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I'm finally pretty desperate. So, in my c++ class we were instructed to use classes. We'd have the header file declare the class and functions while a separate .cpp file implements the it. Things should be working, but they're not and no solutions on the web seem to be working for me. I'm using the G++ compiler on linux for this, and it doesn't seem to work on either IDE's or the normal command line.

The error I'm getting in my TBook.h is this:

/usr/lib/gcc/x86_64-linux-gnu/4.6/../../../x86_64-linux-gnu/crt1.o: In function `_start':
(.text+0x20): undefined reference to `main'
/tmp/ccxqI6An.o: In function `TBook::TBook()':
TBook.cpp:(.text+0x3b): undefined reference to `Telephone::Telephone()'
TBook.cpp:(.text+0x100): undefined reference to `Telephone::Telephone()'
TBook.cpp:(.text+0x132): undefined reference to `Telephone::allNum(std::basic_string<char, std::char_traits<char>, std::allocator<char> >)'
TBook.cpp:(.text+0x182): undefined reference to `Telephone::~Telephone()'
TBook.cpp:(.text+0x191): undefined reference to `Telephone::~Telephone()'
TBook.cpp:(.text+0x2b3): undefined reference to `Telephone::~Telephone()'
TBook.cpp:(.text+0x2e6): undefined reference to `Telephone::~Telephone()'
TBook.cpp:(.text+0x2fa): undefined reference to `Telephone::~Telephone()'
/tmp/ccxqI6An.o:TBook.cpp:(.text+0x370): more undefined references to `Telephone::~Telephone()' follow
/tmp/ccxqI6An.o: In function `TBook::write()':
TBook.cpp:(.text+0x4e1): undefined reference to `Telephone::getNumber()'
TBook.cpp:(.text+0x506): undefined reference to `Telephone::getAreaCode()'
TBook.cpp:(.text+0x53a): undefined reference to `Telephone::getName()'
/tmp/ccxqI6An.o: In function `TBook::lookup(std::basic_string<char, std::char_traits<char>, std::allocator<char> >)':
TBook.cpp:(.text+0x6d4): undefined reference to `Telephone::getName()'
TBook.cpp:(.text+0x79e): undefined reference to `Telephone::Telephone(int, std::basic_string<char, std::char_traits<char>, std::allocator<char> >, std::basic_string<char, std::char_traits<char>, std::allocator<char> >)'
/tmp/ccxqI6An.o: In function `TBook::print()':
TBook.cpp:(.text+0x880): undefined reference to `Telephone::getName()'
TBook.cpp:(.text+0x8e0): undefined reference to `Telephone::getNumber()'
TBook.cpp:(.text+0x8ff): undefined reference to `Telephone::getAreaCode()'
collect2: ld returned 1 exit status
[Finished in 0.3s with exit code 1]

I'm kind not liking that the file is not receiving any of the Telephone class's methods. Here's what the code looks like for TBook.cpp:

#ifndef TBOOK_H
#define TBOOK_H

#include "Telephone.h"

class TBook{
private:
    Telephone rolodex[10]; 
    int current;
    int max;
public:
    TBook();
    ~TBook();
    void add(Telephone);
    void write();
    bool is_full();
    void print();
    void check();
    Telephone lookup(string);

};

#endif

And this is what TBook.cpp looks like:

#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>
#include <string>

#include "TBook.h"
#include "Telephone.h"


using namespace std;

TBook::TBook(){
    current = 0;
    max = 9;

    cout << "Hello" << endl;

    string line;
    ifstream myfile ("rolodex.txt");
    if (myfile.is_open()){
        while ( getline (myfile,line) ){
            cout << line << endl;
            Telephone t;
            t.allNum(line);
            add(t);

        }
        myfile.close();
    }else if (!myfile.is_open()){
        ofstream myfile;
        myfile.open ("rolodex.txt");
        myfile << "This is an empty file (Relatively).";
        myfile.close();
    }
}

TBook::~TBook(){

}

void TBook::add(Telephone tel){
    if (!is_full()){
        rolodex[current] = tel;
        current++;
    }
}

void TBook::write(){
    ofstream myfile;
    myfile.open ("rolodex.txt");
    for (int i = 0; i < current; ++i)
    {
        myfile << rolodex[i].getName() << "," << rolodex[i].getAreaCode() << "," << rolodex[i].getNumber() << "\n";
    }
    myfile.close();
}

bool TBook::is_full(){
    if (current <= max){
        return false;
    }
    return true;
}

Telephone TBook::lookup(string lookName){
    for (int i = 0; i < current; ++i){
        if (rolodex[i].getName() == lookName){
            return rolodex[i];
        }
    }
    return Telephone(100, "", "1000000");
}

void TBook::print(){
    //Print the vairables
    for (int i = 0; i < current; ++i){
        cout << "Name: " << rolodex[i].getName() << endl;
    cout << "Number: (" <<  rolodex[i].getAreaCode() << ") " << rolodex[i].getNumber() << endl;
    }

}

void TBook::check(){
    cout << "the message" << endl;
}

Since the problem seems to be arising with the Telephone class, I figure I should also show that code too

Telephone.h

..

#ifndef TELEPHONE_H
#define TELEPHONE_H

#include <iostream>
#include <string>


using std::string;

class Telephone{
private:
    string name;
    string num;
    int areaCode;
public:
    Telephone(int, string, string);
    Telephone();
    ~Telephone();
    bool setAreaCode(int);

    //Setters

    void setName(string);
    void setNumber(string);
    bool allNum(string);

    //Getters
    string getName();
    string getNumber();
    int getAreaCode();

    //Checks
    bool checkX(int);
    bool checkY(int);


};

#endif

Telephone.cpp

..

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

#include "Telephone.h"

using namespace std;

Telephone::Telephone(){
    areaCode = 0
    name = "";
    num = "";
}

Telephone::Telephone(int aCode, string nam, string number){
   areaCode = aCode;
   name = name;

}

Telephone::~Telephone(){
    //Nope Nada
}

bool Telephone::allNum(string all){
    size_t found =  all.find_first_of(",");

    //
    string first = all.substr(0, found);
    string second = all.substr((found)+1, found+1);
    string third = all.substr( all.find_last_of(",")+1, all.length());
    int x, y;
    //convert string to int values
    if(third.length() == 7){
        x = atoi(third.substr(0,3).c_str()), 
        y = atoi(third.substr(3,4).c_str());
    }else{
        cerr << "Your phone number is not valid" << endl;
    }   
    int ac = atoi(second.substr(0, second.length()).c_str());

    setName(first);
    if (!setAreaCode(ac)){  
        setAreaCode(100);
        return true;

    }
    if (!checkX(x) || !checkY(y)){
            setNumber("1000000");
        }else{
            setNumber(third);
    }

    cerr << "The info provided is not valid" << endl;
    return false;
}

void Telephone::setNumber(string number){
    num = number;
}

bool Telephone::setAreaCode(int aCode){
    if(aCode >= 100 && aCode <= 999){
        areaCode = aCode;
        return true;
    }
    return false;
}

void  Telephone::setName(string theName){
    name = theName;
}

bool Telephone::checkX(int x){
    if(x >= 100 && x <= 999){
        return true;
    }
    cerr << "First three digits are not valid" << endl;
    return false;
}

bool Telephone::checkY(int y){
    if(y >= 0000 && y <= 9999){
        return true;
    }
    cerr << "Last four digits are not valid" << endl;
    return false;
}



//Getters
string Telephone::getName(){
    return name;
}

string Telephone::getNumber(){
    return num;
}

int Telephone::getAreaCode(){
    return areaCode;
}

And my main file (also called test.cpp) looks like this:

test.cpp

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include "TBook.h"
#include "Telephone.h"

using namespace std;


int main(int argc, char const *argv[])
{
    //Create a Rolodex
    TBook addressBook;

    return 0;
}

I'm also getting this error with test.cpp

/tmp/ccl8anRb.o: In function `main':
test.cpp:(.text+0x24): undefined reference to `TBook::TBook()'
test.cpp:(.text+0x38): undefined reference to `TBook::~TBook()'
collect2: ld returned 1 exit status

I think this is mostly a compiling error, but I'm still not sure, and I feel like I'm the setup of the meme "My code doesn't work, and I don't know why." Usually I would bash the code and try different methods until it works, but I simply don't have the time. I therefore need your help.

share|improve this question
    
Also, I used the guards in the header files. They don't really work for me. –  Kivo360 Oct 29 '13 at 14:44
5  
I am more interested in: 1) where your files are (altogether in the same dir?) and 2) the command line you use to compile your code. Are you using -c, then linking? Otherwise, are you giving g++ all the files containing all the class? Naive and easy way: g++ *.cpp... –  ShinTakezou Oct 29 '13 at 14:50
    
What ShinTakezou says; the error seems like you're not linking all the object files when linking the executable. –  Angew Oct 29 '13 at 14:52
2  
It's not about the code. Like Shin said, it's about how you compile things. I recommend you talk to your instructor and ask about the C++ compilation model (object files, linking, header files, etc). They should not have skipped this in class :( –  R. Martinho Fernandes Oct 29 '13 at 14:52
    
I use the 'g++ *.cpp' command. I realized that it's the way that should work, but for some reason it's not. –  Kivo360 Oct 29 '13 at 15:06

1 Answer 1

up vote 8 down vote accepted

This is a linker error. Try:

g++ test.cpp Telephone.cpp -o test

Basically, the linker is complaining about functions you used but didn't provide an implementation for. To see all the steps the compiler performs for you, throw in a -v:

g++ -v test.cpp Telephone.cpp -o test
share|improve this answer

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