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Haven't Python iterators got a hasNext method?

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12 Answers 12

up vote 28 down vote accepted

No, there is no such method. The end of iteration is indicated by an exception. See the documentation.

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30  
"It's easier to ask for forgiveness than permission." –  Roger Pate Dec 27 '09 at 18:57
27  
"It's easier to ask for forgiveness than permission.": Checking whether an iterator has a next element is not asking for permission. There are situations in which you want to test for the existence of a next element without consuming it. I would accept the try catch solution if there was an unnext() method to put the first element back after I have checked that it exists by calling next(). –  Giorgio Dec 24 '12 at 20:26
5  
@Giorgio, there is no way to know whether another element exists without executing the code that generates it (you don't know whether the generator will execute yield or not). It is, of course, not difficult to write an adaptor that stores the result of next() and provides has_next() and move_next(). –  avakar Dec 24 '12 at 21:10
3  
The same idea could be used to implement the hasNext() method (to produce, cache and return true on success, or return false on failure). Then both hasNext() and next() would depend on a common underlying getNext() method and cached item. I really do not see why next() shouldn't be in the standard library if it is so easy to implement an adaptor that provides it. –  Giorgio Dec 24 '12 at 21:21
2  
@LarsH: You mean e.g. an iterator that reads from a file that can be changed while reading from it? I agree that this can be a problem (which affects any library providing next() and hasNext() method, not just a hypothetical Python library). So yes, next() and hasNext() becomes tricky if the content of the stream being scanned depends on when elements are read. –  Giorgio Jan 25 '13 at 6:42

There's an alternative to the StopIteration by using next(iterator, default_value).

For exapmle:

>>> a = iter('hi')
>>> print next(a, None)
h
>>> print next(a, None)
i
>>> print next(a, None)
None

So you can detect for None or other pre-specified value for end of the iterator if you don't want the exception way.

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15  
if you use None as the "sentinel", you best be sure your iterator doesn't have any Nones. you could also do sentinel = object() and next(iterator, sentinel) and test with is. –  sam boosalis Oct 3 '13 at 18:00

If you really need a has-next functionality (because you're just faithfully transcribing an algorithm from a reference implementation in Java, say, or because you're writing a prototype that will need to be easily transcribed to Java when it's finished), it's easy to obtain it with a little wrapper class. For example:

class hn_wrapper(object):
  def __init__(self, it):
    self.it = iter(it)
    self._hasnext = None
  def __iter__(self): return self
  def next(self):
    if self._hasnext:
      result = self._thenext
    else:
      result = next(self.it)
    self._hasnext = None
    return result
  def hasnext(self):
    if self._hasnext is None:
      try: self._thenext = next(self.it)
      except StopIteration: self._hasnext = False
      else: self._hasnext = True
    return self._hasnext

now something like

x = hn_wrapper('ciao')
while x.hasnext(): print next(x)

emits

c
i
a
o

as required.

Note that the use of next(sel.it) as a built-in requires Python 2.6 or better; if you're using an older version of Python, use self.it.next() instead (and similarly for next(x) in the example usage). [[You might reasonably think this note is redundant, since Python 2.6 has been around for over a year now -- but more often than not when I use Python 2.6 features in a response, some commenter or other feels duty-bound to point out that they are 2.6 features, thus I'm trying to forestall such comments for once;-)]]

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In addition to all the mentions of StopIteration, the Python "for" loop simply does what you want:

>>> it = iter("hello")
>>> for i in it:
...     print i
...
h
e
l
l
o
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hasNext somewhat translates to the StopIteration exception, e.g.:

>>> it = iter("hello")
>>> it.next()
'h'
>>> it.next()
'e'
>>> it.next()
'l'
>>> it.next()
'l'
>>> it.next()
'o'
>>> it.next()
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
StopIteration
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Try the __length_hint__() method from any iterator object:

iter(...).__length_hint__() > 0
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3  
I always wondered why on earth python has all those __ xxx __ methods ? They seem so ugly. –  mP. Feb 1 '10 at 11:45
1  
Legitimate question! Usually it's the syntax for methods that are exposed by a builtin function (e.g. len, is actually calling len). Such a builtin function does not exists for length_hint, but it is actually a pending proposal (PEP424). –  fulmicoton Feb 2 '13 at 12:13

No. The most similar concept is most likely a StopIteration exception.

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7  
What Python uses exceptions for control flow ? Sounds pretty nafted. –  mP. Feb 1 '10 at 11:44
3  
Right: exceptions should be used to handle errors, not to define the normal flow of control. –  Giorgio Dec 24 '12 at 20:23

I believe python just has next() and according to the doc, it throws an exception is there are no more elements.

http://docs.python.org/library/stdtypes.html#iterator-types

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You can tee the iterator using, itertools.tee, and check for StopIteration on the teed iterator.

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The use case that lead me to search for this is the following

def setfrom(self,f):
    """Set from iterable f"""
    fi = iter(f)
    for i in range(self.n):
        try:
            x = next(fi)
        except StopIteration:
            fi = iter(f)
            x = next(fi)
        self.a[i] = x 

where hasnext() is available, one could do

def setfrom(self,f):
    """Set from iterable f"""
    fi = iter(f)
    for i in range(self.n):
        if not hasnext(fi):
            fi = iter(f) # restart
        self.a[i] = next(fi)

which to me is cleaner. Obviously you can work around issues by defining utility classes, but what then happens is you have a proliferation of twenty-odd different almost-equivalent workarounds each with their quirks, and if you wish to reuse code that uses different workarounds, you have to either have multiple near-equivalent in your single application, or go around picking through and rewriting code to use the same approach. The 'do it once and do it well' maxim fails badly.

Furthermore, the iterator itself needs to have an internal 'hasnext' check to run to see if it needs to raise an exception. This internal check is then hidden so that it needs to be tested by trying to get an item, catching the exception and running the handler if thrown. This is unnecessary hiding IMO.

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good approach for such question/problems is check what we have in dir(object/method/iterator/type/class/ ...)

you will see that dir(iterator) return __length_hint__

and iterator.__length_hint__() is positive until end of the iteration.

that's it.

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I like this:

While(True):
    try:
        # Do something with the next value
        iterator.next()
    except StopIteration:
        break
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