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I'm implementing a Character Buffer with two stacks. I am inserting an element with insert() method:

class Buffer
{
    private Stack<Character> stackLeft;
    private Stack<Character> stackRight;
    private int size;

    Buffer()
    {
        Stack<Character> stackLeft   = new Stack<Character>();
        Stack<Character> stackRight  = new Stack<Character>();
        size = 0;
    }

    public void insert(char c)
    {
        size ++;
        stackLeft.push(c); //This line returns NullPointerException
    }
}

Everytime it tries to push the c character variable, it throws Null pointer exception. Here's how I have called it from main:

public static void main(String[] args)
{
    Buffer tb = new Buffer();

    Character ch = new Character('a');
    tb.insert(ch);
    tb.insert(new Character('a'));
    tb.insert('a');
}

All of these return a null exception. Asserted that Character reaches inside the method fine. I used java.util.Stack; when it failed, I implemented my own. But it still failed.
What could I be doing wrong?
Any kind of help is appreciated!

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2  
FYI, if you ran this through a debugger you would have known exactly what was wrong in about 90 seconds. –  Cruncher Oct 29 '13 at 17:18
    
@Cruncher I haven't gotten really comfortable with debuggers yet. It's only my first year of programming, and 4 months of java. –  ShadoWalkeR Oct 29 '13 at 17:29
    
If you program regularly, then 1-2 hours learning your way around a debugger, will pay for itself in the first week. Not only will it help you spot bugs, it also teaches you to think like the machine. You'll become faster at tracing programs in your head without having to go to the debugger. –  Cruncher Oct 29 '13 at 17:33

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

With these lines in the constructor:

Stack<Character> stackLeft   = new Stack<Character>();
Stack<Character> stackRight  = new Stack<Character>();

You've created local variables named the same as the instance variables, so you haven't initialized the instance variables stackLeft and stackRight, so Java initializes them to null.

Remove the types so the names will resolve to the instance variables.

stackLeft   = new Stack<Character>();
stackRight  = new Stack<Character>();
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Yes, of course. I copy-pasted the definitions into the constructos. Very stupid of me. Thanks for the help! –  ShadoWalkeR Oct 29 '13 at 17:27
Buffer()
{
    Stack<Character> stackLeft   = new Stack<Character>();
    Stack<Character> stackRight  = new Stack<Character>();
    size = 0;
}

You need to change this to

Buffer()
{
    stackLeft   = new Stack<Character>();
    stackRight  = new Stack<Character>();
    size = 0;
}

It thinks you are creating new local variables in the Buffer() constructor, instead of instantiating the class fields;

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Its because the constructer Buffer() doesn't set the class variables, but create its own local variable(stackLeft, stackRight) and initializes that

Change this::

class Buffer
{
    private Stack<Character> stackLeft;
    private Stack<Character> stackRight;
    private int size;

    Buffer()
    {
        stackLeft   = new Stack<Character>();
        stackRight  = new Stack<Character>();
        size = 0;
    }

    public void insert(char c)
    {
        size ++;
        stackLeft.push(c); //This line returns NullPointerException
    }
}
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