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What's the best/most efficient way to extract text set between parenthesis? Say I wanted to get the string "text" from the string "ignore everything except this (text)" in the most efficient manner possible.

So far, the best I've come up with is this:

$fullString = "ignore everything except this (text)";
$start = strpos('(', $fullString);
$end = strlen($fullString) - strpos(')', $fullString);

$shortString = substr($fullString, $start, $end);

Is there a better way to do this? I know in general using regex tends to be less efficient, but unless I can reduce the number of function calls, perhaps this would be the best approach? Thoughts?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 42 down vote accepted

i'd just do a regex and get it over with. unless you are doing enough iterations that it becomes a huge performance issue, it's just easier to code (and understand when you look back on it)

$text = 'ignore everything except this (text)';
preg_match('#\((.*?)\)#', $text, $match);
print $match[1];
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Isn't *? redundant? –  Dimitry Oct 13 '08 at 2:18
    
No, it isn't: . only matches a single character. –  Edward Z. Yang Oct 13 '08 at 2:18
1  
not necessarily, ? is a lazy match. without it, a string like 'ignore (everything) except this (text)', the match would end up being 'everthing) except this (text' –  Owen Oct 13 '08 at 2:19
    
Good to know. Should avoid all those squared nots. E.g. /src="([^"]*)"/ now replaced with /src="(.*?)"/ :D –  Dimitry Oct 13 '08 at 2:24
1  
the /src="([^"]*)"/ is more efficient than /src="(.*?)"/ –  Tanj Oct 13 '08 at 2:41

So, actually, the code you posted doesn't work: substr()'s parameters are $string, $start and $length, and strpos()'s parameters are $haystack, $needle. Slightly modified:

$str = "ignore everything except this (text)";
$start  = strpos($str, '(');
$end    = strpos($str, ')', $start + 1);
$length = $end - $start;
$result = substr($str, $start + 1, $length - 1);

Some subtleties: I used $start + 1 in the offset parameter in order to help PHP out while doing the strpos() search on the second parenthesis; we increment $start one and reduce $length to exclude the parentheses from the match.

Also, there's no error checking in this code: you'll want to make sure $start and $end do not === false before performing the substr.

As for using strpos/substr versus regex; performance-wise, this code will beat a regular expression hands down. It's a little wordier though. I eat and breathe strpos/substr, so I don't mind this too much, but someone else may prefer the compactness of a regex.

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Use a regular expression:

if( preg_match( '!\(([^\)]+)\)!', $text, $match ) )
    $text = $match[1];
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This is a sample code to extract all the text between '[' and ']' and store it 2 separate arrays(ie text inside parentheses in one array and text outside parentheses in another array)

   function extract_text($string)
   {
    $text_outside=array();
    $text_inside=array();
    $t="";
    for($i=0;$i<strlen($string);$i++)
    {
        if($string[$i]=='[')
        {
            $text_outside[]=$t;
            $t="";
            $t1="";
            $i++;
            while($string[$i]!=']')
            {
                $t1.=$string[$i];
                $i++;
            }
            $text_inside[] = $t1;

        }
        else {
            if($string[$i]!=']')
            $t.=$string[$i];
            else {
                continue;
            }

        }
    }
    if($t!="")
    $text_outside[]=$t;

    var_dump($text_outside);
    echo "\n\n";
    var_dump($text_inside);
  }

Output: extract_text("hello how are you?"); will produce:

array(1) {
  [0]=>
  string(18) "hello how are you?"
}

array(0) {
}

extract_text("hello [http://www.google.com/test.mp3] how are you?"); will produce

array(2) {
  [0]=>
  string(6) "hello "
  [1]=>
  string(13) " how are you?"
}


array(1) {
  [0]=>
  string(30) "http://www.google.com/test.mp3"
}
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+1 but how do the same for [* and *] ? Because [] only maybe used on html for example. –  Mike Sep 3 '14 at 21:12

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