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Need assistance to do this. Or advice about how to add string to string elements in array?

  1. We have 2 txt files with 100 or more strings in each:

    domain.txt
    domain1
    domain2
    ..
    title.txt
    title1
    tilte2
    ..

  2. and we have:

    string link = < a h ref="http://www.domain.com" target="_blank">title< /a>

  3. After reading files we would have 2 string arrays - we need to replace domain.com with each string from domain.txt and title with each string from title.txt like this:

    < a h ref="http://www.domain1.com" target="_blank">title1< /a>
    < a h ref="http://www.domain2.com" target="_blank">title2< /a>
    ..

  4. Save the result string array into 2 txt files in that way: from 1-50 strings to
    1.txt and from 50-100 to 2.txt file

What is the best way to do this by manipulating strings with strings array elements?

share|improve this question
    
This is trivial, sorry I will let someone else answer. Remember that strings are immutable, so you would want to do arr[12] = arr[12].replace("x", "y") and not just a = arr[12]; a.replace("x", "y"); (assuming that you keep things in an array). MSDN is your friend, code completion is as well. –  Hamish Grubijan Dec 27 '09 at 16:56
    
You say "100 or more", but later you want 1-50 in one file and 50-100 in a second file. How will that second part work if there are more than 100 lines? Do you want half in each file, or as many files as needed with at most 50 lines in each? –  Mark Byers Dec 27 '09 at 16:59
    
Thank you for your fast reply. With saving result from 1-50 i just wanted to know how can we choose spesific lines to be saved for example from 10th string to 20? –  new_coder Dec 27 '09 at 17:44

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This is probably the simplest way to read the files:

    string[] domains = File.ReadAllLines("domain.txt");
    string[] titles = File.ReadAllLines("titles.txt");

To make the substitutions you can use string.Format:

    int n = domains.Length;
    string[] results = new string[n];

    for (int i = 0; i < n; ++i)
    {
        results[i] = string.Format(
            @"<a href=""http://{0}"" target=""_blank"">{1}</a>",
            domains[i], titles[i]);
    }

To write the output you can use Linq:

    File.WriteAllLines("file1.txt", results.Take(n / 2).ToArray());
    File.WriteAllLines("file2.txt", results.Skip(n / 2).ToArray());

If your template is a paramter you might want to construct the format string dynamically rather than hardcoding it. Here is an example of how you could do that:

using System;
using System.IO;
using System.Linq;

class Program
{
    static string escapeBraces(string s)
    {
        return s.Replace("{", "{{").Replace("}", "}}");
    }

    static string createFormatString(string template, params string[] parameters)
    {
        template = escapeBraces(template);

        for (int i =0; i < parameters.Length; ++i) {
            template = template.Replace(
                escapeBraces(parameters[i]),
                "{" + i + "}");
        }

        return template;
    }

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        string template = @"<a {}href=""http://www.domain.com"" target=""_blank"">title</a>";
        string formatString = createFormatString(template, "www.domain.com", "title");

        string[] domains = File.ReadAllLines("domain.txt");
        string[] titles = File.ReadAllLines("title.txt");

        int n = domains.Length;
        if (titles.Length != n)
            throw new InvalidDataException("There must be the same number domains and titles.");

        string[] results = new string[n];
        for (int i = 0; i < n; ++i)
        {
            results[i] = string.Format(formatString, domains[i], titles[i]);
        }

        File.WriteAllLines("file1.txt", results.Take(n / 2).ToArray());
        File.WriteAllLines("file2.txt", results.Skip(n / 2).ToArray());
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
This is a way to form a string, but I think the asker wants to modify the existing template, which may not be the best way to proceed. –  Hamish Grubijan Dec 27 '09 at 16:57
    
Question: does ReadAllInes auto-close and dispose resources as using a "using" + IDisposable would? –  Hamish Grubijan Dec 27 '09 at 16:59
1  
@lpthnc: Yes, ReadAllLines uses a using block. You can see this in reflector. The implementation is effectively open a StreamReader in a using block, read the lines one at a time an add them to an ArrayList. Then return the ArrayList converted to a string[] using ArrayList.ToArray(typeof(string)). –  jason Dec 27 '09 at 17:03
    
@lpthnc: See update at end of comment which addresses your point. –  Mark Byers Dec 27 '09 at 17:43

This is beautiful using LINQ and some nice methods from File:

string[] domains = File.ReadAllLines(@"C:/domains.txt");
string[] titles = File.ReadAllLines(@"C:/titles.txt");
if(domains.Length != titles.Length) { throw new InvalidOperationException(); }
string link = "<a href=\"http://www.{0}.com\" target=\"_blank\">{1}</a>";
var results = domains.Select((domain, i) => String.Format(link, domain, titles[i]));
File.WriteAllLines("results1.txt", results.Take(results.Length / 2).ToArray());
File.WriteAllLines("results2.txt", results.Skip(results.Length / 2).ToArray());

It isn't clear what you want if there are more than one-hundred domain/title pairs so I split them in half.

share|improve this answer
    
Wow, almost as cool as Python ;) –  Hamish Grubijan Dec 27 '09 at 17:00
    
It is a lot more elegant in .NET 4.0 when we have Zip. –  Mark Byers Dec 27 '09 at 17:46
    
@Mark Byers: You are correct sir. –  jason Dec 27 '09 at 18:01

Another way is to do it lazily like this:

    	static IEnumerable<string> ReadLinesLazily(string file)
	{
		using (var reader = new StreamReader(file))
		{
			string line = null;
			while ((line = reader.ReadLine()) != null)
			{
				yield return line;
			}
		}
	}

	static void Combine()
	{
		const string link = "<a href=\"{0}\">{1}</a>";
		var links = ReadLinesLazily("domains.txt").Zip(ReadLinesLazily("titels.txt"), (d, t) => String.Format(link, d, t))
		// write links here
	}
share|improve this answer
1  
It might be worth mentioning that Zip is first included in .NET 4.0. –  Mark Byers Dec 27 '09 at 17:45

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