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Update: The story is off-topic and the title misleading. The problem is caused by corrupted data set, not cursors, or MongoDB itself. But I would rather like to leave this thread here than to delete it, for that it might help other desperate people.

=== Original story starts here ===

It all starts here: MongoDB: cannot use a cursor to iterate through all the data

I was trying to iterate through a cursor in Java, and it fails because my collection has too many records(~250M). I tried to allocate a new cursor and use cursor.skip to jump back in when the cursor gets timed out but cursor.skip itself times out.

@mnemosyn pointed out the right way for me: break the job into two stages: In the first stage, use a projected cursor to pull only the monotonic _id's of the records. Record the _id's, and then store it somewhere else as "checkpoints". During the second stage, I can then access any chunk of records as a checkpoint recorded.

So I wrote a javascript like this:

db=connect("localhost/twitter");

db.jobScheduler.drop();

for(var i = 0;i<16;++i)
{
    db.jobScheduler.save({_id:"s"+i,jobs:[]});
}

var c = db.tweets.find({},{_id:1}).sort({_id:1});

var totalCount = c.count();

var currentBatchSize = 0;
var currentNum = 0;

var currentShard = 0;
var startTid = 0;
var endTid = 0;
var currentTid = 0;

while(true)
{
    while(c.hasNext())
    {
        var doc = c.next()
        currentTid = doc._id;
        if(currentBatchSize == 0)
        {
            startTid = doc._id;
        }
        ++currentNum;
        ++currentBatchSize;
        if(currentBatchSize == 50000)
        {
            currentBatchSize = 0;
            endTid = doc._id;
            db.jobScheduler.update(
                {_id:"s"+currentShard},
                {$push:{jobs:[startTid,endTid]}});
            currentShard = (currentShard+1)%16;
            print(currentNum+"/"+totalCount+"("+currentNum*100/totalCount+"%)");
            print("["+startTid+","+endTid+"]");
        }
    }
    if(currentNum != totalCount){
        var c = db.tweets.find({_id:{$gt:currentTid}},{_id:1}).sort({_id:1});
        print("Cursor resetted....");
    }else
        break;
}
if(currentBatchSize != 0)
{
    currentBatchSize = 0;
    endTid = doc._id;
    db.jobScheduler.update(
        {_id:"s"+currentShard},
        {$push:{jobs:[startTid,endTid]}});
    currentShard = (currentShard+1)%16;
}

Considering that simply pulling _id only would still result in timeout, I added a guard like this:

if(currentNum != totalCount){
    var c = db.tweets.find({_id:{$gt:currentTid}},{_id:1}).sort({_id:1});
    print("Cursor resetted....");
}else
    break;

because when the cursor times out, I don't get an exception but a false cursor.hasNext(). Since I already recorded currentTid when iterating through them, using the range query var c = db.tweets.find({_id:{$gt:currentTid}},{_id:1}).sort({_id:1}); will put me back in position, theoretically. However the poor little program end up like this:

[337242463750201340,345999466677010400]
21800000/253531208(8.598546968624076%)
[345999469818544100,346244305876295700]
Cursor resetted....
Cursor resetted....
Cursor resetted....

It seems to be stuck at the first occurrence of cursor timeout, forever. And the range query is not bringing me back.

Now I'm really confused. Iteration doesn't work. cursor.skip() doesn't work. Range query doesn't work. And what really works with MongoDB? Or is there something I'm doing really wrong?

Any help would be much appreciated!

Update:

I had some discussion with @AsyaKamsky, he helped me to discover the following things:

  1. setting cursor.batchSize() to 10 doesn't work.
  2. The behaviour is not caused by an idle cursor waiting for 10 minutes. The cursor is pulling data rapidly from server, but still gets invalidated.
  3. The real problem is that after it gets invalid in this way, I could never reallocate any usable cursors anymore. All the new cursors refuse to give me data. There is one possible workaround: close the cursor before this happens, and re-allocate one and use range query to jump back.

Experiments ongoing. Updating this thread in real-time :-)

Update: Failed! I tried renewing cursor after reading 50k records every time. It also gets trapped at this magical index 21800000! That's very close to my cursor.skip() failure offset!

Update:

Confirmed the guessing:

c = db.tweets.find().skip(21800000); //works
c = db.tweets.find().skip(21850000); //doesn't work

I'll try binary search on this range to find the magic number.

Update:

Ok... Magic number found.

db.tweets.find().itcount() ->21837006

db.tweets.find().count() ->253531208

Now what? This is really bad.

share|improve this question
    
are you sure it's not just done? you are looking for equality of totalCount (as it was when you started) and currentNum so if even a single document was inserted since you started, currentNum will blow right past totalNum without triggering the break and now you're forever querying for data that returns empty set. Maybe change your condition to ">" from "!=" oh and see my note on the other question - I don't see why you need to do this - you should be manipulating the batchSize instead to make sure the cursor doesn't time out while you're working on a single batch. –  Asya Kamsky Oct 29 '13 at 5:34
    
@AsyaKamsky Please note the output: 21800000/253531208(8.598546968624076%). This indicates that I still have a lot of them to process. Nobody else touches the database. (It's setup not for production by purely for my experiments) Also, consider 21800000 > 253531208, or 21800000 != 253531208. :-) –  Yadli Oct 29 '13 at 5:40
2  
you push something new to an array every 50K documents and you only have 16 documents/arrays you are updating. Ergo you are making 5000 updates/pushes to 16 arrays. That's still over 300 updates and each one pushes a range (low and high boundry). –  Asya Kamsky Oct 29 '13 at 5:50
2  
try replacing update(...) with insert({queue:"s"+N, boundries:[start,end]}) and see if it gets a lot faster... –  Asya Kamsky Oct 29 '13 at 5:52
1  
Confirmed. It's corrupted data, not myth about cursors... After rebuilding the collection it seems to be fine now. –  Yadli Oct 30 '13 at 2:47

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