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I have a method that looks like it was reordered by the JIT.

public boolean finishRequest(boolean success) {
    if (success) {
        error = false;
        wayPoints.put(FINISH_SUCCESS_WP, System.currentTimeMillis());
    } else {
        wayPoints.put(FINISH_ERROR_WP, System.currentTimeMillis());
        error = true;
    }
    someThread.addToQueue(this);//...submit for further processing on separate thread
    return true;
}

The wayPoints container is a field of "this" which gets accessed by someThread. I ended up getting a ConcurrentModificationException in some line of code within someThread when it iterates through this' wayPoints, via getWayPoints().

To fix this I created a new immutable class that would get passed to someThread instead of "this".

public boolean finishRequest(boolean success) {
    if (success) {
        error = false;
        wayPoints.put(FINISH_SUCCESS_WP, System.currentTimeMillis());
    } else {
        wayPoints.put(FINISH_ERROR_WP, System.currentTimeMillis());
        error = true;
    }
    PLog plog = new PLog(wayPoints.toArray(new WayPoint[wayPoints.size()]));
    someThread.addToQueue(plog);//...submit for further processing on separate thread
    return true;
}

In the first piece of code the JIT can reorder 'someThread.addToQueue()' and 'wayPoints.put()' because from what the compiler could tell wayPoints is not being read from further into the current thread. But in the fixed code, since I am using wayPoints to construct my new PLog instance, have I now effectively prevented the JIT from re-ordering?

Reference.... http://docs.oracle.com/javase/specs/jls/se7/html/jls-17.html#jls-17.4.5

From the reading of section 17.4.5 of the JLS I presume I have created a legally binding happens-before that would prevent re-ordering since I am now reading from wayPoints after writing to it.... "If x and y are actions of the same thread and x comes before y in program order, then hb(x, y)."

thank you!

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2  
It seems like you've done a pretty good job of answering your own question! I can't find fault with anything you've posted, looks good to me –  torquestomp Oct 29 '13 at 4:35

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You are absolutely correct you have created a happens-before relationship. In general

a = X ; ( X is some constant or expression not involving a & b ) b = Y ; ( Y is some constant or expression not involving a & b )

above two can be reordered by the JIT

But a = X ; b = a * Y ;

Will not be reordered. Which is pretty much what you have done in your correction.

Other way to fix your problem would be to declare wayPoints volatile. If you declare wayPoints as volatile, write to volatile ( wayPoints) would not be reordered with other memory operations ( someThread.addToQueue() ) in your original program order.

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Are you sure about that with regards to the volatile? In the JSR-133 Cookbook, Doug Lea shows that it is OK to reorder between two operations where the first is volatile and the second is not.JSR-133 Cookbook I guess it depends on whether the wayPoints.put is a volatile load or store. From the JLS the exact wording for volatile happens-before is "A write to a volatile field (§8.3.1.4) happens-before every subsequent read of that field." –  Jose Martinez Oct 29 '13 at 13:57
1  
Take a look at this article by Brian Goetz ibm.com/developerworks/library/j-jtp03304 It says The JSR 133 Expert Group decided that it would be more sensible for volatile reads and writes not to be reorderable with any other memory operations. –  snegi Oct 29 '13 at 15:33
    
Another thing you can do it use +PrintCompilation flag to print the JIT compiled code –  snegi Oct 29 '13 at 15:44

What do addToQueue and the corresponding "removeFromQueue" do? They will need some sort of synchronization, in which case the exact functioning of method "finishRequest" would not matter. Your rearranged method is no more or less wrong than before, unless of course, "this" is already in the queue before finishRequest runs. If addToQueue is not synchronized with its counterpart, someThread can still see an incompletely constructed PLog.

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The queue is synchronized, I am using a BlockingQueue (LinkedBlockingQueue to be specific). addToQueue basically does some sort of validation check then adds the object to the BlockingQueue. –  Jose Martinez Oct 29 '13 at 14:26
    
Then the behavior you are seeing can only happen if the "this" element is already in the queue, because if you only put it in once, you have a "put in queue" happens before "take from queue" relationship. –  Ringding Oct 29 '13 at 17:46

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