Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am creating a site similar to reddit and hacker news that has a database of links and votes. I am implementing hacker news' popularity algorithm and things are going pretty swimmingly until it comes to actually gathering up these links and displaying them. The algorithm is simple:

Y Combinator's Hacker News:
Popularity = (p - 1) / (t + 2)^1.5`

Votes divided by age factor.
Where`

p : votes (points) from users.
t : time since submission in hours.

p is subtracted by 1 to negate submitter's vote.
Age factor is (time since submission in hours plus two) to the power of 1.5.factor is (time since submission in hours plus two) to the power of 1.5.

I asked a very similar question over yonder http://stackoverflow.com/questions/1964395/complex-ordering-in-django but instead of contemplating my options I choose one and tried to make it work because that's how I did it with PHP/MySQL but I now know Django does things a lot differently.

My models look something (exactly) like this

class Link(models.Model):
category = models.ForeignKey(Category)
user = models.ForeignKey(User)
created = models.DateTimeField(auto_now_add = True)
modified = models.DateTimeField(auto_now = True)
fame = models.PositiveIntegerField(default = 1)
title = models.CharField(max_length = 256)
url = models.URLField(max_length = 2048)

def __unicode__(self):
    return self.title

class Vote(models.Model):
link = models.ForeignKey(Link)
user = models.ForeignKey(User)
created = models.DateTimeField(auto_now_add = True)
modified = models.DateTimeField(auto_now = True)
karma_delta = models.SmallIntegerField()

def __unicode__(self):
    return str(self.karma_delta)

and my view:

def index(request):
popular_links = Link.objects.select_related().annotate(karma_total = Sum('vote__karma_delta'))
return render_to_response('links/index.html', {'links': popular_links})

Now from my previous question, I am trying to implement the algorithm using the sorting function. An answer from that question seems to think I should put the algorithm in the select and sort then. I am going to paginate these results so I don't think I can do the sorting in python without grabbing everything. Any suggestions on how I could efficiently do this?

EDIT

This isn't working yet but I think it's a step in the right direction:

from django.shortcuts import render_to_response
from linkett.apps.links.models import *

def index(request):
popular_links = Link.objects.select_related()
popular_links = popular_links.extra(
    select = {
        'karma_total': 'SUM(vote.karma_delta)',
        'popularity': '(karma_total - 1) / POW(2, 1.5)',
    },
    order_by = ['-popularity']
)
return render_to_response('links/index.html', {'links': popular_links})

This errors out into:

Caught an exception while rendering: column "karma_total" does not exist
LINE 1: SELECT ((karma_total - 1) / POW(2, 1.5)) AS "popularity", (S...

EDIT 2

Better error?

TemplateSyntaxError: Caught an exception while rendering: missing FROM-clause entry for table "vote"
LINE 1: SELECT ((vote.karma_total - 1) / POW(2, 1.5)) AS "popularity...

My index.html is simply:

{% block content %}

{% for link in links %}
 
  
   karma-up
   {{ link.karma_total }}
   karma-down
  
  {{ link.title }}
  Posted by {{ link.user }} to {{ link.category }} at {{ link.created }}

{% empty %} No Links {% endfor %} {% endblock content %}

EDIT 3 So very close! Again, all these answers are great but I am concentrating on a particular one because I feel it works best for my situation.

from django.db.models import Sum
from django.shortcuts import render_to_response
from linkett.apps.links.models import *

def index(request): popular_links = Link.objects.select_related().extra( select = { 'popularity': '(SUM(links_vote.karma_delta) - 1) / POW(2, 1.5)', }, tables = ['links_link', 'links_vote'], order_by = ['-popularity'], ) return render_to_response('links/test.html', {'links': popular_links})

Running this I am presented with an error hating on my lack of group by values. Specifically:

TemplateSyntaxError at /
Caught an exception while rendering: column "links_link.id" must appear in the GROUP BY clause or be used in an aggregate function
LINE 1: ...karma_delta) - 1) / POW(2, 1.5)) AS "popularity", "links_lin...

Not sure why my links_link.id wouldn't be in my group by but I am not sure how to alter my group by, django usually does that.

share|improve this question
    
Hmm, ate up mah HTML. Ah well, least of my worries. –  TheLizardKing Dec 29 '09 at 18:57

4 Answers 4

up vote 8 down vote accepted

On Hacker News, only the 210 newest stories and 210 most popular stories are paginated (7 pages worth * 30 stories each). My guess is that the reason for the limit (at least in part) is this problem.

Why not drop all the fancy SQL for the most popular stories and just keep a running list instead? Once you've established a list of the top 210 stories you only need to worry about reordering when a new vote comes in since relative order is maintained over time. And when a new vote does come in, you only need to worry about reordering the story that received the vote.

If the story that received the vote is not on the list, calculate the score of that story, plus the least popular story that is on the list. If the story that received the vote is lower, you're done. If it's higher, calculate the current score for the second-to-least most popular (story 209) and compare again. Continue working up until you find a story with a higher score and then place the newly-voted-upon story right below that one in the rankings. Unless, of course, it reaches #1.

The benefit of this approach is that it limits the set of stories you have to look at to figure out the top stories list. In the absolute worst case scenario, you have to calculate the ranking for 211 stories. So it's very efficient unless you have to establish the list from an existing data set - but that's just a one-time penalty assuming you cache the list someplace.

Downvotes are another issue, but I can only upvote (at my karma level, anyway).

share|improve this answer
    
That's a pretty nifty idea. I never expect this site to get very large so there would have to be some major tweaking of those numbers but I like where it's going. –  TheLizardKing Dec 27 '09 at 9:05
    
A few months late but i'm back at it. You wouldn't mind elaborating on this further would you? How would you keep track of your running list? Another database table? Would it be calculated on the fly on every Http Request? Don't worry about the downvotes, I've come to the conclusion that downvoting is a bad idea in most cases. buildingreputation.com has some great reads. –  TheLizardKing May 8 '10 at 7:00
popular_links = Link.objects.select_related()
popular_links = popular_links.extra(
    select = {
        'karma_total': 'SUM(vote.karma_delta)',
        'popularity': '(karma_total - 1) / POW(2, 1.5)'
    },
    order_by = ['-popularity']
)

Or select some sane number, sort the selection using python in any way you like, and cache if its going to be static for all users which it looks like it will - set cache expiration to a minute or so.

But the extra will work better for paginated results in a highly dynamic setup.

share|improve this answer
    
I really think this is what I am going for although for some reason I am continually get the same damn error of: Caught an exception while rendering: column "karma_total" does not exist LINE 1: SELECT ((karma_total - 1) / POW(2, 1.5)) AS "popularity", (S... Which is strange because I thought karma_total was already defined just a line above it! –  TheLizardKing Dec 27 '09 at 9:07
2  
well just substitute it then if you dont need it in the final result: 'popularity': '(SUM(vote.karma_delta) - 1) / POW(2, 1.5)' –  kibitzer Dec 27 '09 at 12:15
    
Man, this is the particular answer I wish would work the most. The other answers are great but I want this one to work. Caught an exception while rendering: missing FROM-clause entry for table "vote" LINE 1: SELECT ((vote.karma_total - 1) / POW(2, 1.5)) AS "popularity... Is my latest error. This wouldn't have anything to do with my usage of 1.1.1 instead of the development version would it? –  TheLizardKing Dec 29 '09 at 18:36
    
your vote table is not added to the query by select_related; you can manually add it by modifying extra and adding tables = ['vote'] if your votes table is called vote –  kibitzer Dec 30 '09 at 8:04
    
View my edit 3 code. I am getting so close I can taste it! I am getting an error referring to the fact that I do not have the appropriate values in my group by. Not sure how to add them considering django usually took care of that. –  TheLizardKing Dec 31 '09 at 1:10

Seems like you could overload the save of the Vote class and have it update the corresponding Link object. Something like this should work well:

from datetime import datetime, timedelta

class Link(models.Model):
 category = models.ForeignKey(Category)
 user = models.ForeignKey(User)
 created = models.DateTimeField(auto_now_add = True)
 modified = models.DateTimeField(auto_now = True)
 fame = models.PositiveIntegerField(default = 1)
 title = models.CharField(max_length = 256)
 url = models.URLField(max_length = 2048)

 #a field to keep the most recently calculated popularity
 popularity = models.FloatField(default = None)

 def CalculatePopularity(self):
  """
  Add a shorcut to make life easier ... this is used by the overloaded save() method and 
  can be used in a management function to do a mass-update periodically
  """
  ts = datetime.now()-self.created
  th = ts.seconds/60/60
  self.popularity = (self.user_set.count()-1)/((th+2)**1.5)

 def save(self, *args, **kwargs):
  """
  Modify the save function to calculate the popularity
  """
  self.CalculatePopularity()
  super(Link, self).save(*args, **kwargs)


 def __unicode__(self):
     return self.title

class Vote(models.Model):
 link = models.ForeignKey(Link)
 user = models.ForeignKey(User)
 created = models.DateTimeField(auto_now_add = True)
 modified = models.DateTimeField(auto_now = True)
 karma_delta = models.SmallIntegerField()

 def save(self, *args, **kwargs):
  """
  Modify the save function to calculate the popularity of the Link object
  """
  self.link.CalculatePopularity()
  super(Vote, self).save(*args, **kwargs)

 def __unicode__(self):
     return str(self.karma_delta)

This way every time you call a link_o.save() or vote_o.save() it will re-calculate the popularity. You have to be a little careful because when you call Link.objects.all().update('updating something') then it won't call our overloaded save() function. So when I use this sort of thing I create a management command which updates all of the objects so they're not too out of date. Something like this will work wonderfully:

from itertools import imap
imap(lambda x:x.CalculatePopularity(), Link.objects.all().select_related().iterator())

This way it will only load a single Link object into memory at once ... so if you have a giant database it won't cause a memory error.

Now to do your ranking all you have to do is:

Link.objects.all().order_by('-popularity')

It will be super-fast since all of you Link items have already calculated the popularity.

share|improve this answer
    
Does this mean that everytime a link is voted on, every single link row is updated? –  TheLizardKing Dec 29 '09 at 16:11
    
no ... it would only update the link that was voted on ... so it wouldn't be that processor intensive –  JudoWill Dec 29 '09 at 20:43

Here was the final answer to my question although many months late and not exactly what I had in mind. Hopefully it will be useful to some.

def hot(request):
    links = Link.objects.select_related().annotate(votes=Count('vote')).order_by('-created')[:150]
    for link in links:
        delta_in_hours = (int(datetime.now().strftime("%s")) - int(link.created.strftime("%s"))) / 3600
        link.popularity = ((link.votes - 1) / (delta_in_hours + 2)**1.5)

    links = sorted(links, key=lambda x: x.popularity, reverse=True)

    links = paginate(request, links, 5)

    return direct_to_template(
        request,
        template = 'links/link_list.html',
        extra_context = {
            'links': links
        })

What's going on here is I pull the latest 150 submissions (5 pages of 30 links each) if you need more obviously you can go grab'em by altering my slice [:150]. This way I don't have to iterate over my queryset which might eventually become very large and really 150 links should be enough procrastination for anybody.

I then calculate the difference in time between now and when the link was created and turn it into hours (not nearly as easy as I thought)

Apply the algorithm to a non-existant field (I like this method because I don't have to store the value in my database and isn't reliant on surrounding links.

The line immediately after the for loop was where I also had another bit of trouble. I can't order_by('popularity') because it's not a real field in my database and is calculated on the fly so I have to convert my queryset into an object list and sort popularity from there.

The next line is just my paginator shortcut, thankfully pagination does not require a queryset unlike some generic views (talking to you object_list).

Spit everything out into a nice direct_to_template generic view and be on my merry way.

share|improve this answer
1  
As a sidenote, there is an easier way to calculate delta_in_hours using datetime.timedelta: (datetime.now() - link.created).total_seconds() / 3600 –  Dick Feb 10 '12 at 6:25

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.