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I am trying to generate a list containing a mixture of ascending and descending numbers.

e.g., say you have n=5. I want to generate a list/array based on n such that you have:

[0,1,2,3,4,3,2,1,0]

using list comprehension.

I tried doing this:

print [[i+j] for i in range(n)for j in range(n,-1,-1)]

but I can't seem to get it right.

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2  
why wouldnt you just do range(n) + range(n-2,-1,-1) –  Joran Beasley Oct 29 '13 at 2:38
1  
@JoranBeasley or to use n like the op is hoping for: range(n) + range((n-1), -1, -1) –  agconti Oct 29 '13 at 2:40
    
You really don't want to use [... for i in range(X) for j in range(Y)] because you just doubly nested the for loops, so you get X*Y total loops. This will generate too many numbers; you are actually trying to generate 2*n - 1 numbers. –  steveha Oct 29 '13 at 2:52
    
I like range(n)[:-1] + range(n)[::-1] –  wim Oct 29 '13 at 3:02
    
FYI there is a generalised version of this 'triangle window' in the function scipy.signal.triang –  wim Oct 29 '13 at 3:04

3 Answers 3

I know you specified you wanted a list comp, but is it really necessary?

list(range(5)) + list(reversed(range(4)))

(python 3 syntax)

Or, in python2:

range(5) + range(4)[::-1]

or

range(5) + range(3,-1,-1)

I think the first one is more readable, but ymmv.

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In [27]: n = 5

In [28]: [n-1-abs(i-n+1) for i in range(n*2-1)]
Out[28]: [0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 3, 2, 1, 0]

Update

This one might be more clear

In [36]: [n-abs(i) for i in range(-n,n+1)]
Out[36]: [0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1, 0]
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2  
[n - abs(i) - 1 for i in range(1 - n, n)] –  wim Oct 29 '13 at 2:51

One-liner:

[i if i < n else 2*(n-1)-i for i in range(2*(n-1) + 1)]

More efficient:

_top = 2*(n-1)
[i if i < n else _top-i for i in range(_top + 1)]
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