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I am trying to implement a mathematical formula in Python and I am quite the beginner at this so please work with me.

I have two 3-column tab-separated files:

For example: inputA:

abandonment-n about-bring-v 32.5890
abandonment-n about-complaint-n 5.5112
abandonment-n about-concern-n 10.6714
abandonment-n among-1-crowd-n 11.4496

inputB:

aardvark-n about-fact-n 7.4328
aardvark-n about-information-n 6.5145
aardvark-n about-know-v 6.4239
aardvark-n among-1-crowd-n 9.9085

inputB:

The formula that I am trying to implement should consider both files as input.

Mathematically, the formula is the following:

Similarity Measure as described in this paper

where, f = feature, Fx= feature vector, w = weight of feature.

This is what I have came up with so far:

Importing both inputs as dict, where [feature:weight].

Lets say inputA = x and inputB = y.

Then, the syntax that I have devised for the formula is as follows:

score = sum(i for i in x if i in y) * w(i) / sum(i for i in x)* w(i)

In this case, *w(i) should be multiplying the wight of the corresponding feature.

Can someone please help me with the mathematical syntax in Python (i.w. correct or not according to the formula I am trying to convert) as this is the first time that I am trying it?

Thank you in advance

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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Close, but not quite. You want something like this:

from __future__ import division # this must be the very first import statement
score = sum(i*w(i) for i in x if i in y) / sum(i * w(i) for i in x)

Basically, you were leaving the w(i) out of the sum in both cases, which isn't what the formula does; furthermore, w(i) makes no sense outside of the sum anyway, since i only exists within the sum.

Checking if an element is in a list can be expensive. You could do better with:

from __future__ import division # this must be the very first import statement
xx = set(x)
yy = set(y)
score = sum(i*w(i) for i in xx & yy) / sum(i * w(i) for i in x)

where xx & yy is Python shorthand for xx.intersection(yy). This assumes that x and y never contain duplicate elements, but given the notation used in the formula, this appears to be a safe assumption to make.

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1  
Possible optimization: bb = xx & yy; def f(x): sum(i*w(i) for i in x); score=f(bb)/f(xx-bb) –  Elazar Oct 29 '13 at 11:18
1  
You have to check for float vs int, see testcase in my answer –  alko Oct 29 '13 at 11:28
    
Valid point, but his input data appears to be float anyway. When it's not always the case, I prefer to use future to handle such issues. –  misha Oct 30 '13 at 5:01

When you doubt about sintax and correctness, it's better to create a test case. I prefer doctests, but it's up to discussion.

def score(x, y, w):
    """
    Calcutates directional distributional similarity http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=1897650

    >>> score([1, 2], [1, 3], {1:2, 2:1, 3:1})
    0.42857142857142855
    """
    return sum(i for i in x if i in y) * w[i] / sum(i for i in x)* w[i]

and run this with nose

pip install nose
nosetests  --with-doctests

which gives for your code

Failed example:
    score([1, 2], [1, 3], {1:2, 2:1, 3:1})
Exception raised:
    Traceback (most recent call last):
       ...
    NameError: global name 'i' is not defined

----------------------------------------------------------------------
Ran 1 test in 0.531s

FAILED (failures=1)

so you can check up errors and fix. Output for slightly modified @misha's code

def score(x, y, w):
    """
    Calcutates directional distributional similarity http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=1897650

    >>> score([1, 2], [1, 3], {1:1.5, 2:1.0, 3:1.0})
    0.42857142857142855
    """
    xx = set(x)
    yy = set(y)
    return 1.0 * sum(i*w[i] for i in xx & yy) / sum(i * w[i] for i in x) 

will be

.
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Ran 1 test in 0.016s

OK

if you remove this 1.0* part, you'll get corrected:

Failed example:
    score([1, 2], [1, 3], {1:2, 2:1, 3:1})
Expected:
    0.42857142857142855
Got:
    0

More advanced test cases will help with correctness checking.

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