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I am in progress to learn Python. Hopefully someone points me to correct way.
This is what I'd like to do below:

def decorate(function):
    def wrap_function(*args, **kwargs):
        str = 'Hello!'  # This is what I want
        return function(*args, **kwargs)
    return wrap_function

@decorate
def print_message():
    # I'd like to pass 'str' as mentioned above
    # to any functions' argument like below:
    print(str)  # 'str' is same as above

Any idea? Thanks in advance.

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oops. thanks abyx. –  Japboy Dec 27 '09 at 12:17

2 Answers 2

up vote 14 down vote accepted

You can't pass it as its own name, but you can add it to the keywords.

def decorate(function):
    def wrap_function(*args, **kwargs):
        kwargs['str'] = 'Hello!'
        return function(*args, **kwargs)
    return wrap_function

@decorate
def print_message(*args, **kwargs):
    print(kwargs['str'])

Alternatively you can name its own argument:

def decorate(function):
    def wrap_function(*args, **kwargs):
        str = 'Hello!'
        return function(str, *args, **kwargs)
    return wrap_function

@decorate
def print_message(str, *args, **kwargs):
    print(str)

Class method:

def decorate(function):
    def wrap_function(*args, **kwargs):
        str = 'Hello!'
        args.insert(1, str)
        return function(*args, **kwargs)
    return wrap_function

class Printer:
    @decorate
    def print_message(self, str, *args, **kwargs):
        print(str)
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3  
Note that the first solution is also achieved by using functools.partial() (but from version 2.6 only). The same module also offers the wraps() function which can be used with decorators to maintain the name and the doc of the original function. –  RedGlyph Dec 27 '09 at 10:24
    
@RedGlyph: why using functools.partial() from version 2.6 only? the documentation say nothing about it except that functools module is new in pyhton 2.5. –  mg. Dec 27 '09 at 10:49
    
Thanks to Tor Valamo. Alternative solution is clear for me. But how about if the decorated function is an instance method? The instance method's argument should be something like: def print_message(str, self, *args, **kwargs): Is this correct? Thanks again. –  Japboy Dec 27 '09 at 11:41
1  
yes, that's because the args list contains 'self' as the first item. you can fix it with args.insert(1, str) and then return function(*args, **kwargs) –  Tor Valamo Dec 27 '09 at 12:17
1  
@Japboy: i don't know if you noticed but print_message don't need extra *args and **kwargs arguments so don't declare so you function if you don't need it. imho a decorator is more powerful the more the decorated function is unaware of it –  mg. Dec 27 '09 at 15:00

If you want the argument to be "optionally-injected", only in case the function actually takes it, use something like this:

import inspect

def decorate(func):
    def wrap_and_call(*args, **kwargs):
        if 'str' in inspect.getargspec(func).args:
            kwargs['str'] = 'Hello!'
        return func(*args, **kwargs)
    return wrap_and_call
return decorate

@decorate
def func1(str):
    print "Works! - " + str

@decorate
def func2():
    print "Should work, also."
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