Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

i have different location, but they all have a pattern :

some_text/some_text/some_text/log/some_text.text

all locations don't start with the same thing, and they dont have the same number of subdirectories, but i am interested in what comes after log/ only. I would like to extract the .text

edited question:

I have a lot of location :

/s/h/r/t/log/b.p
/t/j/u/f/e/log/k.h
/f/j/a/w/g/h/log/m.l

Just to show you that i don't know what they are, the user enters these location, so i have no idea what the user enters. THe only i know is that it always contains log/ followed by the name of the file.

I would like to extract the type of the file, whatever string comes after the dot

share|improve this question
    
So given a file path ..../log/something.otherthing you want otherthing? –  fedorqui Oct 29 '13 at 16:02
    
look at edited question please –  user2864207 Oct 29 '13 at 16:04
    
@fedorqui you understood my question –  user2864207 Oct 29 '13 at 16:04
    
OK then I guess you can find the answer in stackoverflow.com/a/965072/1983854 –  fedorqui Oct 29 '13 at 16:07

5 Answers 5

THe only i know is that it always contains log/ followed by the name of the file.

I would like to extract the type of the file, whatever string comes after the dot

based on this requirement, this line works:

grep -o '[^.]*$' file

for your example, it outputs:

text
share|improve this answer
    
thanks. that helped –  user2864207 Oct 29 '13 at 16:18

You can use bash built-in string operations. The example below will extract everything after the last dot from the input string.

$ var="some_text/some_text/some_text/log/some_text.text"
$ echo "${var##*.}"
text

Alternatively, use sed:

$ sed 's/.*\.//' <<< "$var"
text
share|improve this answer

Not the cleanest way, but this will work

sed -e "s/.*log\///" | sed -e "s/\..*//"

This is the sed patterns for it anyway, not sure if you have that string in a variable, or if you're reading from a file etc.

You could also grab that text and store in a sed register for later substitution etc. All depends on exactly what you are trying to do.

share|improve this answer
    
the string is in a variable –  user2864207 Oct 29 '13 at 16:05
    
Then it would be something like new_variable=$(echo $variable | sed -e "s/.*log\///" | sed -e "s/\..*//") ... that's in KShell ... let me try in Bash .. yep, works in both –  James Gawron Oct 29 '13 at 16:13

Using awk

awk -F'.' '{print $NF}' file

Using sed

sed 's/.*\.//' file
share|improve this answer

Running from the root of this structure:

    /s/h/r/t/log/b.p
    /t/j/u/f/e/log/k.h
    /f/j/a/w/g/h/log/m.l

This seems to work, you can skip the echo command if you really just want the file types with no record of where they came from.

    $ for DIR in *; do
    >  echo -n "$DIR  "
    >  find $DIR -path "*/log/*" -exec basename {} \; | sed 's/.*\.//'
    > done
    f  l
    s  p
    t  h
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.