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I have a for loop and I want to increment the variable by 0.1 each time, however the value changes differently from the increment and I am unsure as to why.

I've simplified the for loop and it still gives a strange output:

for (my $t = 1000; $t < 1500 ;$t+=0.1) {
print "$t\n";
}

It prints:

1034.9
1035
1035.1
1035.2
1035.3
1035.4
1035.49999999999
1035.59999999999
1035.69999999999
1035.79999999999
1035.89999999999
1035.99999999999
1036.09999999999
1036.19999999999
1036.29999999999
[it then goes on like this to 1500]

I do not know where the decimal places are coming from. Is this a problem with my understanding of Perl?

Thanks in advance.

share|improve this question
11  
FAQ: perldoc.perl.org/…? – toolic Oct 29 '13 at 18:17
6  
It's worse than that. It's a problem with your understanding of floating point arithmetic. Change your print statement to printf "%.18f\n",$t; for enlightenment. – mob Oct 29 '13 at 18:19
1  
Wait, what? No-one is linking to "What Every Programmer Should Know About Floating Point Arithmetic"? There should be a badge for this.... docs.oracle.com/cd/E19957-01/806-3568/ncg_goldberg.html – Paul Dixon Oct 29 '13 at 18:25
4  
@PaulDixon, the Perl FAQ that was linked to has a link to that paper. – cjm Oct 29 '13 at 18:31
    
really?, curses! :) – Paul Dixon Oct 29 '13 at 18:44
up vote 9 down vote accepted

1/10 is a periodic number in binary like 1/3 is in decimal. It cannot be represented exactly as a floating point number.

$ perl -e'printf "%.20g\n", 0.1'
0.10000000000000001

Never compare a floating pointer number to another without involving a tolerance, and be wary of accumulation of error.

The simple solution here to to do the arithmetic using integers, and generate the floating point numbers when needed

for (my $tx10 = 10000; $tx10 < 15000; ++$tx10) {
   my $t = $tx10/10;
   print "$t\n";
}

which simplifies to

for my $tx10 (10000..14999) {
   my $t = $tx10/10;
   print "$t\n";
}

         ____            ____             ____
0.1 = 0.00011    0.4 = 0.0110    0.7 = 0.10110
        ____                              ____
0.2 = 0.0011     0.5 = 0.1       0.8 = 0.11001
         ____            ____             ____
0.3 = 0.01001    0.6 = 0.1001    0.9 = 0.11100
share|improve this answer
for (my $t = 1000; $t < 1500 ;$t+=.1) {
    printf("%.1f\n", $t);
}
share|improve this answer

Alternative:

for (10000..14999) {
  my $t = $_/10;
  print "$t\n";
}

Since 0.1 cannot be exactly specified in binary, rounding errors will accumulate in your code. In this answer, the amount always stays close enough to exact so that perl's internal number to string rounding will display the correct number. Lesson: use integers whenever possible.

share|improve this answer
    
This goes up to 1500.0, where the original code went up to 1499.9. – cjm Oct 29 '13 at 18:30
    
Easy enough to fix... – runrig Oct 29 '13 at 18:35

To test for the condition

perl -le 'for (my $t = 1000.0; $t < 1500.0 ;$t+=0.1) {  print $t}'| perl -n -e '($a)=/(\d$)/; print "fail $a $b $_" if ($a eq $b); $b=$a'

yet another way to fix it

perl -le 'for (my $t = 1000.0; $t < 1500.0 ;$t+=0.1) { $t=sprintf("%.1f", $t); print $t}'| perl -n -e '($a)=/(\d$)/; print "fail $a $b $_" if ($a eq $b); $b=$a'
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