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Need to have class that can be instantiated, hold private and public varirables/methods.

Just want to sanity check that my implementation on prototypes is correct here.

Before: (jsFiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/7UqSv/1/)

var MyObject = (function ()
{        
    var oid = "'oid123'";
    var x = 1; 
    var y = 1;          
    incrementx = function()
    {        
         x = x +1;
         console.log('value of x: ' + x);
    }
    incrementxagain = function()
    {        
         x = x +1;
         console.log('value of x: ' + x);
    }
    return {
        oid : oid,
        incrementx: function (){ incrementx(); },
        incrementxagain: function (){ incrementxagain(); }      
    }
});

var NewMyObject = new MyObject();
NewMyObject.incrementx(); //outputs "value of x: 2"
NewMyObject.incrementxagain(); //outputs "value of x: 3"
console.log('oid ' + NewMyObject.oid); //outputs "oid 'oid123'"

After: (jsFiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/7UqSv/6/)

var MyObject = (function ()
{        
    var oid = "'oid123'";
    this.x = 1; 
    var y = 1;    
    //*** ADDED REFERENCE TO THIS USING $this
    var $this = this;
    //*** MOVED 'incrementx' FUNCTION TO PROTOTYPE BELOW
    incrementxagain = function()
    {        
         $this.x = $this.x +1;
         console.log('value of x: ' + $this.x);
    }
    return {
        oid : oid,
        incrementx: function (){ $this.incrementx(); },
        incrementxagain: function (){ incrementxagain(); }      
    }
});

 //****** ADDED PROTOTYPE METHOD
MyObject.prototype.incrementx = function() { 
    this.x = this.x + 1; 
    console.log('value of x:' + this.x);
}

var NewMyObject = new MyObject();
NewMyObject.incrementx(); //outputs "value of x: 2"
NewMyObject.incrementxagain(); //outputs "value of x: 3"
console.log('oid ' + NewMyObject.oid); //outputs "oid 'oid123'"

Both work, but found it weird that i have to change from using var to this on variables and then store a reference to this in $this on object creation? Also, means that as my code has alot of variables i am going to have to write more code because of the additional reference to 'this' now needed? i.e:

this:

result = (x + y + z) * ( x + y + z);

becomes:

this.result = (this.x + this.y + this.z) * (this.x + this.y + this.z);

Just a sanity check that what i am doing here is not an anit pattern or something?

Thanks

share|improve this question
    
Lexically scoped variables and prototype functions don't mix. –  Alnitak Oct 29 '13 at 13:17
    
ok, seeing as the object may not be instatiated more than a few times probably not worth using prototypes then as i will be writing hundreds of unneccessary 'this' statements otherwise bloating the code out –  Dere_2929 Oct 29 '13 at 14:07

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

A few comments:

  • Yes, unfortunately this is needed everywhere member access is used.
  • A common pattern is to use a variable named self (or _self etc) to keep the this reference. I would avoid using $this, as it could imply that jQuery (or other library) is involved. This of course is my preference of a coding convention, there is nothing wrong doing it your way as long as it is consistent in your code base.
  • Storing the this reference is used for referencing this from closures (e.g. callbacks), like:

    var MyObject = function() {
        var self = this;
        jQuery(something).on("click", function() {
            // `this` here is NOT what you expect; it is set by jQuery to be
            // the DOM element in this case; to refer to the object, use `self`
            // as defined above:
            self.clicked();
        });
    };
    
  • You do not need the parentheses around the constructor function: var MyObj = (function()...);var MyObj = function()...;

  • When you return something from a constructor function, it becomes the constructed object. So this != returnedValue!!! Watch out, this may introduce subtle bugs in your code!!!! So, instead of returning something, just add stuff to this (I'll give an example later)
  • By the way, incrementxagain is not defined as var, so it has gone to global scope!!! Another subtle bug!!!
  • The name MyObject is a bit disorienting; MyObject holds a constructor function (a class in traditional OO terms), not an object instance. So I would rather name it MyClass (and use it as var myObject = new MyClass()). Again this is more or less a preference.

My suggestion/example, loosely based on yours:

var MyClass = function(element) {
    // public fields
    this.oid = "'oid123'";
    this.x = 1;
    // private field
    var y = 1;
    // `element`, the argument, is another private field preserved in this closure

    var self = this;

    jQuery(element).on("click", function() {
        self.clicked();
    });

    // public accessor of private field
    this.getY = function() {
        // no this or self; the `y` variable of the closure is accessed
        return y;
    };

    // public method accessing private state
    this.incrementxagain = function() {
        // no inner closure, use `this` directly
        this.x = this.x + y;
    }
    // don't return anything; `this` is set correctly
});

// public methods
MyClass.prototype.incrementx = function() { 
    this.x = this.x + 1;
};

MyClass.prototype.clicked = function() {
    ...
};

var element = document.getElementById("foo");
var myObject = new MyClass(element);

Now myObject has the following properties:

  • oid
  • x

and methods:

  • incrementx()
  • clicked()
  • getY()
  • incrementxagain()

A pattern I use for creating private pseudo-methods so as not to create Function objects per instance:

var MyClass = (function() {
    function privatePseudoMethod1(x) {
        // `this` is passed as argument
        x.doStuff();
    }

    function privatePseudoMethod2() {
        // `this` is what you expect, but the call is more verbose
        this.doStuff();
    }

    // CONSTRUCTOR (to be returned after the prototype is set
    function MyClass(element) {
        ...
    }

    MyClass.prototype.xxx = function() {
        // two ways of calling private pseudo-methods
        privatePseudoMethod1(this);
        privatePseudoMethod1.call(this);
    };

    MyClass.prototype.doStuff = function() {
        ...
    };

    return MyClass; // <--- this becomes the constructor
})(); // <--- NOTE: the outer function is executed just once
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