Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have enum that implement MyInterface. While making other class using that enum I want to constrain the enumClz to be class that has implemented MyInterface.

So I describe signature to be "T extends Enum< T extends MyInterface>" at generic type declaration.

public <T extends Enum< T extends MyInterface>> C1( Class<T> enumClz) {
    for (T anEnumConst : enumClz.getEnumConstants()) {
        //....process
    }
}

What surprised me is the IDE say it is "unexpected bound" at "T extends MyInterface". I don't know what it means by such two word error message, Any solution about this?


And by the way, out of curious I have an odd question though not really important. Can an enum type T be equivalent to the following infinite loop

<T extends Enum< T extends Enum<T extends<....>>>> ?

share|improve this question
    
@alfasin extends when used in generic bounds means "is, or extends, or implements". –  Paul Bellora Oct 29 '13 at 4:36
add comment

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Declare the following instead:

public <T extends Enum<T> & MyInterface> C1(Class<T> enumClz)

Here, we're declaring T to have multiple upper bounds, which is possible for type parameters.

The declaration <T extends Enum<T extends MyInterface>> is invalid syntax because T must be bounded with a concrete type, but the T extends MyInterface in the type argument for Enum is trying to add more information about T when it's already been declared.

Note also that a class type must always come first when declaring multiple bounds. A declaration of <T extends MyInterface & Enum<T>> is also invalid syntax.

And by the way, out of curious I have an odd question though not really important. Can an enum type T be equivalent to the following infinite loop

<T extends Enum< T extends Enum<T extends<....>>>> ?

The declaration T extends Enum<T> is already "infinite" in that it's recursive. The same T that is being declared is given as a type argument for its upper bound - a type parameter's scope includes its own declaration.

More information:

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.