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I have a Core Data model with an NSDate property. I want to filter the database by day. I assume the solution will involve an NSPredicate, but I'm not sure how to put it all together.

I know how to compare the day of two NSDates using NSDateComponents and NSCalendar, but how do I filter it with an NSPredicate?

Perhaps I need to create a category on my NSManagedObject subclass that can return a bare date with just the year, month and day. Then I could compare that in an NSPredicate. Is this your recommendation, or is there something simpler?

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up vote 149 down vote accepted

Given a NSDate * startDate and endDate and a NSManagedObjectContext * moc:

NSPredicate *predicate = [NSPredicate predicateWithFormat:@"(date >= %@) AND (date <= %@)", startDate, endDate];
NSFetchRequest *request = [[[NSFetchRequest alloc] init] autorelease];
[request setEntity:[NSEntityDescription entityForName:@"EntityName" inManagedObjectContext:moc]];
[request setPredicate:predicate];

NSError *error = nil;
NSArray *results = [moc executeFetchRequest:request error:&error];
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2  
what if we have only one date? – Wasim Sep 14 '11 at 9:55
2  
Looks like you can use ==. Though if you're searching by day, remember that NSDate is a date-and-time -- you might want to use a midnight-to-midnight range. – jlstrecker Oct 17 '11 at 15:45
1  
Example on how to also setup startDate and endDate, see my answer below – d.ennis Nov 13 '11 at 22:13
    
@jlstrecker can u show me an example how to use a midnight to midnight range. for example: i have 2 same days but different timing. and i want to filter by day(i dont care about the timing). How can i do that? – Enkidu Sep 7 '12 at 13:47
3  
@Shady In the above example, you could set startDate to 2012-09-17 0:00:00 and endDate to 2012-09-18 0:00:00 and the predicate to startDate <= date < endDate. That would catch all times on 2012-09-17. – jlstrecker Sep 17 '12 at 23:34

I ported the answer from Glauco Neves to Swift 2.0 and wrapped it inside a function that receives a date and returns the NSPredicate for the corresponding day:

func predicateForDayFromDate(date: NSDate) -> NSPredicate {
    let calendar = NSCalendar(calendarIdentifier: NSCalendarIdentifierGregorian)
    let components = calendar!.components([.Year, .Month, .Day, .Hour, .Minute, .Second], fromDate: date)
    components.hour = 00
    components.minute = 00
    components.second = 00
    let startDate = calendar!.dateFromComponents(components)
    components.hour = 23
    components.minute = 59
    components.second = 59
    let endDate = calendar!.dateFromComponents(components)

    return NSPredicate(format: "day >= %@ AND day =< %@", argumentArray: [startDate!, endDate!])
}
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For me this is worked.

NSCalendar *calendar = [NSCalendar currentCalendar];
    NSDateComponents *components = [calendar components:(NSYearCalendarUnit | NSMonthCalendarUnit ) fromDate:[NSDate date]];
    //create a date with these components
    NSDate *startDate = [calendar dateFromComponents:components];
    [components setMonth:0];
    [components setDay:0]; //reset the other components
    [components setYear:0]; //reset the other components
    NSDate *endDate = [calendar dateByAddingComponents:components toDate:startDate options:0];

    startDate = [NSDate date];
    endDate = [startDate dateByAddingTimeInterval:-(7 * 24 * 60 * 60)];//change here

    NSString *startTimeStamp = [[NSNumber numberWithInt:floor([endDate timeIntervalSince1970])] stringValue];
    NSString *endTimeStamp = [[NSNumber numberWithInt:floor([startDate timeIntervalSince1970])] stringValue];


   NSPredicate *predicate = [NSPredicate predicateWithFormat:@"((paidDate1 >= %@) AND (paidDate1 < %@))",startTimeStamp,endTimeStamp];
    NSLog(@"predicate is %@",predicate);
    totalArr = [completeArray filteredArrayUsingPredicate:predicate];
    [self filterAndPopulateDataBasedonIndex];
    [self.tableviewObj reloadData];
    NSLog(@"result is %@",totalArr);

I have filtered array from current date to 7 days back. I mean I am getting one week data from current date. This should work.

Note: I am converting date which is coming with milli seconds by 1000, and comparing after. Let me know if you need any clarity.

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In Swift I got something similar to:

        let dateFormatter = NSDateFormatter()
        dateFormatter.dateFormat = "yyyy-MM-dd"
        let date = dateFormatter.dateFromString(predicate)
        let calendar = NSCalendar(calendarIdentifier: NSGregorianCalendar)
        let components = calendar!.components(
            NSCalendarUnit.CalendarUnitYear |
                NSCalendarUnit.CalendarUnitMonth |
                NSCalendarUnit.CalendarUnitDay |
                NSCalendarUnit.CalendarUnitHour |
                NSCalendarUnit.CalendarUnitMinute |
                NSCalendarUnit.CalendarUnitSecond, fromDate: date!)
        components.hour = 00
        components.minute = 00
        components.second = 00
        let startDate = calendar!.dateFromComponents(components)
        components.hour = 23
        components.minute = 59
        components.second = 59
        let endDate = calendar!.dateFromComponents(components)
        predicate = NSPredicate(format: "day >= %@ AND day =< %@", argumentArray: [startDate!, endDate!])

I had a hard time to discover that string interpolation "\(this notation)" doesn't work for comparing dates in NSPredicate.

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Example on how to also set up startDate and endDate to the above given answer:

...

NSCalendar *calendar = [NSCalendar currentCalendar];
NSDateComponents *components = [calendar components:(NSYearCalendarUnit | NSMonthCalendarUnit ) fromDate:[NSDate date]];
//create a date with these components
NSDate *startDate = [calendar dateFromComponents:components];
[components setMonth:1];
[components setDay:0]; //reset the other components
[components setYear:0]; //reset the other components
NSDate *endDate = [calendar dateByAddingComponents:components toDate:startDate options:0];
predicate = [NSPredicate predicateWithFormat:@"((date >= %@) AND (date < %@)) || (date = nil)",startDate,endDate];

...

Here I was searching for all entries within one month. It's worth to mention, that this example also shows how to search 'nil' date-entires.

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Saved my Day :) – Xeieshan May 1 '14 at 11:59

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