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I understand that unlike TCP, UDP is kinda unreliable. While I am learning the UDP, I try to implement a stop-and-wait flow control protocol. It is an extremely simple communication: a client running on one PC and a server running on another PC. I am trying to transfer my .txt file in packets from the client to the server.

At first, I planned to implement the "error-free" version first, and then add in error probability on purpose and see how the stop and wait mechanism works.

I just finished implementing the error-free version, and astonishingly find that in my so-called "error-free" version, there are actually ACK lost cases!

So even before I manually add in error probability, the ACK gets lost already (strangely it never gets damaged).

Since it is a pretty simple communication, I expect no ACK lost or damage. I wonder if I have implemented it somewhere wrong or it is supposed to be like so?

My Codes

cli.c

#include "headsock.h"

float str_cli(FILE *fp, int sockfd, long *len, struct sockaddr *addr, int addrlen, socklen_t *len_recvfrom); // communication function
void tv_sub(struct timeval *out, struct timeval *in); //calculate the time interval between out and in

int main(int argc, char **argv)
{
    int sockfd;
    float ti, rt;
    long len;
    struct sockaddr_in ser_addr;
    char ** pptr;
    struct hostent *sh;
    struct in_addr **addrs;
    FILE *fp;
    socklen_t len_recvfrom;

    if (argc != 2)
    {
        printf("parameters not match");
        exit(0);
    }

    sh = gethostbyname(argv[1]); // get host's information
    if (sh == NULL) 
    {
        printf("error when gethostby name");
        exit(0);
    }

    addrs = (struct in_addr **)sh->h_addr_list;
    printf("canonical name: %s\n", sh->h_name); // print the remote host's information
    for (pptr=sh->h_aliases; *pptr != NULL; pptr++)
        printf("the aliases name is: %s\n", *pptr);
    switch(sh->h_addrtype)
    {
        case AF_INET: // the address family that is used for the socket you're creating (in this case an Internet Protocol address)
            printf("AF_INET\n");
        break;
        default:
            printf("unknown addrtype\n");
        break;
    }

    sockfd = socket(AF_INET, SOCK_DGRAM, 0); // create the socket
    if (sockfd <0)
    {
        printf("error in socket");
        exit(1);
    }

    ser_addr.sin_family = AF_INET; // address format is host and port number                                              
    ser_addr.sin_port = htons(MYUDP_PORT);
    //copies count characters from the object pointed to by src to the object pointed to by dest
    memcpy(&(ser_addr.sin_addr.s_addr), *addrs, sizeof(struct in_addr));
    bzero(&(ser_addr.sin_zero), 8);

    if((fp = fopen ("s.txt","r+t")) == NULL)
    {
        printf("File doesn't exit\n");
        exit(0);
    }

    // perform the transmission and receiving
    ti = str_cli(fp, sockfd, &len, (struct sockaddr *)&ser_addr, sizeof(struct sockaddr_in), &len_recvfrom);

    rt = ((len-1) / (float)ti); // caculate the average transmission rate
    printf("Time(ms) : %.3f, Data sent(byte): %d\nData rate: %f (Kbytes/s)\n", ti, (int)len-1, rt);

    close(sockfd);
    fclose(fp);
    exit(0);
}

// communication function
float str_cli(FILE *fp, int sockfd, long *len, struct sockaddr *addr, int addrlen, socklen_t *len_recvfrom)
{
    char *buf;
    long lsize, ci;
    struct pack_so packet;
    struct ack_so ack;
    int n;
    float time_inv = 0.0;
    struct timeval sendt, recvt;
    struct timeval sendTime, curTime;
    ci = 0;

    int prev_msg_acked = TRUE;
    int next_packet_num = 0;

    fseek(fp, 0, SEEK_END);
    lsize = ftell (fp);
    rewind(fp);
    printf("The file length is %d bytes\n", (int)lsize);
    printf("The packet length is %d bytes\n", PACKLEN);

    // allocate memory to contain the whole file.
    buf = (char *) malloc(lsize+1);
    if (buf == NULL)
       exit (2);

    // copy the file into the buffer.
    // read lsize data elements, each 1 byte
    fread(buf, 1, lsize, fp);

    // the whole file is loaded in the buffer
    buf[lsize] ='\0'; // append the end byte
    gettimeofday(&sendt, NULL); // get the current time
    while(ci <= lsize)
    {
        if (prev_msg_acked) // only transmits when previous message has been acknowledged
        {
            // form the packet to transmit
            if ((lsize-ci+1) <= PACKLEN) // final string
                packet.len = lsize-ci+1;
            else // send message of length PACKLEN
                packet.len = PACKLEN;
            packet.num = next_packet_num;
            memcpy(packet.data, (buf+ci), packet.len);

            /*************** SEND MESSAGE ***************/
            gettimeofday(&sendTime, NULL);
            if((n = sendto(sockfd, &packet, sizeof(packet), 0, addr, addrlen)) == -1)
            {
                printf("Send error!\n"); // send the data
                exit(1);
            }

            // update the sequence number
            if (packet.num == 1)
                next_packet_num = 0;
            else
                next_packet_num = 1;

            ci += packet.len;

            prev_msg_acked = FALSE;
        }

        /*************** RECEIVE ACK ***************/
        // MSG_DONTWAIT flag, non-blocking
        // receives nothing
        if ((n = recvfrom(sockfd, &ack, sizeof(ack), MSG_DONTWAIT, addr, len_recvfrom)) == -1)
        {
            // monitors how long nothing is received
            gettimeofday(&curTime, NULL);
            // if timeout
            if (curTime.tv_sec - sendTime.tv_sec > TIMEOUT)
            {
                // retransmit
                printf("Timeout! Resend this.\n");
                /*************** RESEND MESSAGE ***************/
                gettimeofday(&sendTime, NULL);
                if((n = sendto(sockfd, &packet, sizeof(packet), 0, addr, addrlen)) == -1)
                {
                    printf("Send error!\n"); // send the data
                    exit(1);
                }
            }
        }

        // An ACK is received
        else
        {
            printf("ACK received. ");
            // if what the server expects next is this one or server receives a different length
            // if ACK is incorrect
            if (ack.num != next_packet_num || ack.len != packet.len)
            {
                printf("Incorrect. Resend this. ");
                printf("(%i %i expected, but %i %i received)\n", next_packet_num, packet.len, ack.num, ack.len);

                /*************** RESEND MESSAGE ***************/
                gettimeofday(&sendTime, NULL);
                if((n = sendto(sockfd, &packet, sizeof(packet), 0, addr, addrlen)) == -1)
                {
                    printf("Send error!\n"); // send the data
                    exit(1);
                }
            }
            // if ACK correct
            else
            {
                printf("Correct. Send next.\n");
                prev_msg_acked = TRUE;
            }
        }
    }

    gettimeofday(&recvt, NULL);
    *len= ci; // get current time
    tv_sub(&recvt, &sendt); // get the whole trans time
    time_inv += (recvt.tv_sec)*1000.0 + (recvt.tv_usec)/1000.0;

    return(time_inv);
}

//calculate the time interval between out and in
void tv_sub(struct  timeval *out, struct timeval *in)
{
    if ((out->tv_usec -= in->tv_usec) <0)
    {
        --out->tv_sec;
        out->tv_usec += 1000000;
    }

    out->tv_sec -= in->tv_sec;
}

ser.c

#include "headsock.h"

void str_ser(int sockfd); // transmitting and receiving function

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    int sockfd;
    struct sockaddr_in my_addr;

    //create socket
    if ((sockfd = socket(AF_INET, SOCK_DGRAM, 0)) == -1) {
        printf("error in socket\n");
        exit(1);
    }

    my_addr.sin_family = AF_INET; // Address family; must be AF_INET
    my_addr.sin_port = htons(MYUDP_PORT); // Internet Protocol (IP) port.
    my_addr.sin_addr.s_addr = INADDR_ANY; // IP address in network byte order. INADDR_ANY is 0.0.0.0 meaning "all the addr"
    // places nbyte null bytes in the string s
    // this function will be used to set all the socket structures with null values
    bzero(&(my_addr.sin_zero), 8);

    // binds the socket to all available interfaces
    if (bind(sockfd, (struct sockaddr *) &my_addr, sizeof(struct sockaddr)) == -1) {
        printf("error in binding\n");
        perror("socket error");
        exit(1);
    }

    // receive and ACK
    str_ser(sockfd);

    close(sockfd);
    exit(0);
}

// transmitting and receiving function
void str_ser(int sockfd)
{   
    FILE *fp;
    char buf[BUFSIZE];
    int end = 0, n = 0;
    long lseek = 0;
    struct ack_so ack;
    struct pack_so packet;

    struct sockaddr_in addr;
    socklen_t len = sizeof(struct sockaddr_in);

    printf("Start receiving...\n");

    srand(time(NULL)); // seed for random number
    uint8_t prev_pkt_seq = 1;

    while(!end)
    {
        /*************** RECEIVE MESSAGE ***************/
        // if error in receiving
        if ((n = recvfrom(sockfd, &packet, sizeof(packet), 0, (struct sockaddr *)&addr, &len)) == -1)
        {
            printf("Error when receiving\n");
            exit(1);
        }

        // if nothing received
        else if (n == 0)
        {
            printf("Nothing received\n");
        }

        // if something received
        else
        {
            // random number 0-99
            // ACK lost
            // send ACK
            if ((rand() % 100) > NO_ACK_RATE)
            {
                // tell sender what to expect next
                if (packet.num == 0)
                    ack.num = 1;
                else
                    ack.num = 0;
                ack.len = packet.len;

                // random number 0-99
                // ACK damaged
                // damage ACK by toggling ACK
                if ((rand() % 100) < WRONG_ACK_RATE)
                {
                    if (ack.num == 0)
                        ack.num = 1;
                    else
                        ack.num = 0;
                    printf("ACK damaged! ");
                }

                /*************** SEND ACK ***************/
                if ((n = sendto(sockfd, &ack, sizeof(ack), 0, (struct sockaddr *)&addr, len)) == -1)
                {
                    printf("ACK send error!\n");
                    exit(1);
                }
                printf("%i %i as ACK sent\n", ack.num, ack.len);
            }
            // does not send ACK
            else
                printf("ACK lost!\n");

            // only save packet if it is not a duplicate
            if (packet.num != prev_pkt_seq)
            {   
                // if the last bit of the received string is the EoF
                if (packet.data[packet.len-1] == '\0')
                {
                    end = 1;
                    packet.len--;
                }

                // copy this packet
                memcpy((buf+lseek), packet.data, packet.len);
                lseek += packet.len;
            }

            // record down previous packet sequence
            prev_pkt_seq = packet.num;
        }
    }

    if ((fp = fopen ("r.txt", "wt")) == NULL)
    {
        printf("File doesn't exit\n");
        exit(0);
    }

    fwrite (buf, 1, lseek, fp); //write data into file
    fclose(fp);
    printf("A file has been successfully received!\nThe total data received is %d bytes\n", (int)lseek);
}

header.h

#include <sys/socket.h>
#include <netinet/in.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <netdb.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <sys/types.h>
#include <unistd.h>
#include <math.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <sys/stat.h>
#include <errno.h>
#include <fcntl.h>
#include <sys/time.h>
#include <time.h>

#define NEWFILE (O_WRONLY|O_CREAT|O_TRUNC)
#define MYTCP_PORT 4950
#define MYUDP_PORT 5350
#define DATALEN 65
#define BUFSIZE 60000

#define PACKLEN 1000
#define NO_ACK_RATE 0 // 10%
#define WRONG_ACK_RATE 0 // 10%
#define TRUE 1
#define FALSE 0
#define TIMEOUT 1

// data packet structure
struct pack_so
{
    uint32_t num; // the sequence number
    uint32_t len; // the packet length
    char data[PACKLEN]; // the packet data
};

struct ack_so
{
    uint8_t num; // the sequence number
    uint32_t len; // the packet length
};
share|improve this question
1  
How on earth are we to guess what you've done (wrong) if you don't show us the code? You've been around SO long enough to know better than that! (Or there again, since you've only been around just over a couple of weeks, maybe you haven't learned yet; 36 questions in 15 days is a lot of questions! Funny, I've asked 36 questions too — in 5 years.) Welcome to Stack Overflow. Please read the About page soon. Yes, 'unreliable' really does mean 'not reliable'. –  Jonathan Leffler Oct 29 '13 at 4:33
    
@JonathanLeffler I am sorry. The reason why I did not post the codes is that sometimes I do that, people get irradiated because they think I want them to debug FOR me. Posted as suggested. –  mavErick Oct 29 '13 at 4:36
2  
That's a tricky area, but programmers are endlessly inventive in finding news ways to do things wrong, and it is almost impossible to guess from a description what's going on. One possibility is that the server isn't ready when the client first sends data. But when the code appears, we can look. Do remember the guidelines for creating an an SSCCE (Short, Self-Contained, Correct Example). –  Jonathan Leffler Oct 29 '13 at 4:39
    
Thanks for the advice! I will remember it next time! :D @JonathanLeffler –  mavErick Oct 29 '13 at 4:40
    
Your code compiles very cleanly. I removed argc and argv from main() in the server since they aren't used and my default compilation options complain about that, but it was the only change I had to make which is unusual. Well done! –  Jonathan Leffler Oct 29 '13 at 4:51

2 Answers 2

I understand that unlike TCP, UDP is kinda unreliable.

It's not that it's 'kinda' unreliable. It's that it has zero reliability features built in. So any packet or fragment loss and the datagram doesn't arrive.

I just finished implementing the error-free version, and astonishingly find that in my so-called "error-free" version, there are actually ACK lost cases!

There are always lost packets in any network. That's how the network protects itself against overload.

So even before I manually add in error probability, the ACK gets lost already (strangely it never gets damaged).

UDP datagrams arrive either entire and intact or not at all. Nothing strange about it.

Since it is a pretty simple communication, I expect no ACK lost or damage.

That's not a reasonable expectation.

I wonder if I have implemented it somewhere wrong or it is supposed to be like so?

Again, it's not that it's 'supposed to be like so': it is that there is nothing to prevent it being so.

Re your code, you can't assume that any time recvfrom() returns -1 it was an EWOULDBLOCK condition. You must check it.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for "you can't assume that any time recvfrom() returns -1 it was an EWOULDBLOCK condition. You must check it." –  Remy Lebeau Oct 29 '13 at 22:13

When you are using UDP, there are absolutely no guarantees that any data will get through. With a simple setup of two computers sharing the same network switch, you would expect that the odds would be very good for the packets to arrive, but there are still no guarantees.

TCP does have guarantees... if a packet is lost, TCP will detect it and re-send the packet.

It will be a real pain to implement your own reliability protocol on top of UDP. The usual use case for UDP is high-redundancy data streaming where low latency is essential; for example, a video conferencing application. Since the goal is to redraw the entire screen dozens of times per second, if part of the screen fails to redraw during one frame, there is no perceivable problem, so video conferencing can be done by just opening a UDP connection and spraying packets of video. But each packet needs to be labeled so that when packets are dropped or arrive out of order, the receiving software can figure out what to do.

Sorry, I can't look at your program tonight, but I wanted to let you know that UDP is not just slightly unreliable; it comes with no guarantees at all.

share|improve this answer
    
That is not to say that you can't implement a ACK system in UDP, though. TFTP, for example, is a UDP-based file transfer protocol that uses ACKs between packets. –  Remy Lebeau Oct 29 '13 at 22:11
    
Of course you can layer an ACK system on top of UDP. UDP is just a transport. I'm just saying it would be more work than simply using TCP when you want a reliable connection. –  steveha Oct 29 '13 at 22:13

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