div class='modal'></div>")
  $('body').addClass("loading")

$(window).on 'page:change', ->
  $('body').removeClass("loading")

This is the SASS CSS based on the first excellent answer from Jonathan Sampson

# loader.css.scss

.modal {
    display:    none;
    position:   fixed;
    z-index:    1000;
    top:        0;
    left:       0;
    height:     100%;
    width:      100%;
    background: rgba( 255, 255, 255, 0.4)
            asset-url('ajax-loader.gif', image)
            50% 50% 
            no-repeat;
}
body.loading {
    overflow: hidden;   
}

body.loading .modal {
    display: block;
}
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The showLoading plugin also does this quite well:

http://contextllc.com/tools/jQuery-showLoading

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This is my first preloader. It's very simple. While page is loading, it shows preloader, and then hide preloader and show page. You can add preloading image in preload div. Very simple, just few lines of code. Preload web site using jquery (simple)

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