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the next is my code:

class foo:
    def __init__(self):
        self.a = "a"
    def __getattr__(self,x,defalut):
        if x in self:
            return x
        else:return defalut

a=foo()
print getattr(a,'b','sss')

i know the __getattr__ must be 2 argument,but i want to get a default attribute if the attribute is no being.

how can i get it, thanks


and

i found if defined __setattr__,my next code is also can't run

class foo:
    def __init__(self):
        self.a={}
    def __setattr__(self,name,value):
            self.a[name]=value

a=foo()#error ,why


hi alex, i changed your example:

class foo(object):
    def __init__(self):
        self.a = {'a': 'boh'}
    def __getattr__(self, x):
        if x in self.a:
            return self.a[x]
        raise AttributeError

a=foo()
print getattr(a,'a','sss')

it print {'a': 'boh'},not 'boh' i think it will print self.a not self.a['a'], This is obviously not want to see

why ,and Is there any way to avoid it

share|improve this question
    
Downvoted for not listening to the answers. –  Jonathan Feinberg Dec 27 '09 at 13:14
1  
@zjm, no, there is no way to have getattr(self, 'a', whatever) avoid getting self.a when that's present, nor is it at all obvious why one would want to. Why don't you rename the attribute, say to self.__a, if you want to hide it from the outside? –  Alex Martelli Dec 27 '09 at 15:31

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Your problem number one: you're defining an old-style class (we know you're on Python 2.something, even though you don't tell us, because you're using print as a keyword;-). In Python 2:

class foo:

means you're defining an old-style, aka legacy, class, whose behavior can be rather quirky at times. Never do that -- there's no good reason! The old-style classes exist only for compatibility with old legacy code that relies on their quirks (and were finally abolished in Python 3). Use new style classes instead:

class foo(object):

and then the check if x in self: will not cause a recursive __getattr__ call. It will however cause a failure anyway, because your class does not define a __contains__ method and therefore you cannot check if x is contained in an instance of that class.

If what you're trying to do is whether x is defined in the instance dict of self, don't bother: __getattr__ doesn't even get called in that case -- it's only called when the attribute is not otherwise found in self.

To support three-arguments calls to the getattr built-in, just raise AttributeError in your __getattr__ method if necessary (just as would happen if you had no __getattr__ method at all), and the built-in will do its job (it's the built-in's job to intercept such cases and return the default if provided). That's the reason one never ever calls special methods such as __getattr__ directly but rather uses built-ins and operators which internally call them -- the built-ins and operators provide substantial added value.

So to give an example which makes somewhat sense:

class foo(object):
    def __init__(self):
        self.blah = {'a': 'boh'}
    def __getattr__(self, x):
        if x in self.blah:
            return self.blah[x]
        raise AttributeError

a=foo()
print getattr(a,'b','sss')

This prints sss, as desired.

If you add a __setattr__ method, that one intercepts every attempt to set attributes on self -- including self.blah = whatever. So -- when you need to bypass the very __setattr__ you're defining -- you must use a different approach. For example:

class foo(object):
    def __init__(self):
        self.__dict__['blah'] = {}
    def __setattr__(self, name, value):
        self.blah[name] = value
    def __getattr__(self, x):
        if x in self.blah:
            return self.blah[x]
        raise AttributeError

a=foo()
print getattr(a,'b','sss')

This also prints sss. Instead of

        self.__dict__['blah'] = {}

you could also use

        object.__setattr__(self, 'blah', {})

Such "upcalls to the superclass's implementation" (which you could also obtain via the super built-in) are one of the rare exceptions to the rules "don't call special methods directly, call the built-in or use the operator instead" -- here, you want to specifically bypass the normal behavior, so the explicit special-method call is a possibility.

share|improve this answer
    
hi alex, i changed your example it print {'a': 'boh'},not 'boh' i think it will print self.a not self.a['a'], –  zjm1126 Dec 27 '09 at 7:33

You are confusing the getattr built-in function, which retrieves some attribute binding of an object dynamically (by name), at runtime, and the __getattr__ method, which is invoked when you access some missing attribute of an object.

You can't ask

if x in self:

from within __getattr__, because the in operator will cause __getattr__ to be invoked, leading to infinite recursion.

If you simply want to have undefined attributes all be defined as some value, then

def __getattr__(self, ignored):
    return "Bob Dobbs"
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