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There is a problem to name property and type. Example:

public class A
{
    public class B { ... }
    public B B; // << error
}

Question 1: Why error?

I could solve it like this

public class A
{
    public B B;
}
public class B { ... } // move it outside

or like this

public class A
{
    public class B { ... }
    public B BB; // rename property
}

or even

public class A
{
    public class BB { ... } // rename type
    public BB B;
}

Question 2: How would you do it?


Moving type declaration outside is risky, because there could be several classes what semantically need same name for the type -> conflict -> strange names for some classes types or necessity to put classes inside namespaces.

Renaming it.. tricky. To example, renaming Shape type, which has to be declared for several classes drawing figures: FigureLine, FigurePoint, etc. I could call them ShapeLine, ShapePoint and so on. Or I could rename type Shape to be something like

public class FigureLine
{
    public enum LineShape {Straight, Bend, Whatever};
    public LineShape Shape {get; private set;}
}

but now if I try to use it, then it become FigureLine.LineShape - that double Line is not nice.

Renaming property... How?

share|improve this question
up vote 2 down vote accepted

1 - Solve it by moving it outside. I'd recommend following the principle that all non-private types should be in their own source file.

2 - I'm less clear what the problem is here, even by moving the enum to its own file, I'd stick with your names:

public enum LineShape {Straight, Bend, Whatever};

public class FigureLine
{
    public LineShape Shape {get; private set;}
}

LineShapeis a better name than just Shape as it better describes what the enum is for (defining line styles, rather than eg 2D or 3D shapes).

share|improve this answer
    
Simply.. amazing. Thanks, this solves all issues (naming is nice, there will be no conflicts, there is no duplicating Line when referencing either property or type)! – Sinatr Oct 29 '13 at 10:47
    
To summarize - solution is to move the type outside and to rename it (to be more bound to related class). – Sinatr Oct 29 '13 at 10:47

Question 1: Why error?

You've got two members both called B within the same class. (A type is a member too.) You can't do that, aside from method overloading.

From section 10.3 of the C# spec:

  • The names of constants, fields, properties, events, or types must differ from the names of all other members declared in the same class.

Next:

Question 2: How would you do it?

If you want the class to be public, I'd probably make it a top-level class instead.

share|improve this answer
    
Why they must differ? Someone said "let it be so" or are there reasons behind? What is "aside from method overloading"? Can I overload something to have public Shape Shape {get; set;} with Shape declaration inside class? – Sinatr Oct 29 '13 at 10:30
    
It makes sense when you think about it. If I say A.B, would I mean B the type or B the property? Just my preference, but I do not like nested classes anyways. I would much prefer to use a unique namespace to keep the related classes in their own "sandbox". – James R. Oct 29 '13 at 10:50
    
@Sinatr: No, you can't do that as it's a property, so it would still violate the constraint I listed. As for why it's the case - I suspect it makes all kinds of things simpler.# – Jon Skeet Oct 29 '13 at 11:31
    
@JamesR., I don't really care how hard is it for compiler/intellisence to get things right. I only care about myself ^^. While A.B seems confusing at first, there are still many ways to understand what exactly it means. Maybe example of when things really get "confusing" even for myself would be sufficient. Otherwise I am prone to think, what it's a bug =D – Sinatr Oct 29 '13 at 14:10
1  
@Sinatr: It's clearly not a bug - it's working according to the specification. You may think it was a poor design decision, but then I'd just disagree in general. Having a particular name mean exactly one thing is a useful property, IMO. – Jon Skeet Oct 29 '13 at 14:13

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